WI: earlier abolition of slavery in Brazil.

Greetings, fellow forum members! Today I learned there was a plan to abolish slavery in Brazil a lot earlier than how it happened in our timeline. The plan was made by José Bonifácio de Andrada e Silva, one of the main "architects" of the brazilian independence and who helped to create the Brazilian Empire. Here's a link where I found about the project (unfortunately, it's all in Portuguese).

Also, in this site here you can actually download the actual Representation (if you can read Portuguese). The Bill itself begins on page 33.

In short, the Representation, followed by a Bill, proposed in 1823 during the Constitutional Assembly, basically consisted of four goals:

• End the slave trade within a maximum of five years;

• Make it easier for slaves to buy their freedom;

• End corporal punishment;

• Grant small strips of land so that freed blacks (by buying their freedom or by other means) could produce and prosper, etc.

However, such project wasn't approved because the Constitutional Assembly was dissolved by the emperor Peter I, and Bonifácio, who was against the monarch's action, was arrested and exiled, returning to Brazil only years later, now without his prestige and influence.

However, what if, somehow, this bill was approved in 1823? How would things change?
 
Brazil was somewhat unstable during this time period. After all, we're only two years before the breakout of the Cisplatine War- the course of that war is likely to be seriously altered if the large Brazilian landowners are newly disaffected. My first question is how effective Brazil would have been at enforcing any anti-slave trade laws passed at the time.

OTOH, Pedro II's abolition of the slave trade actually proved profitable for the Brazilian government- breaking up big landowners and encouraging smaller farms, even though it wasn't the main goal of the act, made tax evasion significantly more difficult. If the Brazilian government can introduce and enforce such legislation then in the long run it will likely have many positive effects for Brazil: easier tax collection, more immigration, better relations with the British and somewhat less consolidated land ownership, to name but a few.
 
Greetings, fellow forum members! Today I learned there was a plan to abolish slavery in Brazil a lot earlier than how it happened in our timeline. The plan was made by José Bonifácio de Andrada e Silva, one of the main "architects" of the brazilian independence and who helped to create the Brazilian Empire. Here's a link where I found about the project (unfortunately, it's all in Portuguese).

Also, in this site here you can actually download the actual Representation (if you can read Portuguese). The Bill itself begins on page 33.

In short, the Representation, followed by a Bill, proposed in 1823 during the Constitutional Assembly, basically consisted of four goals:

• End the slave trade within a maximum of five years;

• Make it easier for slaves to buy their freedom;

• End corporal punishment;

• Grant small strips of land so that freed blacks (by buying their freedom or by other means) could produce and prosper, etc.

However, such project wasn't approved because the Constitutional Assembly was dissolved by the emperor Peter I, and Bonifácio, who was against the monarch's action, was arrested and exiled, returning to Brazil only years later, now without his prestige and influence.

However, what if, somehow, this bill was approved in 1823? How would things change?
Bonifácio's plan on how to end slavery sounds like a good idea,but what about the Brazilian Army and Navy,would their loyalty to the monarchy after the Brazilian War of Independence still stay strong?
 
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Bonifácio's plan on how to end slavery sounds like a good idea,but what about the Brazilian Army and Navy,would their loyalty to the monarchy after the Brazilian War of Independence still stay strong?
Well, the national army, or imperial army during the monarchy, was divided into two branches: the 1st line, which was the army itself, and the 2nd line, made up of the local Militias and Ordinances inherited from colonial times. While the Imperial Army was mostly loyal to emperor Pedro/Peter I at that time, the local elites could still have some power to revolt.
 
Could there be British style Compensated Emancipation? It was attempted in French colonies, in the 1830's and The Netherlands.
 
Could there be British style Compensated Emancipation? It was attempted in French colonies, in the 1830's and The Netherlands.
I don't think this could happen. The recently independent Brazil was in a very bad financial situation, as king John VI literally emptied our bank's coffers before going back to Portugal.
 
I hadn't heard of that. Thanks for teaching me. I know the Netherlands created a national sales tax, to allow their liberation.
 
Well, the national army, or imperial army during the monarchy, was divided into two branches: the 1st line, which was the army itself, and the 2nd line, made up of the local Militias and Ordinances inherited from colonial times. While the Imperial Army was mostly loyal to emperor Pedro/Peter I at that time, the local elites could still have some power to revolt.
maybe one way to combat this is giving the option to enlist in the army?if a slave serves in the army for a time x he is free. This will give the government the manpower to deal with any revolt. In conjunction with Dom Pedro I having his powers restricted and Bonifacio in controlling the government of the nation, the necessary reforms will pass much faster.
 
maybe one way to combat this is giving the option to enlist in the army?if a slave serves in the army for a time x he is free. This will give the government the manpower to deal with any revolt. In conjunction with Dom Pedro I having his powers restricted and Bonifacio in controlling the government of the nation, the necessary reforms will pass much faster.
Speaking of that, I wonder how this timeline's imperial Constitution could be. Could Peter and the Assembly arrive to a compromise, so he doesn't close it?
 
Speaking of that, I wonder how this timeline's imperial Constitution could be. Could Peter and the Assembly arrive to a compromise, so he doesn't close it?
perhaps, what each one wanted was quite different. A more normal pedro who understands that the best situation in the country is to act a few times, interfering a little here and there. The constitution would stay pretty much the same with maybe him having some powers. Which would allow him to stay in Brazil and not get kicked out. Because cisplatin would not be lost and bonifacio and company were good administrators
 
Another thing about Bonifácio is that he is responsible for having the idea of the name of the current Brazilian capital.
 
perhaps, what each one wanted was quite different. A more normal pedro who understands that the best situation in the country is to act a few times, interfering a little here and there. The constitution would stay pretty much the same with maybe him having some powers. Which would allow him to stay in Brazil and not get kicked out. Because cisplatin would not be lost and bonifacio and company were good administrators
Another interesting factor is the right to vote. While his methods were authoritarian, Peter sympathized with liberal ideas, and his granted Constitution was more liberal than the Assembly's in some ways, but specially when it comes to vote: while the Assembly's project granted the right to vote only to those with an annual income equivalent to 150 bushels of manioc flour. The only people who could have this much land for manioc were the landlords who had to support many slaves.

Also, the Assembly Constitution gave the government the mandate to protect slavery as an institution (the emperor's constitution did not prohibit slavery, but it did not protect it either).

It would be interesting to see what kind of Constitution we could have....
 
Another interesting factor is the right to vote. While his methods were authoritarian, Peter sympathized with liberal ideas, and his granted Constitution was more liberal than the Assembly's in some ways, but specially when it comes to vote: while the Assembly's project granted the right to vote only to those with an annual income equivalent to 150 bushels of manioc flour. The only people who could have this much land for manioc were the landlords who had to support many slaves.

Also, the Assembly Constitution gave the government the mandate to protect slavery as an institution (the emperor's constitution did not prohibit slavery, but it did not protect it either).

It would be interesting to see what kind of Constitution we could have....
these would be the cases that he as emperor should interfere
 
these would be the cases that he as emperor should interfere
Yes, I believe we could see a alliance between Bonifácio, the emperor and other progressive members of the assembly to try to approve at least some of their projects. However, even if the Constitutional Assembly was still closed, the repercussions could be different if there's a significant part of it supporting the emperor.
 
Yes, I believe we could see a alliance between Bonifácio, the emperor and other progressive members of the assembly to try to approve at least some of their projects. However, even if the Constitutional Assembly was still closed, the repercussions could be different if there's a significant part of it supporting the emperor.
maybe not closed, but temporarily stopped until new deals take place?
With the cisplatin war won, post-war popularity would allow for a more liberal constitution.
 
maybe not closed, but temporarily stopped until new deals take place?
With the cisplatin war won, post-war popularity would allow for a more liberal constitution.
If things temporarily stop that means the Constituent Assembly has by itself temporarily adjourned.
 
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