Gilberto Freyre was an important intellectual who shaped a lot about how Brazilians think about race relations in the country. He basically argued that Brazil has always been a society of interracial relationships, arguing, for example, that the relationship between slaveowners and their slaves in Brazil was better than it was, for example, in the American South. Now obviously he didn't singlehandedly created this theory, but he was the one who propelled it into mainstream thought. So, my question is, if Gilberto Freyre simply never existed, how would Brazilian analysis on race relations develop? Would Brazilian intellectuals take a more """"scientific"""" view of race and argue for more strict racist laws, to implement some type of Brazilian Jim Crow? Would they, instead, take a more conciliatory view on race, rejecting it outright as an invalid social construction (Which, admittedly, would be very Progressive even for the standards of the late-20th century)? Would Brazil become even more racist? OTL we had many policies to "whiten" our population and there were some establishments that refused services to blacks until racism became a crime in the 1950s, so, without a Freyrean view on race to "soften" Brazilian intellectuals, would race relations go even worse? Or would they improve?
@Gukpard @Vinization
 
Without Freyre, you still have Sérgio Buarque de Holanda's Raízes do Brasil - also, while Freyre helped shape the spirit of the times back then, he was a product of that spirit as well. Signs point for a different approach to race in comparison with the US one.
 
Without Freyre, you still have Sérgio Buarque de Holanda's Raízes do Brasil - also, while Freyre helped shape the spirit of the times back then, he was a product of that spirit as well. Signs point for a different approach to race in comparison with the US one.
Thanks, I confess that I forgot about Holanda's contributions to this field
 
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