WI: RMS Titanic collides with SS New York during departure.

The sailing is delayed while they check for damage and even if it's just an hour or two Titanic never hits the iceberg. The end result is the ship reaches New York and unless some later disaster happens the vast majority of people never hear of her.

This probably leads to more people dying as shipping regulations don't change and come 1914-18 ships are still sailing without a 24hr wireless watch or an adequate number of lifeboats.
24hr wireless watch is probably going to come in in 1914 anyway due to fear of commerce raiders and then of submarines. But the lifeboats thing is going to kill a lot of passengers in WW1.
 

CalBear

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The voyage ends there. Titanic avoids the iceberg and has the usual steamer career until WW1 where it probably serves as a hospital ship and then after that it is scrapped.
Likely SUNK during WW 1. Her sister Britannic was lost to a mine in the Med and Olympic survived by the Grace Of God (U-103 had her lined up for an attack but BOTH stern tubes on board the sub mechanicaled. instead of taking at least one likely hit, if not two, Olympic turned the tables on U-103, rammed and sank her.

It is worth noting that, thanks to alterations made to the other two ships after the loss of Titanic the loss of Britannic resulted on only 30 lives lost out of almost 1,100 souls aboard.
 
As others have said, it butterflies away the OTL disaster...but I do not think that it simply pushes that back to any later one in substitution. Titanic's now quotidian sailing career is extremely unlikely to offer the same hazard twice, and this incident would not affect the rest of the operational history of the North Atlantic liners in any real way. The only major sinkings that I can think of were,
  • Lusitania, which sank too quickly (and at a list) to launch all of her (now theoretically sufficient number of) lifeboats. In any case, this was a attack on the ship during war, and would hardly have been looked at as any deficiency in the ship's design or equipment.
  • Britannic was also a wartime casualty. The post-Titanic sinking alterations did not prevent her foundering (which took place in slightly under an hour), and the number of survivors (1,306) was only slightly greater than the capacity of Titanic's (and, presumably, an unmodified Britannic's) lifeboat capacity of 1,178. Many of Britannic's survivors were pulled from the water as it was so not even all that lifeboat capacity would be used.
  • Andrea Doria was the last of the great Atlantic liner disasters, and was also unable to use half of her lifeboats due to a severe list. Yet almost every passenger that survived the initial collision was rescued.
So, imo, it would be entirely possible-even likely-that the age of the 20th century Atlantic liners would have passed without any such disasters at all.
 
Here's a fanciful thought to ponder, though it's very unlikely they'd have done it. (She's far too large for it to be done at that time)

Titanic misses the Iceberg and is in the yard for some repairs at the time of the Battle of Jutland and HMS Campania's failure to participate. Due to this she ends up being converted into a larger version of HMS Argus. 24 years later Titanic becomes famous for assisting HMS Illustrious in the attack on Taranto.
 
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Perhaps the sinking of the Empress of Ireland might have a similar effect to this TL as OTL Titanic, but I think that it's too close to the Great War to have any meaningful effect upon what comes next.
 
Perhaps the sinking of the Empress of Ireland might have a similar effect to this TL as OTL Titanic, but I think that it's too close to the Great War to have any meaningful effect upon what comes next.
Also too quick of a sinking. Like Empress of Ireland sank way too quickly for there to be the drama that existed with the sinking of the Titanic. Also since both Lusitania and Empress of Ireland sank so quickly, you're not gonna get the same imperative to change the laws about the amount of lifeboats, because it doesn't matter if there are not enough lifeboats for everybody if the ship sinks too quickly for them to be used.
 
Here's a fanciful thought to ponder, though it's very unlikely they'd have done it. (She's far too large for it to be done at that time)

Titanic misses the Iceberg and is in the yard for some repairs at the time of the Battle of Jutland and HMS Campania's failure to participate. Due to this she ends up being converted into a larger version of HMS Argus. 24 years later Titanic becomes famous for assisting HMS Illustrious in the attack on Taranto.

Thats a lot of work....from what I understand what became Argus was just a hull with little in the way of superstructure etc.
 
One possible effect; the British press make much hay of the collision of New York and Titanic and compare them to the Olympic - Hawke collision. Questions are Asked about the giant liners safety, the issues about lifeboats, hull and watertight door design, wireless regs and above all about the very out of date Board of Trade regulations- regulations that are guided by a committee of ship owners lead to awkward Questions in the House of Commons concerning who is in charge of safety and if ‘lives are being played with’.

Legislation is tabled and by the end of 1913 lifeboats for all, and 24 hr wireless is law. Bulkheads and such changes are deferred.

Titanic has a good career, someone survives WW1 like her sisters and returns to service. Due to butterflies caused by Taft, Astor etc surviving Prohibition does not happen and the Depression is a Recession instead, and immigration continues. White Star remains solvent.

In 1928 Oceanic is laid down and the 1930’s sees Olympic sold for as a Hotel in France in 1933. Titanic lasts longer until the second Oceanic liner comes online in 1934, where in she is retired and brought by the Royal Navy as a training ship. Britannic is due to be withdrawn in 1937 when the next Oceanic class is finished, but the dark clouds over Europe sees White Star paid by the govt to keep Britannic is working order ‘in case’.

Britannic would survive the war (unlike her sisters) along with 2 of the Oceanic’s, but the coming of the jet liner kills the Atlantic liner trade dead in the 50’s. To everyone surprise Britannic is brought by an Australian millionaire who opens it as a war museum and hotel in Sydney as a way to remember those lost in WW2, and the role Britannic played in shipping troops during WW2.

White star and Cunard would properly merge in the 50’s at government insistence and in survive on small cruises, cargo ships, and smaller routes until the revival of cruising in the 80’s see them lay down the New Olympic class starting with Old Reliable herself Olympic II.
 
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