We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists

Ficboy

Banned
Since there was never a President Andrew Jackson and thus no Nullification Crisis of 1832-1833, I wonder how it affects the Civil War or whatever its called here.
 
Chapter Twenty-Five: The End of an Era
Chapter Twenty-Five: The End of an Era

Thomas Jefferson and John Adams in their old age
The year was 1826, and America had survived to her fiftieth anniversary. Through all the trials and hardships, conflicts and compromises, factions and feuding, the nation had held together to survive for 50 years. And two men had been there to witness it all. Friends since they first met to the very end, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson had stood side by side throughout the nation's history. While they may have had differing opinions on a variety of issues, they had not let that tear them apart or start a rift in their bond that was forged in the fiery trial of the American Revolution. Instead, they had gone on to form their own party, and under there combined sixteen years in office, America had grown from a wobbly, unstable nation to one economically prosperous and worthy of the mantle of nationhood. Of course, they had left issues unresolved. Slavery was still eating away at the heart of the nation, as well as ever increasing divides between the parties, but to any observer, it was clear that the two men had left the nation better off then how they had first found it. That, by now, was in the past. It had been a full twelve years since either man had held elected office. Both had returned to their home states in their final retirement, enjoying life surrounded by family and other ones who they held dear. And they had each other. In those twelve years, many letters had passed between the two great men, in which they poured out their hearts to each other. In his final letter to his beloved friend, Adams had clearly laid out the dwindling amount of men who remained from their revolutionary generation, "Gone, all gone. Many of the men by which we stood side by side have now gone on past this world, leaving us few remaining only with their dearly treasured memory, as well as the memories of when our young nation, with all her states truly united in one cause, independence, stood firmly together in protection of that most treasured ideal."
--------------
Monticello, Charlottesville, Virginia, 5:30 PM, July 4, 1826
A delirious Jefferson stirred back in consciousnesses, which over the last few hours he had repeatedly slipped in and out of. He looked around the room, which was now crowded with friends and other associates from over the years. Shame Adams isn't here, thought Jefferson as he fought inhale another breath. Despite the lack of his oldest still living friend, there were still many men present who Jefferson held dear. Most prominent among them being, of course, James Madison, the former president and Jefferson's loyal protege and political student. Clasping tightly to his arm was the woman held dear by both men, Dolley, husband to James and friend to Jefferson, who had her act almost as his first lady during his years in the presidency. Standing solemnly and erect behind the couple, who were already beginning to shed tears, was James Monroe. Ever the dutiful and capable party member, Jefferson had fully expected Monroe to have achieved the presidency by now, or at least the vice-presidency. But it was not be. Instead, that opportunity, if it was ever meant to be, had slipped him by, and Monroe had now too surrendered to a life of comfort in retirement.

Standing beside Monroe's silent figure was John S. Nicholas, the son of Jefferson's friend, neighbor, and the now late Supreme Court Associate Justice Wilson C. Nicholas. It was clear that despite his best efforts, his mind was drifting to other things. Jefferson could hardly blame the poor young fellow. At the tender age of 26, he had already been burdened with his father's crippling debts, brought on by land investments gone disastrously sour. Remembering that brought back a painful memory to Jefferson's mind. Relaxing on his porch and watching his grandchildren, he had received a letter from Wilson, asking him to endorse two of notes for his western land speculation, totaling $20,000. In the passion of the moment, he had chosen to disregard his friend's plea due to his political affiliation, as Wilson was a Democratic-Republican, and he a member of the Liberty Party. Of course, this had proved to be the right choice, as Wilson's terrible financial misadventures had later proved. Despite this, the memory had never ceased to haunt Jefferson, constantly reminding him of how he had betrayed a close friendship due to political divides.

Suddenly, a frightful coughing fit overcame the former president. After an intense few moments, Jefferson was more aware than ever that he had but few moments left. Hoping to get a last glance at everyone else present, he continued to scan his eyes over the room. Standing side by side were Secretary of State William H. Crawford and Secretary of the Treasury Nathaniel Macon. During his presidency, these two men had been two of his top champions in the Senate, always advocating for Liberty Party policy. Over the years, the two men had grown quite fond of the old founder, and when they received word of his ill conditions and that in all likelihood he would soon pass, both men had rapidly departed from Washington to see him one last time. Beside them were two men who had acted as Jefferson's secretaries over the years, William Short and Meriwether Lewis, both of whom had provided both writing aid and personal companionship in the time now past.

Finally, Jefferson's eyes rested on his daughter Martha, alongside his husband Thomas, who was now a Supreme Court Associate Justice, who was using his son, Thomas J. Randolph, to lean on as old age was beginning to fatigue his body. They were the only family he had present at his death, he thought. But then, walking into his view came Madison Hemmings, carrying a damp washcloth to place on his forehead. At his sight, the old founder was overwhelmed with a wave of emotion. Throughout his whole life, while he had publicly praised and espoused freedom, he had held in bondage his own children, as well as hundreds of other humans. And he wasn't in dire economic straits, like John Nicholas. Despite his constant struggles with debt throughout his life, in the end, he had managed to break out of that trap, and secure a small amount of money to pass on to his next of kin upon his passing.

Trying to speak as loudly as he could, which ultimately proved to be a raspy whisper, Jefferson called out, "Mr. Lewis, please bring me my will, as well as a quill and ink." Over the next few minutes, he would tell Lewis what to transcribe to his will. By the time he was finished, a new clause had been added to his will, freeing all his slaves upon his death, which was looking to be quite soon. With a feeble but determined hand, he would sign the updated document, before Short gently took the quill from his hand and placed it aside. With a feeling of completion rushing over his body, Jefferson declared, "Independence forever, freedom forever, equality forever." With that, he drew his last breath and passed away, leaving the room stunned into silence. A few moments later, John Adams, resting in his Quincy bedroom, would join him in death.
 

Ficboy

Banned
Chapter Twenty-Five: The End of an Era

Thomas Jefferson and John Adams in their old age
The year was 1826, and America had survived to her fiftieth anniversary. Through all the trials and hardships, conflicts and compromises, factions and feuding, the nation had held together to survive for 50 years. And two men had been there to witness it all. Friends since they first met to the very end, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson had stood side by side throughout the nation's history. While they may have had differing opinions on a variety of issues, they had not let that tear them apart or start a rift in their bond that was forged in the fiery trial of the American Revolution. Instead, they had gone on to form their own party, and under there combined sixteen years in office, America had grown from a wobbly, unstable nation to one economically prosperous and worthy of the mantle of nationhood. Of course, they had left issues unresolved. Slavery was still eating away at the heart of the nation, as well as ever increasing divides between the parties, but to any observer, it was clear that the two men had left the nation better off then how they had first found it. That, by now, was in the past. It had been a full twelve years since either man had held elected office. Both had returned to their home states in their final retirement, enjoying life surrounded by family and other ones who they held dear. And they had each other. In those twelve years, many letters had passed between the two great men, in which they poured out their hearts to each other. In his final letter to his beloved friend, Adams had clearly laid out the dwindling amount of men who remained from their revolutionary generation, "Gone, all gone. Many of the men by which we stood side by side have now gone on past this world, leaving us few remaining only with their dearly treasured memory, as well as the memories of when our young nation, with all her states truly united in one cause, independence, stood firmly together in protection of that most treasured ideal."
--------------
Monticello, Charlottesville, Virginia, 5:30 PM, July 4, 1826
A delirious Jefferson stirred back in consciousnesses, which over the last few hours he had repeatedly slipped in and out of. He looked around the room, which was now crowded with friends and other associates from over the years. Shame Adams isn't here, thought Jefferson as he fought inhale another breath. Despite the lack of his oldest still living friend, there were still many men present who Jefferson held dear. Most prominent among them being, of course, James Madison, the former president and Jefferson's loyal protege and political student. Clasping tightly to his arm was the woman held dear by both men, Dolley, husband to James and friend to Jefferson, who had her act almost as his first lady during his years in the presidency. Standing solemnly and erect behind the couple, who were already beginning to shed tears, was James Monroe. Ever the dutiful and capable party member, Jefferson had fully expected Monroe to have achieved the presidency by now, or at least the vice-presidency. But it was not be. Instead, that opportunity, if it was ever meant to be, had slipped him by, and Monroe had now too surrendered to a life of comfort in retirement.

Standing beside Monroe's silent figure was John S. Nicholas, the son of Jefferson's friend, neighbor, and the now late Supreme Court Associate Justice Wilson C. Nicholas. It was clear that despite his best efforts, his mind was drifting to other things. Jefferson could hardly blame the poor young fellow. At the tender age of 26, he had already been burdened with his father's crippling debts, brought on by land investments gone disastrously sour. Remembering that brought back a painful memory to Jefferson's mind. Relaxing on his porch and watching his grandchildren, he had received a letter from Wilson, asking him to endorse two of notes for his western land speculation, totaling $20,000. In the passion of the moment, he had chosen to disregard his friend's plea due to his political affiliation, as Wilson was a Democratic-Republican, and he a member of the Liberty Party. Of course, this had proved to be the right choice, as Wilson's terrible financial misadventures had later proved. Despite this, the memory had never ceased to haunt Jefferson, constantly reminding him of how he had betrayed a close friendship due to political divides.

Suddenly, a frightful coughing fit overcame the former president. After an intense few moments, Jefferson was more aware than ever that he had but few moments left. Hoping to get a last glance at everyone else present, he continued to scan his eyes over the room. Standing side by side were Secretary of State William H. Crawford and Secretary of the Treasury Nathaniel Macon. During his presidency, these two men had been two of his top champions in the Senate, always advocating for Liberty Party policy. Over the years, the two men had grown quite fond of the old founder, and when they received word of his ill conditions and that in all likelihood he would soon pass, both men had rapidly departed from Washington to see him one last time. Beside them were two men who had acted as Jefferson's secretaries over the years, William Short and Meriwether Lewis, both of whom had provided both writing aid and personal companionship in the time now past.

Finally, Jefferson's eyes rested on his daughter Martha, alongside his husband Thomas, who was now a Supreme Court Associate Justice, who was using his son, Thomas J. Randolph, to lean on as old age was beginning to fatigue his body. They were the only family he had present at his death, he thought. But then, walking into his view came Madison Hemmings, carrying a damp washcloth to place on his forehead. At his sight, the old founder was overwhelmed with a wave of emotion. Throughout his whole life, while he had publicly praised and espoused freedom, he had held in bondage his own children, as well as hundreds of other humans. And he wasn't in dire economic straits, like John Nicholas. Despite his constant struggles with debt throughout his life, in the end, he had managed to break out of that trap, and secure a small amount of money to pass on to his next of kin upon his passing.

Trying to speak as loudly as he could, which ultimately proved to be a raspy whisper, Jefferson called out, "Mr. Lewis, please bring me my will, as well as a quill and ink." Over the next few minutes, he would tell Lewis what to transcribe to his will. By the time he was finished, a new clause had been added to his will, freeing all his slaves upon his death, which was looking to be quite soon. With a feeble but determined hand, he would sign the updated document, before Short gently took the quill from his hand and placed it aside. With a feeling of completion rushing over his body, Jefferson declared, "Independence forever, freedom forever, equality forever." With that, he drew his last breath and passed away, leaving the room stunned into silence. A few moments later, John Adams, resting in his Quincy bedroom, would join him in death.
Man that's going to sadden so many Americans to see two of the most important Founding Fathers die. Speaking of which, so is there a Missouri Compromise? What happened to Andrew Jackson? Will there even be a Civil War in the first place? Will Texas become a state in the Union.
 
Man that's going to sadden so many Americans to see two of the most important Founding Fathers die. Speaking of which, so is there a Missouri Compromise? What happened to Andrew Jackson? Will there even be a Civil War in the first place? Will Texas become a state in the Union.
There is a Missouri Compromise equivalent ITTL, but it is different from the one IOTL. Currently, Andrew Jackson is a retired Major General in the U.S. Army, living at the Hermitage, enjoying his pension and plantation profits, and considering a presidential run (more on that in the next chapter). The answer to the other two are more major in terms of spoilers, so I will put them in a spoiler button
There will be a Civil War, and Texas will not become a state in the U.S. In a way, these two things are intertwined.
 

Ficboy

Banned
There is a Missouri Compromise equivalent ITTL, but it is different from the one IOTL. Currently, Andrew Jackson is a retired Major General in the U.S. Army, living at the Hermitage, enjoying his pension and plantation profits, and considering a presidential run (more on that in the next chapter). The answer to the other two are more major in terms of spoilers, so I will put them in a spoiler button
There will be a Civil War, and Texas will not become a state in the U.S. In a way, these two things are intertwined.
So what does the Missouri Compromise of We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists look like? Will Andrew Jackson still become president?

Texas honestly can't last long as an independent republic given how culturally intertwined it is with the rest of the South and it has very few resources. What does Manifest Destiny even look like and the best bet for the Southern states/Confederacy that secede are Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee and possibly Kentucky and Missouri.

Also, what books did you read to prepare for the timeline?
 
So what does the Missouri Compromise of We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists look like? Will Andrew Jackson still become president?

Texas honestly can't last long as an independent republic given how culturally intertwined it is with the rest of the South and it has very few resources. What does Manifest Destiny even look like and the best bet for the Southern states/Confederacy that secede are Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee and possibly Kentucky and Missouri.

Also, what books did you read to prepare for the timeline?
The ITTL equivalent of the Missouri Compromise is discussed in chapter 20. In short, Missouri enters as a slave state and Maine comes in as a free state, with there being no border line being drawn to prevent slavery from going farther north like IOTL. As for Jackson, I will again say that his presidential ambitions will be discussed in the next chapter. As for Texas, I just said they would not join the Union, not that they would stay an independent republic. They will have their own unique fate ITTL.

As for what books I read for this, the primary inspiration for this TL was Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis. Other books I looked at include Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow, John Adams by David McCullough, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson also by Joseph J. Ellis, James Madison: A Biography by Ralph Ketcham, James Madison by Richard Brookhiser, Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates by Brian Kilmeade, and The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, and Indian Allies by Alan Taylor.
 

Ficboy

Banned
The ITTL equivalent of the Missouri Compromise is discussed in chapter 20. In short, Missouri enters as a slave state and Maine comes in as a free state, with there being no border line being drawn to prevent slavery from going farther north like IOTL. As for Jackson, I will again say that his presidential ambitions will be discussed in the next chapter. As for Texas, I just said they would not join the Union, not that they would stay an independent republic. They will have their own unique fate ITTL.

As for what books I read for this, the primary inspiration for this TL was Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis. Other books I looked at include Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow, John Adams by David McCullough, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson also by Joseph J. Ellis, James Madison: A Biography by Ralph Ketcham, James Madison by Richard Brookhiser, Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates by Brian Kilmeade, and The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, and Indian Allies by Alan Taylor.
With there being no 36-30 line to prevent slavery from going westward it will inevitably trigger the Civil War and possibly much worse than OTL.

Judging by the appearance of the United States map sans Texas presumably they might go to war with Mexico and take all this territory for the Southwest and the Northwest will still be claimed.
 
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There is a Missouri Compromise equivalent ITTL, but it is different from the one IOTL. Currently, Andrew Jackson is a retired Major General in the U.S. Army, living at the Hermitage, enjoying his pension and plantation profits, and considering a presidential run (more on that in the next chapter). The answer to the other two are more major in terms of spoilers, so I will put them in a spoiler button
There will be a Civil War, and Texas will not become a state in the U.S. In a way, these two things are intertwined.
Does this mean that...

Independent Texas becomes swamped by Confederate exiles?

or that

Texas remians apart of Mexico?
 
Did you guys like my attempt at writing in a more novel-like style in the last chapter? Was it interesting and/or engaging? Keep in mind that even if it was good, I would probably only do something similar to that on few rather than many occasions to keep it unique.
 

Ficboy

Banned
Did you guys like my attempt at writing in a more novel-like style in the last chapter? Was it interesting and/or engaging? Keep in mind that even if it was good, I would probably only do something similar to that on few rather than many occasions to keep it unique.
Yes, it's pretty good.
 
Chapter Twenty-Six: The Election of 1828
Chapter Twenty-Six: The Election of 1828

Andrew Jackson delivering an impromptu speech as demanded by a crowd of his ravenous supporters. This speech would be notable for it being the first time a major candidate personally delivered a speech to the people as part of their campaign.
In the wake of Clay's less than inspiring term, many believed that it would be an uphill struggle for the ambitious Kentucky politician to manage to win the presidency again. Not only would he have to be renominated by the caucus while facing a fierce opponent in William H. Harrison, but he would also have to convince the people to give him another term after his first had fallen short of the expectations of many. For the moment, however, Clay focused on securing his renomination. Many in the nominating caucus were truly split on whether to give Clay another chance, or to trade him out for Harrison, who was much more popular with the people. Senators Thomas H. Benton, who served effectively as Harrison's campaign manager, and John J. Crittenden and James Barbour, who did the same for Clay, duked it out and played for delegates for the respective candidates. Come time for the vote, everyone knew it was going to be tight. Ultimately, the man that decided the caucus was Tennessee Representative Davy Crockett, casting his decisive vote for Clay and giving him the nomination. This caused much uproar within the party, as almost all had been expecting Crockett to cast his vote for his former commander. It was as a result of this that in the next election, a national convention rather than nominating caucus was chosen to pick the Liberty Party's candidates, a policy which would be adopted by the Democratic-Republicans in the 1836 election. For now, however, Clay has secured his renomination. The same went for Vice-President Webster, a candidate who Harrison actually supported, who managed to do it by a slightly larger margin, which caused Clay some slight embarrassment.
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23983048.jpg

Henry Clay and Daniel Webster
The Democratic-Republicans, meanwhile, were prepared for their own nominating caucus. Going into it, it appeared that John C. Calhoun was likely to receive the nomination, although he faced some minor opposition from men such as Alabama Senator William R.D. King and former Secretary of State William B. Giles, although neither of these men had approved of these efforts. In the opening moments of the caucus, however, two men would burst in side by side, claiming to deliver exciting and important news. The two men were Andrew J. Donelson and Francis P. Blair Sr., and hurriedly, despite being out of breath, the two men would announce that Andrew Jackson had sent them from his Tennessee home to announce his candidacy to the gathered men. Despite all the odds and opposition they had faced, including a freak storm, an overturned carriage, and an attempted robbery, the two men had arrived in time to inform the caucus of Jackson's decision. This would send shock waves throughout the gathered men, who agreed to postpone until later. This would give Donelson and Blair, alongside any other Jackson supporters in Washington, the time necessary to attempt to secure his candidacy. Reconvening the next day, Calhoun's certain nomination had vanished, and now it seemed Jackson was the man to beat. Despite the best last minute efforts of Calhoun and his supporters, Jackson would be nominated on the first ballot by no small majority. Fuming, Calhoun refused the offer to make him the vice-presidential nominee, with it instead passing to King, a fervent supporter of Calhoun.

Andrew Jackson and William King
With the Democratic-Republican nomination of Andrew Jackson, the worse fears for many in the Liberty Party were realized. Unlike many Democratic-Republicans like Calhoun or King, who only had truly strong support in the South, Jackson, due to his appeal to and popularity with the common man, threatened to flip states that had previously gone Liberty Party, including Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and even New York by the most dire reports. Combine this with Clay's quite unremarkable presidency, and the Democratic-Republicans finally believed they had managed to get their foot in the door and stood a very good chance of winning the presidency. This election also marked a resurgence in mudslinging tactics, which had last seen widespread use in 1800. Democratic-Republicans attacked Clay as a man more interested in drinking, dueling, and horse-racing than the presidency, while the Liberty Party portrayed Jackson a cruel butcher in warfare and a corrupt and naive buffoon in politics. Both men tried to make themselves appear as the people's candidate, although Jackson was decidedly more successful in this effort than Clay. Whenever presented with attacks from Clay, Jackson would portray it as Clay trying to silence the voice as the common man, who Jackson claimed was embodied in him.

A Democratic-Republican cartoon depicting Clay trying to sew shut the mouth of Jackson, who Democratic-Republicans claimed represented the people
When election day arrived, and the results started trickling in, both sides tensely held their breath. At first, it appeared Clay might win, securing both Kentucky and New York's electoral votes by a small margin. Jackson's side received encouragement when it was revealed Virginia, North Carolina, and Ohio had gone for him. As time passed, however, Jackson regained his lead, having 119 electoral votes to Clay's 114. With 131 electoral votes needed for victory, the nation waited with bated breath for the election returns from Pennsylvania, whose electoral votes would decide the election. After two days in tense waiting, the state was declared for Jackson, awarding him 28 electoral votes and the presidency. Jackson's final total for electoral votes was 147 coming from Louisiana, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Ohio, Illinois, and Pennsylvania. Clay, meanwhile, had 114 electoral votes from Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Kentucky, Maine, and Indiana. For the second time in the nation's history, a Democratic-Republican had been elected president of the United States. Also for the second time the nation had had a one term president, with Henry Clay joining John Randolph with that distinction.
 

Ficboy

Banned
Chapter Twenty-Six: The Election of 1828

Andrew Jackson delivering an impromptu speech as demanded by a crowd of his ravenous supporters. This speech would be notable for it being the first time a major candidate personally delivered a speech to the people as part of their campaign.
In the wake of Clay's less than inspiring term, many believed that it would be an uphill struggle for the ambitious Kentucky politician to manage to win the presidency again. Not only would he have to be renominated by the caucus while facing a fierce opponent in William H. Harrison, but he would also have to convince the people to give him another term after his first had fallen short of the expectations of many. For the moment, however, Clay focused on securing his renomination. Many in the nominating caucus were truly split on whether to give Clay another chance, or to trade him out for Harrison, who was much more popular with the people. Senators Thomas H. Benton, who served effectively as Harrison's campaign manager, and John J. Crittenden and James Barbour, who did the same for Clay, duked it out and played for delegates for the respective candidates. Come time for the vote, everyone knew it was going to be tight. Ultimately, the man that decided the caucus was Tennessee Representative Davy Crockett, casting his decisive vote for Clay and giving him the nomination. This caused much uproar within the party, as almost all had been expecting Crockett to cast his vote for his former commander. It was as a result of this that in the next election, a national convention rather than nominating caucus was chosen to pick the Liberty Party's candidates, a policy which would be adopted by the Democratic-Republicans in the 1836 election. For now, however, Clay has secured his renomination. The same went for Vice-President Webster, a candidate who Harrison actually supported, who managed to do it by a slightly larger margin, which caused Clay some slight embarrassment.
View attachment 579203 View attachment 579206
Henry Clay and Daniel Webster
The Democratic-Republicans, meanwhile, were prepared for their own nominating caucus. Going into it, it appeared that John C. Calhoun was likely to receive the nomination, although he faced some minor opposition from men such as Alabama Senator William R.D. King and former Secretary of State William B. Giles, although neither of these men had approved of these efforts. In the opening moments of the caucus, however, two men would burst in side by side, claiming to deliver exciting and important news. The two men were Andrew J. Donelson and Francis P. Blair Sr., and hurriedly, despite being out of breath, the two men would announce that Andrew Jackson had sent them from his Tennessee home to announce his candidacy to the gathered men. Despite all the odds and opposition they had faced, including a freak storm, an overturned carriage, and an attempted robbery, the two men had arrived in time to inform the caucus of Jackson's decision. This would send shock waves throughout the gathered men, who agreed to postpone until later. This would give Donelson and Blair, alongside any other Jackson supporters in Washington, the time necessary to attempt to secure his candidacy. Reconvening the next day, Calhoun's certain nomination had vanished, and now it seemed Jackson was the man to beat. Despite the best last minute efforts of Calhoun and his supporters, Jackson would be nominated on the first ballot by no small majority. Fuming, Calhoun refused the offer to make him the vice-presidential nominee, with it instead passing to King, a fervent supporter of Calhoun.

Andrew Jackson and William King
With the Democratic-Republican nomination of Andrew Jackson, the worse fears for many in the Liberty Party were realized. Unlike many Democratic-Republicans like Calhoun or King, who only had truly strong support in the South, Jackson, due to his appeal to and popularity with the common man, threatened to flip states that had previously gone Liberty Party, including Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and even New York by the most dire reports. Combine this with Clay's quite unremarkable presidency, and the Democratic-Republicans finally believed they had managed to get their foot in the door and stood a very good chance of winning the presidency. This election also marked a resurgence in mudslinging tactics, which had last seen widespread use in 1800. Democratic-Republicans attacked Clay as a man more interested in drinking, dueling, and horse-racing than the presidency, while the Liberty Party portrayed Jackson a cruel butcher in warfare and a corrupt and naive buffoon in politics. Both men tried to make themselves appear as the people's candidate, although Jackson was decidedly more successful in this effort than Clay. Whenever presented with attacks from Clay, Jackson would portray it as Clay trying to silence the voice as the common man, who Jackson claimed was embodied in him.

A Democratic-Republican cartoon depicting Clay trying to sew shut the mouth of Jackson, who Democratic-Republicans claimed represented the people
When election day arrived, and the results started trickling in, both sides tensely held their breath. At first, it appeared Clay might win, securing both Kentucky and New York's electoral votes by a small margin. Jackson's side received encouragement when it was revealed Virginia, North Carolina, and Ohio had gone for him. As time passed, however, Jackson regained his lead, having 119 electoral votes to Clay's 114. With 131 electoral votes needed for victory, the nation waited with bated breath for the election returns from Pennsylvania, whose electoral votes would decide the election. After two days in tense waiting, the state was declared for Jackson, awarding him 28 electoral votes and the presidency. Jackson's final total for electoral votes was 147 coming from Louisiana, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Ohio, Illinois, and Pennsylvania. Clay, meanwhile, had 114 electoral votes from Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Kentucky, Maine, and Indiana. For the second time in the nation's history, a Democratic-Republican had been elected president of the United States. Also for the second time the nation had had a one term president, with Henry Clay joining John Randolph with that distinction.
Looks like Andrew Jackson pulled off the ultimate upset. Civil War is coming minus Texas that is.
 
Too bad Clay didn't have anyone to make a corrupt bargain with this time around.

Looking forward to Jackson's presidency. Also, his representatives' trip to the caucus sounds like it'd make a great story on its own.
 
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