Union of the Crowns... in the 1440s?

Deleted member 204809

Assume the Yorkist line fizzles out before 1440, that the Duke of Exeter dies prematurely, and that the Somersets still win their power struggle against the Duke of Gloucester. If Henry VI were to die prematurely without his son (or his wife's son) being born, is it correct to say that the Somersets would take the throne? I fail to see any alternative candidates who could challenge the power base they would possess. Consider that Joan Beaufort was married to James I of Scotland (who lets say is not assassinated in 1437)--is there a scenario in which the Beauforts go through some bad luck and there is a far earlier Union of the Crowns?
 
That’s a lot of people who have to suddenly die, so it isn’t that plausible. If you want a much earlier union of the crown, I’d go with either Margaret Tudor becoming queen in the early 1510s after Henry dies suddenly or by having Margaret, maid of Norway survive and marry Edward II as was planned
 
That’s a lot of people who have to suddenly die, so it isn’t that plausible. If you want a much earlier union of the crown, I’d go with either Margaret Tudor becoming queen in the early 1510s after Henry dies suddenly or by having Margaret, maid of Norway survive and marry Edward II as was planned
Agreed. Both are much easier solutions than the Beaufort thing. And is far likelier who either John de la Pole, (heir of) Duke of Suffolk or Edmund Tudor would became Kings of England marrying Margaret Beaufort than her uncle (who in any case had ten children of his own)
 

Deleted member 204809

That’s a lot of people who have to suddenly die, so it isn’t that plausible.
I'd disagree.
- Richard of York dies in infancy
- Duke of Exeter dies young
- Henry VI dies after the Duke of Gloucester
- Margaret Beaufort is never conceived
- Edmund Beaufort dies before 1436 or is impotent
 
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I'd disagree.
- Richard of York dies in infancy
- Duke of Exeter dies young
- Henry VI dies after the Duke of Gloucester
- Margaret Beaufort is never conceived
- Edmund Beaufort dies before 1436 or is impotent
Exactly. Those are 5 people who all of a sudden has drastically different fates for no reason and with no connection. It just isn’t likely
 
Potentially easier to have Henry VI marry a Scots princess. Or Edward of Westminster/Richard III marry Mary Stewart, Albany's ship to France sinks and James III's sons die in infancy
 
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