When the Wind Blew: a P&S Open Thread

Runways in states with frightful winters would be more hardened, just to survive the climate. The runways at Loring or Minot, say, would be a lot tougher than, say, Castle's or Dyess'.
 
Yes, it would. Bases in the Northern Tier would have very strongly built runways that would tough out very harsh winters-not unlike a Soviet Arctic Staging Base (which would likely take a ground burst in return). Just remember that any airport with a runway of 10,000 feet or more can take B-52s, and many were in fact, dispersal fields for SAC-and some were former SAC bases themselves (Lincoln in Nebraska, Roswell/Walker in New Mexico, Clinton-Sherman in Oklahoma, and so on).
 
Yes, it would. Bases in the Northern Tier would have very strongly built runways that would tough out very harsh winters-not unlike a Soviet Arctic Staging Base (which would likely take a ground burst in return). Just remember that any airport with a runway of 10,000 feet or more can take B-52s, and many were in fact, dispersal fields for SAC-and some were former SAC bases themselves (Lincoln in Nebraska, Roswell/Walker in New Mexico, Clinton-Sherman in Oklahoma, and so on).

That part I knew ;)

I'm actually kind of surprised how many runways in Texas fit that criteria, because I wouldn't think Texas would be an ideal location for backup runways for SAC forces.
 
With two SAC bases in the state (Dyess and Carswell), they would need dispersal fields. Amarillo IAP used to be a SAC base up until its closure, and Sheppard AFB had a molehole and alert ramp as it also used to be SAC until ATC took over-they still have the molehole on Google Earth imagery. Biggs AAF at El Paso used to be a SAC base, and there's also civilian airports like D/FW International, Houston Intercontinental, maybe San Antonio IAP. Some from Dyess would probably go to Roswell (the AAF became Walker AFB until it closed in '67), while some of Carswell's bombers would go to Clinton-Sherman in OK: it was also a SAC base until it closed, and was kept on as a dispersal or recovery field. SAC would keep tabs on closed bases, checking on the condition of runways, taxiways, fuel storage, etc.. Just in case they needed to disperse the bombers and to serve as recovery/reconstitution bases. Nationwide? SAC had over forty civilian airports that they could use, and that's not counting the Air Force bases that could also support dispersal operations.
 
That part I knew ;)

I'm actually kind of surprised how many runways in Texas fit that criteria, because I wouldn't think Texas would be an ideal location for backup runways for SAC forces.



I think what Texas lacked in convenience for sac it made up for with energetic representation in the US Senate and House of Representatives.
 
A pair of rainy Sundays meant that I got to hit two items on my checklist. The first was to read Arc Light, which I did in a single day, because I was so hooked, even though I found it to be a bit unrealistic on a couple of smaller plot points. Utterly convincing in the larger strokes, and definitely gave me a shiver or two.

The second was to watch the Moors Murders documentary on Amazon Prime and bloody hell, Hinckley and Brady were absolute sadists. Leslie Ann's story nearly made me break down. I can understand why the police were so eager to empty a crapload of rounds into each of them in the Regicide chapter. And two families never got the closure of a funeral for their kids--Brady's two secrets.

Bastards.
 
The second was to watch the Moors Murders documentary on Amazon Prime and bloody hell, Hinckley and Brady were absolute sadists. Leslie Ann's story nearly made me break down. I can understand why the police were so eager to empty a crapload of rounds into each of them in the Regicide chapter. And two families never got the closure of a funeral for their kids--Brady's two secrets.

Bastards.

Yeah, I agree about Hinckley and Brady--the tape of Lesley Ann (that's the correct spelling) begging to go home while being assaulted was so horrifying the even the detectives on her case (and many hardened police officers) broke down crying in court; imagine her mother having to listen to that...

Makes me wish Myra Hindley and Ian Brady (that's the correct spelling there, too) had been the last people executed--they were more than deserving of it, IMO...
 
Friend of mine watched Threads for the first time recently at my place. Reminded me of this timeline(s) and the Old saying that ‘the worse thing than dying in a nuclear war is surviving one’.
 
Personally I'd like to see the story from the TV and radio perspective. I know some of the stories have touched upon it in part, but can it work for a whole story?
 
Yeah, I agree about Hinckley and Brady--the tape of Lesley Ann (that's the correct spelling) begging to go home while being assaulted was so horrifying the even the detectives on her case (and many hardened police officers) broke down crying in court; imagine her mother having to listen to that...

Makes me wish Myra Hindley and Ian Brady (that's the correct spelling there, too) had been the last people executed--they were more than deserving of it, IMO...
The Yorkshire Ripper, Peter Sutcliffe, died of COVID a few days ago.
 
Between myself and Chipperback, you probably could assemble a decent one.
Personally I'd like to see the story from the TV and radio perspective. I know some of the stories have touched upon it in part, but can it work for a whole story?

It definitely could be done.

Start with the different types of people involved: reporters, producers, anchors, disc jockeys, engineers, and others.

What would it be like covering the buildup in a major city, or the buildup and aftermath in a small town?

Since Cleveland survived, what might it be like working for one of the network TV affiliates, or major radio stations, or even for the Plain Dealer newspaper?

It would be helpful to have worked as a reporter or in another capacity during that era, but there are plenty of people around who worked those jobs and are still alive whom you could reach out to and talk with.

There's plenty of rich storytelling material to work with here...the only limits really are the ones you put on yourself.
 
It definitely could be done.

Start with the different types of people involved: reporters, producers, anchors, disc jockeys, engineers, and others.

What would it be like covering the buildup in a major city, or the buildup and aftermath in a small town?

Since Cleveland survived, what might it be like working for one of the network TV affiliates, or major radio stations, or even for the Plain Dealer newspaper?

It would be helpful to have worked as a reporter or in another capacity during that era, but there are plenty of people around who worked those jobs and are still alive whom you could reach out to and talk with.

There's plenty of rich storytelling material to work with here...the only limits really are the ones you put on yourself.
What I meant is that he and I both had substantial parts in our stories where media were involved.

And I'm not tackling a second storyline. One is enough.
 
What I meant is that he and I both had substantial parts in our stories where media were involved.

And I'm not tackling a second storyline. One is enough.
Never meant to suggest either of you needed to. My response was to the OP, suggesting that if anyone was motivated to write such a story it certainly could be done.
FWIW, if I had the time myself I might have given it a go....
 
Question- could you get off the San Andreas by dropping a nuke on it?

What about that huge chunk of land in the Canaries that if it slips would cause huge Tsaumani's in N America?
 
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