We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists

Andrew Jackson wins! Looking forward to his Presidency. You can imagine it will be anything but boring. Sad Clay didn't win a second term but he can always run again if he wants
 
Chapter Twenty-Seven: The Presidency of Andrew Jackson, 1829-1833
Chapter Twenty-Seven: The Presidency of Andrew Jackson, 1829-1833

President Andrew Jackson
As he entered office, Jackson was perhaps America's most controversial president up to that point. Detractors pointed out how that unlike his six predecessors, Jackson had been elected almost solely on his military record and the resulting popularity, rather than his political achievements or notoriety. This caused many of his opponents to worry, as the memories of Napoleon Bonaparte were still fresh in the minds of many. The insult of King Andrew I became popular among Jackson's opponents. In some ways, Jackson earned this moniker. He used the presidential veto to amount that was unprecedented. He would also appoint cronies to political office and other important jobs more so than any of the previous presidents. Despite this, the people continued to love Andrew Jackson, and unwaveringly viewed him as the champion of the common man. To this day, Jackson and his legacy is clouded with much debate, ranging from viewing him as the bringer of a new age of democracy to the unscrupulous back-biter who hurt America in so many ways. Wherever one stands in their opinion of Jackson, it is impossible to deny the crucial role he played in American history, as well as the history of several others nations and groups.

A particularly prevalent and popular Liberty cartoon that attacked Jackson as a monarch in the model of Napoleon
Coming into office, Jackson's domineering and aggressive personality easily made rivals, even within his own party. In no case was the latter claim made more clear than that of John C. Calhoun and his Republican Party. As many had expected, Calhoun continued to bear a grudge against Jackson for stealing the Democratic-Republican presidential nomination from him, and Calhoun presumed this also extended to the presidency considering Jackson's victory in that race. This split was only furthered with Jackson's actions when in office. Contrary to what Calhoun had expected, Jackson did not show unreasonable favoritism towards the Deep South, and sometimes even accepted policies that would hurt that region. Now burning with anger, Calhoun would declare his separation from the Democratic-Republican Party, and the formation of his own party, known as the Republican Party. In response to this, Jackson would rename the Democratic-Republicans into the Democratic Party, a move many modern historians assume he would have made eventually even without this prerogative. Calhoun would joined by others in this movement, such as fellow South Carolina senator Robert C. Hayne and Georgia senator George Troup, but contrary to what Calhoun had expected, not all of the Southern congressmen rallied around him, with such prominent figures as Vice-President William R. King of Alabama and President Pro Tempore John Forsyth of Georgia remaining loyal to Jackson and the Democratic Party. Further aggravating Calhoun, many of his fellow Republicans frequently voted with the Democrats, preventing the party from being the roadblock he intended it to be and ensuring continued Democratic rule over the government in most cases.
gmt2.jpg

John Calhoun, Robert Hayne, and George Troup: three of the most prominent Republicans
Further division and strife would be caused within the nation over the bank battle. Hoping to test the strength of Jackson and his Democratic Party in wake of the recent divide, and well aware that they would have to do it eventually, the Liberty Party urged president of the Second Bank of the United State, Nicholas Biddle, who had succeeded Albert Gallatin as president in 1826, to ask to have the bank rechartered now. Eventually agreeing, Biddle would do as planned and ask for Congress to renew the bank's charter now. Seeing an opportunity to destroy the bank, which he fiercely opposed, Jackson urged his supporters in Congress to approve of doing the rechartering now. Now approved, the Liberty Party brought it before the House. Despite Jackson's best efforts, and the hard fighting against the bill led by James Polk, the Republicans, in an effort to spite Jackson, voted in favor, and it passed the House. Ultimately, it would be in the Senate were the rechartering meet it's fate. Controlled by the Democrats for the first time since John Randolph, and where far fewer defections to the Republican Party had occurred, it hardly took President Pro Tempore Forsyth any effort to ensure the bill's demise. This was in spite of some Democratic defections, led by Maryland Senator Samuel Smith.

Nicholas Biddle and Samuel Smith, a political cartoon praising Jackson destruction of the bank, and John Forsyth and James Polk
It was the wake of the bank battle that again Jackson would experience strife within his own party, although the underlying conditions had been there for a while. It what became known as "the Great Shift", many of Jackson's former Democratic allies would switch party allegiance over to the Liberty Party. Among these were Virginia's Governor Littleton Tazewell, Virginia Senator John Tyler, Chair of the House Judicial Committee and Virginia Representative William C. Rives, Maryland Senator Samuel Smith, North Carolina Senator Willie P. Mangum, Tennessee Governor Sam Houston, Tennessee Senator Hugh L. White, and Tennessee Representative John Bell. Further concern was raised for Jackson when Liberty Party candidate Davy Crockett defeated his Democratic candidate Felix Grundy to fill the Tennessee Senate seat vacated by John Eaton in 1829, which was considered the heart of Democratic territory. Among the causes for these shifts were belief that Jackson truly had overstepped his boundaries as president, as well as Jackson's abrasive personality and political favoritism. While this movement gained some traction among the political class, Jackson was relieved to know that seemed to fail to gain root among the general populace, which Jackson was well aware made up his most crucial base.
f2e3a764ac260432328ec518bb0e1c93.jpg

Littleton Tazewell, John Tyler, and Sam Houston, three of the most prominent men in "The Great Shift"
It was as a result of "The Great Shift" that Henry Clay, who had returned as a Kentucky Senator in 1829, gained the opportunity he had been waiting for. With the Senate temporarily controlled by Jackson's opponents, if at least three Republicans held firm in their opposition to Jackson, Clay believed he could pass an official censure for the president, based on his actions in the aftermath of the bank battle. Hoping for the best, Clay introduced his censure into the Senate. And as he had hoped, three Republicans, Calhoun, Hayne, and Troup, supported him in his efforts, and the censure was narrowly passed, ensuring a blemish was attached to Jackson's name, even though it held little practical effect. For the first time in his presidency, Jackson's opponents had been able to successful bring and hold something against him, even if it was feeble at best.

A picture of Clay's censure of Jackson, now housed in the National Archives
For the first time since 1798, a new cabinet position was created, although it was not a new job. Instead, Jackson would promote the office of Postmaster General to the cabinet position in 1829, although it had existed since the time of George Washington. For it, he would place close political ally John H. Eaton into the position. This appointment would come under much fire, as many claimed that Eaton lacked any real credentials for the job, and had merely been placed into the office due to his friendship with Jackson. Prying into Eaton's personal life, it was also revealed that Eaton's wife, Peggy, did not have a stainless moral character, and rumors were circulated that in her youth and life as a young adult, she had been sexually promiscuous, with some even going as far as to claim that she had served as a prostitute in her father's bar. Despite this, Jackson held firm to his nominee, and would ultimately see to his successful appointment. In many ways, Eaton's appointment could serve as an effective summary of Jackson's time in office thus far, hard fought and very personal, but ultimately successful.

Postmaster General John H. Eaton
Jackson and his Cabinet:
President: Andrew Jackson
Vice-President: William R. King
Secretary of State: Lewis Cass
Secretary of the Treasury: Levi Woodbury
Secretary of War: Edward Livingston
Attorney General: Roger B. Taney
Secretary of the Navy: James Buchanan
Postmaster General: John H. Eaton
 

Ficboy

Banned
Chapter Twenty-Seven: The Presidency of Andrew Jackson, 1829-1833

President Andrew Jackson
As he entered office, Jackson was perhaps America's most controversial president up to that point. Detractors pointed out how that unlike his six predecessors, Jackson had been elected almost solely on his military record and the resulting popularity, rather than his political achievements or notoriety. This caused many of his opponents to worry, as the memories of Napoleon Bonaparte were still fresh in the minds of many. The insult of King Andrew I became popular among Jackson's opponents. In some ways, Jackson earned this moniker. He used the presidential veto to amount that was unprecedented. He would also appoint cronies to political office and other important jobs more so than any of the previous presidents. Despite this, the people continued to love Andrew Jackson, and unwaveringly viewed him as the champion of the common man. To this day, Jackson and his legacy is clouded with much debate, ranging from viewing him as the bringer of a new age of democracy to the unscrupulous back-biter who hurt America in so many ways. Wherever one stands in their opinion of Jackson, it is impossible to deny the crucial role he played in American history, as well as the history of several others nations and groups.

A particularly prevalent and popular Liberty cartoon that attacked Jackson as a monarch in the model of Napoleon
Coming into office, Jackson's domineering and aggressive personality easily made rivals, even within his own party. In no case was the latter claim made more clear than that of John C. Calhoun and his Republican Party. As many had expected, Calhoun continued to bear a grudge against Jackson for stealing the Democratic-Republican presidential nomination from him, and Calhoun presumed this also extended to the presidency considering Jackson's victory in that race. This split was only furthered with Jackson's actions when in office. Contrary to what Calhoun had expected, Jackson did not show unreasonable favoritism towards the Deep South, and sometimes even accepted policies that would hurt that region. Now burning with anger, Calhoun would declare his separation from the Democratic-Republican Party, and the formation of his own party, known as the Republican Party. In response to this, Jackson would rename the Democratic-Republicans into the Democratic Party, a move many modern historians assume he would have made eventually even without this prerogative. Calhoun would joined by others in this movement, such as fellow South Carolina senator Robert C. Hayne and Georgia senator George Troup, but contrary to what Calhoun had expected, not all of the Southern congressmen rallied around him, with such prominent figures as Vice-President William R. King of Alabama and President Pro Tempore John Forsyth of Georgia remaining loyal to Jackson and the Democratic Party. Further aggravating Calhoun, many of his fellow Republicans frequently voted with the Democrats, preventing the party from being the roadblock he intended it to be and ensuring continued Democratic rule over the government in most cases.
View attachment 581330
John Calhoun, Robert Hayne, and George Troup: three of the most prominent Republicans
Further division and strife would be caused within the nation over the bank battle. Hoping to test the strength of Jackson and his Democratic Party in wake of the recent divide, and well aware that they would have to do it eventually, the Liberty Party urged president of the Second Bank of the United State, Nicholas Biddle, who had succeeded Albert Gallatin as president in 1826, to ask to have the bank rechartered now. Eventually agreeing, Biddle would do as planned and ask for Congress to renew the bank's charter now. Seeing an opportunity to destroy the bank, which he fiercely opposed, Jackson urged his supporters in Congress to approve of doing the rechartering now. Now approved, the Liberty Party brought it before the House. Despite Jackson's best efforts, and the hard fighting against the bill led by James Polk, the Republicans, in an effort to spite Jackson, voted in favor, and it passed the House. Ultimately, it would be in the Senate were the rechartering meet it's fate. Controlled by the Democrats for the first time since John Randolph, and where far fewer defections to the Republican Party had occurred, it hardly took President Pro Tempore Forsyth any effort to ensure the bill's demise. This was in spite of some Democratic defections, led by Maryland Senator Samuel Smith.

Nicholas Biddle and Samuel Smith, a political cartoon praising Jackson destruction of the bank, and John Forsyth and James Polk
It was the wake of the bank battle that again Jackson would experience strife within his own party, although the underlying conditions had been there for a while. It what became known as "the Great Shift", many of Jackson's former Democratic allies would switch party allegiance over to the Liberty Party. Among these were Virginia's Governor Littleton Tazewell, Virginia Senator John Tyler, Chair of the House Judicial Committee and Virginia Representative William C. Rives, Maryland Senator Samuel Smith, North Carolina Senator Willie P. Mangum, Tennessee Governor Sam Houston, Tennessee Senator Hugh L. White, and Tennessee Representative John Bell. Further concern was raised for Jackson when Liberty Party candidate Davy Crockett defeated his Democratic candidate Felix Grundy to fill the Tennessee Senate seat vacated by John Eaton in 1829, which was considered the heart of Democratic territory. Among the causes for these shifts were belief that Jackson truly had overstepped his boundaries as president, as well as Jackson's abrasive personality and political favoritism. While this movement gained some traction among the political class, Jackson was relieved to know that seemed to fail to gain root among the general populace, which Jackson was well aware made up his most crucial base.
View attachment 581346

Littleton Tazewell, John Tyler, and Sam Houston, three of the most prominent men in "The Great Shift"
It was as a result of "The Great Shift" that Henry Clay, who had returned as a Kentucky Senator in 1829, gained the opportunity he had been waiting for. With the Senate temporarily controlled by Jackson's opponents, if at least three Republicans held firm in their opposition to Jackson, Clay believed he could pass an official censure for the president, based on his actions in the aftermath of the bank battle. Hoping for the best, Clay introduced his censure into the Senate. And as he had hoped, three Republicans, Calhoun, Hayne, and Troup, supported him in his efforts, and the censure was narrowly passed, ensuring a blemish was attached to Jackson's name, even though it held little practical effect. For the first time in his presidency, Jackson's opponents had been able to successful bring and hold something against him, even if it was feeble at best.

A picture of Clay's censure of Jackson, now housed in the National Archives
For the first time since 1798, a new cabinet position was created, although it was not a new job. Instead, Jackson would promote the office of Postmaster General to the cabinet position in 1829, although it had existed since the time of George Washington. For it, he would place close political ally John H. Eaton into the position. This appointment would come under much fire, as many claimed that Eaton lacked any real credentials for the job, and had merely been placed into the office due to his friendship with Jackson. Prying into Eaton's personal life, it was also revealed that Eaton's wife, Peggy, did not have a stainless moral character, and rumors were circulated that in her youth and life as a young adult, she had been sexually promiscuous, with some even going as far as to claim that she had served as a prostitute in her father's bar. Despite this, Jackson held firm to his nominee, and would ultimately see to his successful appointment. In many ways, Eaton's appointment could serve as an effective summary of Jackson's time in office thus far, hard fought and very personal, but ultimately successful.

Postmaster General John H. Eaton
Jackson and his Cabinet:
President: Andrew Jackson
Vice-President: William R. King
Secretary of State: Lewis Cass
Secretary of the Treasury: Levi Woodbury
Secretary of War: Edward Livingston
Attorney General: Roger B. Taney
Secretary of the Navy: James Buchanan
Postmaster General: John H. Eaton
You're back. Good job with your timeline.
 
And we have a three-party system again. Neat. And liking how Jackson was again responsible for the split of the Democratic-Republicans, if under different circumstances than OTL.
 

Ficboy

Banned
I have some ideas for it, but it is not fully fleshed and written out yet. If there is anything or anyone that someone wants to see, just put in a reply and I'll see what I can do.
So given the altered political climate in We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists I think we could focus on the border states of Kentucky and Missouri as well as Maryland. Texas isn't going to join the United States as you mentioned but perhaps you could focus on their role during and after the alternate Civil War.

Also I think you should capitalize the "are" and "all" in the title and make a slight alteration to the prologue which is missing an s in the paragraph that has the title.
 

Ficboy

Banned
You forgot to capitalize the "are" and "all" in the prologue that features the title of your timeline by the way.
 
Chapter Twenty-Eight: The Election of 1832
Chapter Twenty-Eight: The Election of 1832

A Liberty Party political cartoon attacking Jackson as a buffoon unfit to lead a government
In the wake of four years of a Jackson presidency, much had changed in America. A whole new political party had been founded, bringing a return to America's three party system, and the party allegiances of many men had switched. Perhaps never before in the history of the country had there been a more controversial president, but yet the people still loved him, as well as almost all of the Democratic Party, as many of his opponents had by now switched over to the Republican or Liberty Parties. As such, coming into the 1832 Democratic nominating caucus, which would be the final time that the Democrats used the caucus system to select their candidate, Jackson faced no opposition to his renomination. A man who did, however, was current Vice-President William R. King. King had remained loyal to Jackson and the Democratic Party, if just barely, following Calhoun's formation of the Republican Party. Despite this, many were claiming that King had Republican sympathies and should be dumped from the ticket. Names mentioned ranged from Southerners like President Pro Tempore John Forysth, Attorney General Roger B. Taney, Secretary of War Edward Livingston, or Virginia Representative and 1820 Democratic-Republican candidate Philip P. Barbour, to northerners like New Jersey Senator Mahlon Dickerson or Secretary of the Treasury Levi Woodbury. Ultimately, the failure of these efforts to coordinate resulted in King managing to remain on the ticket, if barely. Upon hearing word of King's renomination, Jackson would note "Despite his presence in my administration reminding me of a rattlesnake under a rock, I will tolerate his retention if only to keep the southern vote."

Lithographs made of Andrew Jackson and William King for the presidential election
The Liberty Party, meanwhile, found out the negative effects of the recent growth of senior party leadership in this election. In this election, they would use the nominating convention, rather than the nominating caucus, to decide their candidate, the first time a major party had done this in American history. As the result of "The Great Shift", many new and ambitious politicians had entered into the Liberty Party, some of whom had fostered rivalries with other Liberty Party members before switching to join the party. One effect of this was undermining the candidacy of Henry Clay, who was seeking renomination by his party and had made many rivals within the former Democratic-Republican Party during his presidency. As a result of this, a significant enough block of opposition was formed to Clay to block his being nominated for the presidency. Following this failure, many candidates would throw their names into contention, including Daniel Webster, Thomas Hart Benton, Littleton Tazewell, and even Nicholas Biddle, but none were able to gain enough traction. Eventually, after much debate, it was decided on that Massachusetts Senator John Quincy Adams would be the party's nominee for president, but with an interesting catch. Although Adams would be the sole presidential candidate for the Liberty Party, he would have three different running-mates. In the Southern states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, Adams ran with Virginia Senator James Barbour. Out west, meanwhile, he ran with Kentucky Senator John J. Critteden in Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Illionis, Indiana, and Ohio. In the remaining states, Adams running-mate was New Jersey senator and former Navy Secretary Samuel L. Southard. Although the Liberty Party were well aware that if their strategy worked, and the different tickets won each their respective areas, that only Adams would be elected president and the vice-presidential election would be thrown to the Senate, where almost certainly King would be selected, they were willing to give up the vice-presidency if it meant winning the presidency.

John Quincy Adams and his running mates, James Barbour, John Crittenden, and Samuel Southard
The Republicans, meanwhile, were well aware that they remained a regional party and that they stood no chance of winning the presidency. Their hope was, however, to deny Jackson enough southern electoral votes as to be able to play king-maker in the House of Representatives when they gathered to choose the president. To the surprise of no one, Calhoun was chosen by the nominating caucus to run as their candidate for the presidency. The real question lay in who they would choose for the vice-presidency. Ultimately, they would choose former Virginia governor John Floyd. With this move, the Republicans hoped to be seen as not only as a party for the Deep South, but for the upper South also, although in these states, which seemed likely to be subjected to the most contention in the election, the Republicans stood little chance.

John Calhoun and John Floyd
In an already crowded field, one more party tried to be nationally recognized. This would be the Anti-Masonic Party. Formed in the aftermath of several disappearances and likely murders of several prominent critics of Freemasonry, the Anti-Masonic Party tried to go beyond being just a one issue party. The also took on the label of an anti-corruption, anti-establishment party. They also voiced their support for internal improvements, higher tariffs, and stricter regulation of immigration, especially from non-Protestant countries. They claimed to be the champions of a free, peaceful America, reliant on no nation except itself. For their presidential candidate, they would nominate former Ohio representative John McLean, and nominated Pennsylvania's attorney general Amos Ellmaker for the vice-presidency.

John McLean and Amos Ellmaker
When the time came for campaigning, Jackson's campaign, headed by his nephew Andrew J. Donelson and newspapermen Francis P. Blair and Amos Kendall, focused on how Jackson had helped the common man, by doing things like fighting Washington's entrenched politicians, including even men from his own party, or by dissolving the national bank and establishing, smaller, more local ones. The Liberty Party, meanwhile, tried to be as unoffensive to as many voters as possible, well aware that Adams lacked the charisma of Jackson, as well as the hard-working underlings to do his campaigning. The Republicans, on the other hand, used fear tactics, claiming that all other candidates were secret abolitionists conniving to take away the slaves and rights of Southerners, as well as destroy their way of life by raising tariffs. The Anti-Masonic effectively just rambled and ranted against anything they opposed ranging from political elites to Catholic immigrants. This election became known as one of the most entertaining for the voters in history, as three out of the four main parties, the Democrats, the Republicans, and the Anti-Masonics, all delivered impassioned stump speeches quite frequently, much to the amusement of the attending audience, even more so when the speaker went off script and began spouting random rubbish, something which would have likely disgusted previous voters but now began to seem almost normal and expected in this hard-fought election, especially at smaller gatherings.
61eXlzcWctL._AC_SL1000_.jpg

Jackson's campaign managers: Andrew Donelson, Francis Blair, and Amos Kendall
When the campaigning finally reached its conclusion, and the time for voting finally arrived, the nation settled in for what was expected to be a close election. In a close electoral vote victory, Jackson was able to clinch 149 of the 145 electoral votes needed for victory, securing the states of Louisiana, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, Missouri, Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Indiana, Delaware, Illinois, and Pennsylvania. Placing second in both the popular and electoral vote would be Adams, who won 115 electoral votes from Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Kentucky, and Maine. Next came Calhoun and his Republicans, winning 22 electoral votes form South Carolina, Mississippi, and Alabama and narrowly failing in their goal to deny Jackson an electoral vote victory. Finally, there were the Anti-Masonic Party, who failed to win any electoral votes but won a respectable 6% of the popular vote. Thus, Jackson was given a second term in office, and everyone readied themselves for four more years under him.
 
Last edited:
Loving how crowded the election was, and Adams having three running mates depending on region.

On that note, however, the last sentence of the Liberty Party nominating section refers to them as Whigs. Might want to correct that.
 
Top