Having read and reread "The Hunt for Red October" more times than I care to remember got me thinking about what would have happened to the Red October and her defecting officers?
The book ends with the Typhoon class SSBN Red October arriving in the US and being hidden in a covered dry dock with her officers being moved to safe houses. I know that Tom Clancy makes very brief references to the Red October and Capt Ramius in his later books but I'm more interested in the long term bigger picture.

If a cutting edge Soviet SSBN on its first deployment and it's senior officers really had defected to the US in 1984 with the Soviets believing the boat destroyed (Along with a pair of SSN's lost to probably unknown causes) and a large naval confrontation having taken place in the Atlantic what would the effects of this have been to both sides?

With a real life Soviet SSBN available for them to examine and do with as they pleased along with Soviet officers on hand to explain how everything works what secrets could the US have learnt and how might they have exploited them?

The Soviets were aware of Capt Ramius's intention to defect and did everything they could to stop it even losing a pair of SSN's along the way. Would they have really completely believed that the Red October had been lost and how likely is it that they may have found out what really happened? If so how would they have reacted?

The majority of the ships company (Ratings and junior officers) were tricked into abandoning the boat due to a staged reactor accident and repatriated back to the Soviet Union. What would likely have happened to these men upon their return (especially the medical officer who was the only senior officer to have "survived")?

In the long term assuming that the truth finally comes out after the end of the Cold War (as happened with Project Azorian) and the US Government admits that it did have a Soviet SSBN in its possession for a time what would the reaction of modern Russia be?
Given the sheer number of people who through being involved with various evaluation projects would be aware of the existence of a Soviet SSBN in a US shipyard the potential for an information leak is there.

And finally what would have become of the Red October herself and her defecting captain and his officers?
 

Nebogipfel

Monthly Donor
Maybe combine it with Firefox - which IIRC takes place in the early 80s too. For realism, not the unrealistic beast of the novel/movie, but a very advanced prototype in a TL were the US missed stealth. In any case, if the whole thing is confirmed post 2000, I wonder how Putins Russia would take such a humiliation (trying to steal a B2 ?)
 
Russia would demand the return of the sub, and would most likely get it back.
There would probably also be a lot of patent litigation filed, as I assume the us would have exploited the technology (the drive I mean) which was a clear advance over then US propulsion.
Marko ramius would be hailed as a national hero of, it was Estonia right?
But other than that not much.
Would presumably be made into a movie now that all could be declassified.
Hopefully a good one.
 
The Soviets were aware of Capt Ramius's intention to defect and did everything they could to stop it even losing a pair of SSN's along the way. Would they have really completely believed that the Red October had been lost and how likely is it that they may have found out what really happened? If so how would they have reacted?
And finally what would have become of the Red October herself and her defecting captain and his officers?

Well, if they can keep the switching of the RMS Olympic and the RMS Titanic from all the shipyard workers and the world and his wife quiet for over eighty years

. . . . there's no doubt they could hide the Red October!;)😁
 
The Soviets are publicly going to keep things as quiet as they can. After all the details of the story are utterly humiliating to the USSR. Their most advanced submarine has been destroyed after its captain mutinied and tried to defect and one of the subs you sent to catch him has been lost you are not going to want to admit it. Since the entire sequence of events was set off by a Soviet captain they can hardly even go looking to 'get even' with the USA in diplomatic or political terms. Most likely heads are going to roll inside the USSR, both in the navy and the KGB for failing to identify this plot and stop it.

If the truth comes out post Cold War in the 90's I suspect a lot of people are going to be sceptical about tales of CIA derring do in the west and of course there aren't going to be any records in the archives of the former USSR that even admit the Red October ever existed.
 
Since the entire sequence of events was set off by a Soviet captain they can hardly even go looking to 'get even' with the USA in diplomatic or political terms.
Might the Soviets attempt to get even in military terms somehow given that almost every single military secret held by the Soviet Navy has now just been compromised?
Failing that what might they do in terms of damage imitation?
 
Might the Soviets attempt to get even in military terms somehow given that almost every single military secret held by the Soviet Navy has now just been compromised?
Failing that what might they do in terms of damage imitation?
In the short term they probably just focus on trying to steal whatever advances the US makes with the caterpillar drive. Bear in mind that the hardliners are going to be in disgrace after this event and the new people are more likely to want to de-escalate tensions.
 
Wasn't the book inspired by the real-life mutiny a Valery Sablin? Though obviously he wasn't attempting to escape the USSR...

Correct.

Instead of him and the crew making best speed to a neutral country to claim asylum, they tried instead to get to Leningrad (its been ages since I watched the documentary on CH-5 UK so I stand corrected if wrong) and cause an uprising.
 
It would have been better if he Wrote the book about a destroyer than a submarine

Thing is though, having a Capt with a SLBM carrying sub is way more of a threat than a destroyer.

I think he wrote it that way to get the US and NATO in the thick of it straight from the get go and heighten the tension.

When the US Adml at the briefing says "My GOD!!!! . . . they've got a madman on the loose!", it wouldn't have worked if the Capt was running with a mere destroyer.

On the other hand, if he wrote a book regarding the original story and what actually happened, that would've worked, but not if he went the 'Red October' way.
 
Thing is though, having a Capt with a SLBM carrying sub is way more of a threat than a destroyer.

I think he wrote it that way to get the US and NATO in the thick of it straight from the get go and heighten the tension.

When the US Adml at the briefing says "My GOD!!!! . . . they've got a madman on the loose!", it wouldn't have worked if the Capt was running with a mere destroyer.

On the other hand, if he wrote a book regarding the original story and what actually happened, that would've worked, but not if he went the 'Red October' way.
Good points
I was just saying it as I feel destroyer and frigate type ships rarely get screen time
 
Good points
I was just saying it as I feel destroyer and frigate type ships rarely get screen time

In that case they need to remake "The Enemy Below", possibly with Jurgen Pochnow reappraising his U-boat role and possibly Sam Neil as the destroyer skipper especially as they played alongside one another in "In The Mouth Of Madness!"

or actually get "Destroyer!" . . . the story of HMS Coventry in 1982 out of creative hell and get made.

or even make a film based on the original real story, it would do surprisingly well at the cinema me thinks.
 
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