WI: Katherine of Aragon dies in 1503 giving birth to Arthur's posthumous son

Yes, but probably not much longer than in OTL.

No, he didn't remarry in otl when he had only one male heir. Now he has two so he has less reason to remarry.

Around 6 or 7.

Almost 18.

I think that Henry would be part of a regency council but not the sole regent. There's also Margaret Beaufort, in otl she was Henry VIII's regent for a few weeks until he turned 18, so I could see her being part of the regency council for her great-grandson.

In theory, yes but I can't think of any Scottish brides for him and he'll probably be better off with a French proxy bride or a local heiress.

Unlikely.

I don't know.
Well, we do not know. His father (Arthur Prince of Wales) obviously did NOT have a problem with male heirs in this timeline, but we know Katherine of Aragon did, so we are hoping for his father's genes to triumph. Also, King Arthur Jr (since that's the name now) is 100000% not marrying a Scottish woman simply because there are none his age. However, a son of his could wed Mary, Queen of Scots
 
There is an entire peerage, but knowing how Edward VI's regency council went IOTL, do you honestly think Henry will want that for his nephew especially since he will be alive to witness it? Naaaah. Either he and his grandmother are co-regents, or he's an overwhelmingly dominant regent in the council of regents, ooooorrrr he marries one of Katherine's relatives and she becomes regent?
Huh? Edward VI hasn't even been born yet (if he is born at all in ATL) so how could Henry VII "know how Edward VI's regency council went?" There are no lessons of failure for Henry to learn here. Indeed, I would guess that Henry and parliament would be rather strongly in favor of a power-sharing regency council considering that the last time a single a single figure was named as protector -- which, again, was only the second time this had happened since the Conquest, as all other minorities were run by councils (even technically including Mortimer's tyranny) -- it ended with the disappearance of the boy king and another round of civil war. Henry would be extremely foolish to have not learned the lesson of the events that led to his very own reign.
 
Huh? Edward VI hasn't even been born yet (if he is born at all in ATL) so how could Henry VII "know how Edward VI's regency council went?" There are no lessons of failure for Henry to learn here. Indeed, I would guess that Henry and parliament would be rather strongly in favor of a power-sharing regency council considering that the last time a single a single figure was named as protector -- which, again, was only the second time this had happened since the Conquest, as all other minorities were run by councils (even technically including Mortimer's tyranny) -- it ended with the disappearance of the boy king and another round of civil war. Henry would be extremely foolish to have not learned the lesson of the events that led to his very own reign.
True. OK, so the whole peerage are regents led by Henry the Duke of York. Do we think this child king will be quickly pushed into a wedding?
 
Pretty unlikely considering who Henry was too much religious for trying something like that
Funny how we're talking Henry the 8th having scruples. I'm not disagreeing but considering he'd be in the running for worst family man ever award....
 
Funny how we're talking Henry the 8th having scruples. I'm not disagreeing but considering he'd be in the running for worst family man ever award....
Listen, Henry in no world will be good in a paternal role. BUT, he is still in charge of his young nephew until this nephew is able to be king. Do we think Henry will flirt with a bunch of his nephew's female servants?
 
Henry VII will die before the son can marry, so it will be up to the king's uncle, also called Henry, to ultimately call the shots. Henry 7th forced Henry 8th to repudiate his betrothal to Katherine of Aragon in 1505. Guess what happened...?
Is it possible that with a pregnant Katherine, that Elizabeth of York's pregnancy - and thus her post partum death OTL - are butterflied away?

With the positive effects of a living Elizabeth on H-VII, does that likely push his death past 1509?

And what positive effects might a longer lived Elizabeth have on:
- Henry Duke of York?
- The regency once H-VII does die?
- The development of her grandson?
 
Listen, Henry in no world will be good in a paternal role. BUT, he is still in charge of his young nephew until this nephew is able to be king. Do we think Henry will flirt with a bunch of his nephew's female servants?

Hell yes. That brings up another disturbing idea, Uncle Henry, guiding the younger generation on the fairer sex.
 
Is it possible that with a pregnant Katherine, that Elizabeth of York's pregnancy - and thus her post partum death OTL - are butterflied away?

With the positive effects of a living Elizabeth on H-VII, does that likely push his death past 1509?

And what positive effects might a longer lived Elizabeth have on:
- Henry Duke of York?
- The regency once H-VII does die?
- The development of her grandson?

Would a surviving Elizabeth outlive her husband H7 and could she then take over the Regency for Arthur Jr?
 
There's no way Elizabeth of York is regent if Henry, the Duke of York is still around. As the senior most male heir to his nephew it's his right and England has long been skeptical of women being regents.
 
If Henry VII dies in 1509 like he did in OTL, meaning Arthur becomes king at age 6 or so....his uncle Henry is still a very young man and though he's probably been brought up to speed by his father and grandmother, he probably would still need assistance. Henry VII was nothing if not a meticulous administrator, it would be within character for him to name a regency council with Henry of York as the head.

However, it is more than likely that Henry will have custody of his nephew and be able to raise him as he sees fit. He'll probably be the one who knights Arthur, for instance.
 
Is it possible that with a pregnant Katherine, that Elizabeth of York's pregnancy - and thus her post partum death OTL - are butterflied away?

With the positive effects of a living Elizabeth on H-VII, does that likely push his death past 1509?

And what positive effects might a longer lived Elizabeth have on:
- Henry Duke of York?
- The regency once H-VII does die?
- The development of her grandson?
I truly do not see the correlation between Katherine's pregnancy and Elizabeth's. The two do not relate to each other's. Plus wasn't her final pregnancy planned just in case Henry also died young? She could also think that Katherine could potentially have a daughter - we know she won't, Elizabeth wouldn't - and thus help create a "secure" Tudor bloodline with one final shot at a male heir...

But if she lives longer, well, H7 dies happier. Henry, Duke of York adored his mother, thinking her the ideal wife, queen and mother and IOTL he couldn't find it anywhere for himself. She won't help with the regency when there are a ton of men around who will take control, but she can definitely dote on her grandson and be mother in all but name.
 
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