Treasure, Blood, and Toil - A Confederate History

Title and Preamble
TREASURE, BLOOD, AND TOIL
A Confederate History
Conrad_Wise_Chapman_-_The_Flag_of_Sumter%2C_Oct._20%2C_1863.jpg

"The Flag of Sumter, Oct. 20, 1863", Conrad Wise Chapman, 1864
PREAMBLE
Hello, welcome to Treasure, Blood, and Toil! This is the first TL I've ever really written so I'm excited to finally start posting it. This timeline will primarily deal with the history of the Confederacy from late 1864 on, so most of the Civil War proper will not be focused on. Instead, I was curious to investigate the Confederacy after the war, instead of the possibilities of how and why they could have won the war. The general POD is early in the war, with Grant never gaining command of the Union Army in its entirety and it instead going to Ambrose Burnside, who conducts a much worse war in the east. This allows Lee's Army of Northern Virginia to capture Washington and put enough political pressure for a Peace Democrat to be elected in 1864. Beyond that, we will explore how I generally believe things would have turned out for the Confederacy, with plenty of butterflies and events that I'm excited to show. Along with the Chapters, which will be formatted along the line of timelines, the history of the Confederacy will be shown from the ground up in a series of Vignettes detailing the perspectives of various figures, both Confederates and foreign nationals, most of whom will be based on real life figures, if not completely identical to what they were in our timeline. With all that said, I hope you enjoy!
 
Chapter I: London, Richmond, and What Remains North
CHAPTER I: LONDON, RICHMOND, AND WHAT REMAINS NORTH
Harper%27s_weekly_%281857%29_%2814760004306%29.jpg

President Davis outside the Richmond courthouse, bringing news of the Treaty of London to enraptured crowds. 1865.
1865 - 1868
It was done in London. After four long and bloody years, they would sign the treaty in the city of London, hundreds of miles away from the lands in which American men and boys had toiled, bled, and died. From then on, a border between these two nations - and they were nations, plural, now - would be hallowed with blood and treason. President-elect Horatio Seymour had called for a ceasefire and President Lincoln, having witnessed the collapse of the Union Army, saw it as both unnecessary and excessively dangerous to continue the fight.

The War of Separation, also known as the War of Southern Independence, the War Between The States, and the War of Southern Aggression, was a war between the nascent Confederate States of America and the United States of America. It began after the declaration of independence by southerners, who feared for their rights to own people as chattel. The Confederacy, with the tacit support of both England and France, would eventually capture Washington D.C., sack Baltimore, march ever closer to Philadelphia, and end the war in a southern victory.

The topic went undiscussed in London. "Abolition died in Baltimore," said a poet, recalling the bloody way Lee took the city, shocking the Union into realizing what would happen if the war were to continue. The terms were not on bondage, as if the north could ever install abolition on the south, but rather on the territory, the miles and acres that would remain for decades. That discussion began simply, with agreements that uncontrolled territory would be released to the Union. The border states of Kentucky and Missouri, despite sending representatives to the southern cause, had been under the control of the United States throughout the war. Despite southern efforts, they would remain parts of the Union. As well, Maryland, having been Union throughout the war, was also kept in the fold, even as many slave-owners found themselves preferring the Confederate occupation.

Meanwhile, western Virginia had declared independence from their eastern counterparts, forming the Union state of Kanawha, despite Confederate claims to the area. Kanawha's existence was a burr in the boot of the Confederacy. Even as they bloodied Yankee incursion, they could not remove them from their west. Judah Benjamin, as one of the members of the peace commission, fought ardently for its return, but the Union officers were just as ardent at Kanawha's staying. It threatened to end the ceasefire, with even General Burnsides re-arming his men and preparing to defend Philadelphia. After two days solely on the "Kanawha Question", a compromise was settled: Western Virginia would be split, generally on whether it voted for or against secession, but the counties of Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Boone, and Logan were given to the Union and its newly-formed State of Kanawha. In the east, the counties of Morgan and Berkeley were granted to Maryland, due to their strong anti-secession sentiment. The remainder was returned to the Confederate State of Virginia, thereby ending the conflict in the region. Virginians, Unionist or Confederate, were uprooted as they fled to get on the right side of the border.

Other issues were little more than after-thoughts. In the far west of the Confederacy, the Arizona Territory was recognized as Confederate property, as the northern New Mexico remained in Union hands. Finally, the Indian Territory, which had mostly sided with the Confederacy, would be transferred to an "independent status", which would be administered by the Confederate Congress. That was little more than rule in another name. Historians would note the hypocrisy, in later days, but not now. No native delegation appeared in London and would not for another fifty years.

Finally, Secretaries of State Judah Benjamin and Thomas Seymour shook hands and signed the Treaty of London thereby, ending conflict between the two countries. The treaty enshrined the independence of the south - and, with it, slavery. The War of Separation was over. The Confederacy had won. From then on, June 19th would be celebrated as Peace Day in the Confederacy, as Jefferson Davis, his Cabinet, and his noble officer corps were regarded as national heroes. Several governments who had already recognized the Confederacy - among them France and the Second Mexican Empire - applauded the peace-making, though abolitionists and those who desired a better, freer world were horrified at the establishment of a state explicitly designed to protect slavery.

Once and for all, the Confederacy had been made separate from the Union. What had been the nation of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson was forever gone. This event was marked with great sorrow in the north, who had witnessed the end of something - even if it was not the death of the United States itself. As the Confederacy celebrated its birth with both fireworks and parades, the Union would stand silent, with perhaps a dalliance of thought to their southern neighbor. They turned their eyes firmly west and north and anywhere but their clearest defeat. The Confederacy, meanwhile, would remain in a constant jubilee for the next three years, a dream from which they seemed unable to wake.

There is not much to linger on in the latter days of the Davis Presidency. While defeating the Union in the War of Separation, the Confederacy found itself diplomatically isolated thanks to its dedication to its "queer institution" of slavery. Davis established a strong defense to the preservation of slavery, stating that it was both a necessary and noble practice, but this fell on deaf ears in Europe. America's keeping of the tradition for so long, so devoutly, was a problem even before the war, and Davis could not convince them otherwise. Save for the establishment of a Confederate Supreme Court, the Davis Presidency was little more than a placeholder in many ways. His contentious personality had made him few friends in Congress. Despite their reverence for their man, the Confederate Congress left power to the states to manage their own affairs. Davis, constitutionally barred from seeking re-election, would depart, leading to a hard-fought election to succeed him. His Vice President, Alexander Stephens, would gain a majority in the Electoral College, narrowly beating out friend and once-political ally Robert Toombs.

Even as the latter days of Jefferson Davis's Presidential term were idle, he was admired widely by both the people and politicians of the Confederacy. Long gone were the days of despised President Jeff Davis, weak-willed and weaker loved, as he was replaced by Founding Father Jeff Davis, the man who personally led the Confederacy through its independence. Davis would quietly leave office after his term and live a quiet life in his home in Mississippi, the Brierfield Plantation. Upon his death in 1889, his state funeral in Virginia was one of the largest to ever grace the continent, only beaten by the one given to Robert E. Lee nineteen years prior. It was attended by two Presidents, several foreign representatives, and witnessed by thousands of Confederates.

After the coffin was lowered to the grave, three slaves worked to bury the man as the rain poured down and the Confederacy watched on.
 
CHAPTER I: LONDON, RICHMOND, AND WHAT REMAINS NORTH
Harper%27s_weekly_%281857%29_%2814760004306%29.jpg

President Davis outside the Richmond courthouse, bringing news of the Treaty of London to enraptured crowds. 1865.
1865 - 1868
It was done in London. After four long and bloody years, they would sign the treaty in the city of London, hundreds of miles away from the lands in which American men and boys had toiled, bled, and died. From then on, a border between these two nations - and they were nations, plural, now - would be hallowed with blood and treason. President-elect Horatio Seymour had called for a ceasefire and President Lincoln, having witnessed the collapse of the Union Army, saw it as both unnecessary and excessively dangerous to continue the fight.

The War of Separation, also known as the War of Southern Independence, the War Between The States, and the War of Southern Aggression, was a war between the nascent Confederate States of America and the United States of America. It began after the declaration of independence by southerners, who feared for their rights to own people as chattel. The Confederacy, with the tacit support of both England and France, would eventually capture Washington D.C., sack Baltimore, march ever closer to Philadelphia, and end the war in a southern victory.

The topic went undiscussed in London. "Abolition died in Baltimore," said a poet, recalling the bloody way Lee took the city, shocking the Union into realizing what would happen if the war were to continue. The terms were not on bondage, as if the north could ever install abolition on the south, but rather on the territory, the miles and acres that would remain for decades. That discussion began simply, with agreements that uncontrolled territory would be released to the Union. The border states of Kentucky and Missouri, despite sending representatives to the southern cause, had been under the control of the United States throughout the war. Despite southern efforts, they would remain parts of the Union. As well, Maryland, having been Union throughout the war, was also kept in the fold, even as many slave-owners found themselves preferring the Confederate occupation.

Meanwhile, western Virginia had declared independence from their eastern counterparts, forming the Union state of Kanawha, despite Confederate claims to the area. Kanawha's existence was a burr in the boot of the Confederacy. Even as they bloodied Yankee incursion, they could not remove them from their west. Judah Benjamin, as one of the members of the peace commission, fought ardently for its return, but the Union officers were just as ardent at Kanawha's staying. It threatened to end the ceasefire, with even General Burnsides re-arming his men and preparing to defend Philadelphia. After two days solely on the "Kanawha Question", a compromise was settled: Western Virginia would be split, generally on whether it voted for or against secession, but the counties of Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Boone, and Logan were given to the Union and its newly-formed State of Kanawha. In the east, the counties of Morgan and Berkeley were granted to Maryland, due to their strong anti-secession sentiment. The remainder was returned to the Confederate State of Virginia, thereby ending the conflict in the region. Virginians, Unionist or Confederate, were uprooted as they fled to get on the right side of the border.

Other issues were little more than after-thoughts. In the far west of the Confederacy, the Arizona Territory was recognized as Confederate property, as the northern New Mexico remained in Union hands. Finally, the Indian Territory, which had mostly sided with the Confederacy, would be transferred to an "independent status", which would be administered by the Confederate Congress. That was little more than rule in another name. Historians would note the hypocrisy, in later days, but not now. No native delegation appeared in London and would not for another fifty years.

Finally, Secretaries of State Judah Benjamin and Thomas Seymour shook hands and signed the Treaty of London thereby, ending conflict between the two countries. The treaty enshrined the independence of the south - and, with it, slavery. The War of Separation was over. The Confederacy had won. From then on, June 19th would be celebrated as Peace Day in the Confederacy, as Jefferson Davis, his Cabinet, and his noble officer corps were regarded as national heroes. Several governments who had already recognized the Confederacy - among them France and the Second Mexican Empire - applauded the peace-making, though abolitionists and those who desired a better, freer world were horrified at the establishment of a state explicitly designed to protect slavery.

Once and for all, the Confederacy had been made separate from the Union. What had been the nation of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson was forever gone. This event was marked with great sorrow in the north, who had witnessed the end of something - even if it was not the death of the United States itself. As the Confederacy celebrated its birth with both fireworks and parades, the Union would stand silent, with perhaps a dalliance of thought to their southern neighbor. They turned their eyes firmly west and north and anywhere but their clearest defeat. The Confederacy, meanwhile, would remain in a constant jubilee for the next three years, a dream from which they seemed unable to wake.

There is not much to linger on in the latter days of the Davis Presidency. While defeating the Union in the War of Separation, the Confederacy found itself diplomatically isolated thanks to its dedication to its "queer institution" of slavery. Davis established a strong defense to the preservation of slavery, stating that it was both a necessary and noble practice, but this fell on deaf ears in Europe. America's keeping of the tradition for so long, so devoutly, was a problem even before the war, and Davis could not convince them otherwise. Save for the establishment of a Confederate Supreme Court, the Davis Presidency was little more than a placeholder in many ways. His contentious personality had made him few friends in Congress. Despite their reverence for their man, the Confederate Congress left power to the states to manage their own affairs. Davis, constitutionally barred from seeking re-election, would depart, leading to a hard-fought election to succeed him. His Vice President, Alexander Stephens, would gain a majority in the Electoral College, narrowly beating out friend and once-political ally Robert Toombs.

Even as the latter days of Jefferson Davis's Presidential term were idle, he was admired widely by both the people and politicians of the Confederacy. Long gone were the days of despised President Jeff Davis, weak-willed and weaker loved, as he was replaced by Founding Father Jeff Davis, the man who personally led the Confederacy through its independence. Davis would quietly leave office after his term and live a quiet life in his home in Mississippi, the Brierfield Plantation. Upon his death in 1889, his state funeral in Virginia was one of the largest to ever grace the continent, only beaten by the one given to Robert E. Lee nineteen years prior. It was attended by two Presidents, several foreign representatives, and witnessed by thousands of Confederates.

After the coffin was lowered to the grave, three slaves worked to bury the man as the rain poured down and the Confederacy watched on.
Interesting so far keep up the good work.
 
Wouldn't President Lee have been likelier?Davis and Stephens hated each other's guts. Wonder how Stephens would have coped?
 
Great start to then timeline, and I must admit, you certainly have a way with words and an enthralling writing style. Personally, I would like if more names for the historical figures at certain events were given, but that is just me and I could see how it could potentially distract or detract your way of writing. Will be following, and I look forward to more. (P.S. If you ever need help with anything in the history, I’m just a PM away. I really like this time period in American history, and I am always glad when someone asks me to consult on their TL!)
 
Wouldn't President Lee have been likelier?Davis and Stephens hated each other's guts. Wonder how Stephens would have coped?
There were a couple reasons I chose to have a President Stephens instead of a President Lee, though it's a good question. The dislike between Davis and Stephens began in 1862, publicly, after the war had begun to turn in the Union's favor. In my opinion, I think Stephens' opposition was always started by how the Confederacy was losing. Due to the better results of the Confederacy in this timeline, Stephens remains relatively loyal to the party and administration, being one of the many people in the south to view Davis better. Lee, meanwhile, always seemed to me to fit the model of "apolitical general" and, like Grant, would not plan a Presidential campaign on his own. However, unlike Grant, the conventions (both of whom are operating under the name Democratic Party, which you'll see soon) choose to nominate figures from the administration, instead, who seek the highest office for themselves.
A very interesting start. Can we get a map showing how Kanawha is divided? How much revanchist feeling is there towards the South in the Union? How tied is the new CSA to France and Britain?
Anyway, looking forward to where this one goes. Watched.
Sure! Here's that map of Kanawha:
MapChart_Map.png

Blue = Kanawha, Red = Virginia, Green = Maryland
It uses modern WV counties, but the borders of the two countries should be exactly the same. As you can see, Kanawha is a lot smaller than real life WV, though its population is not as small as you'd think, considering the fact that quite a few Unionist Virginians have fled to the state. One important thing it managed to win in the treaty were Logan (Logan and Mingo counties, on this) and Boone County, where there's quite a bit of coal. On your other questions, we'll explore a bit about how American revanchism will develop, but there's little right now. Presently, America's thoughts are more of a deep national shame, with blame flying all around, but there are two national consensuses forming: It was either Lincoln's radicalism that scared the south out or it was the fault of Peace Democrats stabbing the back of the American war effort. Which narrative will win remains to be seen. Now, on international ties: Neither are really tied as closely as the Confederacy would like them to be. Britain recognized the Confederacy, but their support in the war effort was rather minimal, while the French were much more supportive. France is the closer of the two, with the Confederacy helping support their puppet in Imperial Mexico, as well as offering them favorable trade deals.
Thank you all for reading and responding!
 
There were a couple reasons I chose to have a President Stephens instead of a President Lee, though it's a good question. The dislike between Davis and Stephens began in 1862, publicly, after the war had begun to turn in the Union's favor. In my opinion, I think Stephens' opposition was always started by how the Confederacy was losing. Due to the better results of the Confederacy in this timeline, Stephens remains relatively loyal to the party and administration, being one of the many people in the south to view Davis better. Lee, meanwhile, always seemed to me to fit the model of "apolitical general" and, like Grant, would not plan a Presidential campaign on his own. However, unlike Grant, the conventions (both of whom are operating under the name Democratic Party, which you'll see soon) choose to nominate figures from the administration, instead, who seek the highest office for themselves.

Sure! Here's that map of Kanawha:
View attachment 608457
Blue = Kanawha, Red = Virginia, Green = Maryland
It uses modern WV counties, but the borders of the two countries should be exactly the same. As you can see, Kanawha is a lot smaller than real life WV, though its population is not as small as you'd think, considering the fact that quite a few Unionist Virginians have fled to the state. One important thing it managed to win in the treaty were Logan (Logan and Mingo counties, on this) and Boone County, where there's quite a bit of coal. On your other questions, we'll explore a bit about how American revanchism will develop, but there's little right now. Presently, America's thoughts are more of a deep national shame, with blame flying all around, but there are two national consensuses forming: It was either Lincoln's radicalism that scared the south out or it was the fault of Peace Democrats stabbing the back of the American war effort. Which narrative will win remains to be seen. Now, on international ties: Neither are really tied as closely as the Confederacy would like them to be. Britain recognized the Confederacy, but their support in the war effort was rather minimal, while the French were much more supportive. France is the closer of the two, with the Confederacy helping support their puppet in Imperial Mexico, as well as offering them favorable trade deals.
Thank you all for reading and responding!
Thanks. Like I said: eagerly looking forward to more! I like good ACW TLs that don't descend into either TL-191-style Confederate-wankery, so this seems like a really promising start.
 
Vignette - For Union and For Liberty
FOR UNION AND FOR LIBERTY
James Monroe Deems was a cellist. He had played music as soon as he could, every day since he was five years old. From Europe to Baltimore to Richmond, he had played and taught playing. If there was anything in this life that he loved more than anything, it was music, the carefully-placed construction of tune and voice, creating beauty to the ears. With all that considered and put in place: If he heard Dixie one more goddamn time, he would shoot.

And so the musicians began another tune, compelled by the crowd surrounding them. The camp seemed to have little regard for a Unionist's wanderings around camp - that was no surprise. The war was over. Lincoln and Burnside and Seymour had seemed to make sure of that. James had taken that all in stoic reservation. He had not been a soldier at the war's start, but he certainly was one now. Brandy Station still returned in his dreams, sometimes, as if he had never left that field. Blood and fire was a familiar sight to him. He wondered how he would adjust when he returned home. Then again, it was likely he would not have to adjust to much different, considering the stories he had heard.

"General," he said, bowing his head.

"Colonel," responded Bragg, looking up from his papers. He gestured to the bottle of whiskey to his right, "Can I offer you a drink?"

"No, thank you," he said, "Excuse me if I've interrupted, but my men are preparing to depart tomorrow morning, as per the terms of our surrender. The quartermaster requires your order to release the horses into our custody."

"Yes," Bragg said, gruffly, "I will have them released this evening. You shall be able to depart by tomorrow."

"Good," he said, "I suppose then I should say my farewells, General Bragg."

"Good-bye, Colonel," he said, "Are you sure about that drink?"

Deems considered it for a moment. By law, he was still a soldier of the Union, even if he was in Confederate custody and it reflected poorly on his men to have a drink while speaking with the enemy. Then again, it wasn't as if this was much of a war, anymore. He took a seat.

"If you insist."

Bragg poured two glasses, a Kentucky bourbon. Deems wondered if he had gotten it from Kentucky in the west, but that seemed unlikely. Bragg had been defeated there and what sort of man would take a trophy from a defeat?

"You have heard the news, colonel?"

"Yes," he said, remarkably flat, "I have." A tune came into his head, something deep and… hollow. He put it aside, trying to keep it going.

"Then, this war is soon to be over," he said, "It seems we have won." James looked at him, trying to understand what sort of game he was playing. He would have bet mockery, but Bragg's expression did not change. It was that same furrowed brow and the same mouth hidden behind his rough beard. Deems looked to his glass instead, drinking down the liquor in front of him. "I always believed we would win. The northerners seemed to have finally realized that."

Deems ignored the barb.

"I wonder, General," he said, "Now what?"

"I will serve out the remainder of my commission, Colonel, as long as my country has need of me. Then I shall return to Louisiana, arrange for the plantation to continue, and retire in peace. After this war, I would think you would do much of the same, Colonel Deems."

"No," he said, "I do not think so."

"You intend to remain in the army?"

Deems looked at him for a moment.

"No."

"Then what, Colonel Deems? Business? Banking?" He said the word as if it were a curse.

"My home was in Baltimore before Lee burned it," Deems responded, "I suppose I will have to attempt the rebuilding of the city, as will many of my men. Most of them are Marylanders, General Bragg."

Silence followed. A brief, bitter silence, but a silence nonetheless. Bragg broke it.

"This war has had many casualties-"

"I am certain we all know of that, General." Deems took a sip of the whiskey, but it was not a good spirit and barely cold. He drank it down, anyway. The place he was in was not one for refusing a drink. Bragg was shocked by the interruption. Rage began to brew on his heavy brow.

"I expect more respect from a fellow soldier," he said, his accent growing a little thicker.

"Excuse my manners, General," he said, "but by this time Tuesday I will no longer be a soldier of the Union Army. Instead, I will be an American, and you will be a Dixielander, and the respect we shall offer will be the respect offered to a foreign national."

"We will both remain soldiers, Colonel," he said, "That we cannot separate from."

"That…" he said, drinking down the last of the glass, "... is what I fear. If you will excuse me, General, I have to return to my men, and then to Baltimore. Good-bye, General Bragg."

"Good-bye," Braggs said, "Colonel Deems."

Deems stood, placing his glass back on the desk, and began to walk away. Bragg's face was not anger, in the end, nor understanding. It was confused, as if it could not understand what was before him. Deems left the tent, returning to what was left of the 1st Maryland Cavalry, and could not escape the tune. It was sad, now, in the end. As if something great had been lost and Deems could almost figure out the words for what. For now, he waited for tomorrow.

Whatever tomorrow would be.
 
Very good narrative. You do a great job drawing out the tension between the two characters... now imagine this extrapolated to all over the USA and CSA. I liked the line "if he heard Dixie one more time he'd shoot"- very amusing.
I certainly don't know how you plan to run the TL but I'd like to see more little vignettes mixed in with the "textbook" bits- makes it more interesting and gives it a "human" nature. Still whatever you're doing, keep doing it because it's working!

I look forward to more.
 
There's something so... touching about this scene. A man that wonders what could have been, but now won't ever possibly be.

And looks like Reconstruction will be quite literal in the North TTL.
"My home was in Baltimore before Lee burned it," Deems responded, "I suppose I will have to attempt the rebuilding of the city, as will many of my men. Most of them are Marylanders, General Bragg."
I guess, instead of Sherman there will be Lee memes in the future.

"War is hell. After something like that, you can never really go back home... especially because Bobby Lee burned it down."
 
Chapter II: Secure the Blessings of Liberty
CHAPTER II: SECURE THE BLESSINGS OF LIBERTY
AlexStephens2.jpg

A photograph of President Alexander Stephens. 1871
1868 - 1880
Stephens was the first candidate to run under a political party, the reformed Democrats, which comprised the Pro-Administration faction, as well as a number of the more moderate Anti-Administration members. The latter sought to tie themselves closer to the victorious Davis administration. Robert Toombs, meanwhile, was nominated by the rest of the ragtag "Anti-Administration" grouping in a small convention in Atlanta. The race featured few challenges, with both sides being either elated or resigned to the idea of a Stephens victory, as Toombs did not even campaign. This race is often considered the first of the "First Party System" of the Confederacy. Often characterized as a period of unabashed dominance by the Democrats, the First Party System was a time of relative success and prosperity, with Congress more controlled by factions than parties, most taking the name "Democrat".

Meanwhile, to the north, the divisions caused by the war were evident. President Horatio Seymour fought off a challenge from the crumbling Republicans of Benjamin Wade and the nascent American Party of Francis P. Blair. To put it simply, the three were defined by their reactions to President Lincoln: the Democrats said he did too much, the Republicans said he did too little, and the Americans said he did what he should have. Seymour would win re-election, though only after a long, dirty campaign that nearly went to the House.

Alexander Stephens would be inaugurated on a warm Richmond day in 1868, pledging to defend the rights and privileges of the states, so help him God. Over his term, he would define one thing about the Confederate presidency, enshrining what Davis had done: policy was outside its purview. Instead, Stephens focused on diplomacy and warfare, overseeing the strengthening of his young nation. Congress did as it wished. He was a traditionalist, with little interest in petty partisan conflict. Stephens even placed Robert Toombs, his 1868 opponent and former Secretary of State, in his cabinet.

His greatest challenge would be clear from the onset: the north. Even though Seymour had won re-election, the same could not be said for his allies in Congress. The American Party - along with the remaining Republicans, as they united against Seymour's excesses - had won control of both houses of Congress. This alliance refused to allow a peaceable relationship with their southern opponents, recalling the burning of Baltimore. All the rest of Seymour's political goodwill would be wiped with the Panic of 1869, as the American markets crashed. The south watched the north with curiosity and paranoia as the yankees turned their attention inward. Seymour found himself under constant opposition in his Congress, vetoing several bills. Any chance he had at fostering a better relationship with the south was taken, as he was forced to turn his attention to restoring the economy.

The Confederacy, meanwhile, was economically isolated and suffered much less than its northern counterpart. As a sign of the times, delegates were even sent to Spain in an attempt to purchase Cuba or other Caribbean possessions - but these failed after a second downturn began in '71. By the end of his term, even as the economy was worse off than it began, Alexander Stephens was popular and his policies - or lack thereof - found few opponents.

Meanwhile, his opponent and current Secretary of State, Robert Toombs, prepared for the next election. Though he would be sixty-four by the time of his election, he had his eyes set on the Presidency. He wrangled party endorsements and frightened off the opposition. Despite their political rivalry, it cannot be said that Stephens and Toombs were anything but cordial, leading to few surprises when the experienced man won the President's endorsement, even as General John Bell Hood considered a run of his own. The convention, held relatively quietly in Norfolk, elected Toombs as their nominee on the first ballot, shattering any spare opposition.

But, for the first time in Confederate history, another party entered the fray. In a small hall in New Orleans, the National Party, formed of former Whigs, Anti-Administrationers, and the barest hint of abolitionists, held its first-ever convention. The Nationals hoped for better relations with the north and a transfer away, ever so slightly, from the agrarian economy which dominated the Confederacy at the time. This was a hard bargain. To many, a transition away from that was a transition away from southern values, from slavery. The National Party, in an attempt to raise support, nominated war hero and apolitical Stonewall Jackson, who accepted the nomination tepidly. Alongside him, they named Henry S. Foote, one of the National Party's smatterings of Congressmen and Senators.

The election of 1874 was the first election contested by two parties in Confederate history, though there was little doubt that the Democrats would win. In the end, Toombs would win, but it was not a complete loss for the Nationals. They would win Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama - most states in the west, even if they were ineffective anywhere east of Alabama. In the end, the 1874 election is often considered as part of the First Party System. though it would signal the eventual competitiveness of future elections.

Toombs had always been an iconoclast within the Democratic Party. Initially so opposed to Davis that he had resigned from cabinet to serve as a General, Toombs had ended his petty feud with Davis after seeing the growing success of the Confederate military. The two had almost reconciled into a working relationship by the time Davis left office. Though Toombs was defeated in the election of 1868, he had great respect for his fellow Georgian and ally Stephens, returning to his position as Secretary of State. It was no surprise when Toombs won the Democratic nomination in 1874, continuing on the President's path. Where Toombs defined himself was foreign policy. The United States was advancing and advancing quickly. By the middle of the 1870s, there was not a slave in the north and they watched their southern neighbor - and once enemy - with deep suspicion. As well, the north was industrializing, as their tariffs, unabated by southern opposition, allowed for American industry to flourish.

The word of the Toombs administration was "detente". They sought better relations with their northern neighbors, meeting with American representatives and hoping that tariffs could be lowered on the south. Initial meetings were rather positive, even as the Americans were led by a member of the American Party, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, with family in the south, sought a more peaceful solution to the "Southern Question", as some more aggressive members of his party termed it. Both leaders of American states desired a better relationship - but this was not the time of Lincoln and Davis. Since the Civil War, both countries had cracked down on the idea of the "imperial presidency", as their legislatures had reigned supreme.

The American Senate saw negotiation with their southern rivals as foolish, with ex-Republicans and Whigs providing a majority of the seats under the American Party. Their Confederate counterparts still refused to do business with the "damn Yankees". This lack of amity grew after three Yankees were arrested for facilitating the freeing of slaves. Some Americans saw a second war as the best option, led by persistent radical Benjamin Wade. It took a great deal of negotiation with his party, assisted by his Vice President, young Wade Hampton. Hampton was no fan of the U.S. but was willing to work with his own President, especially as the election drew closer and his support became more critical. Crittenden made his own deals, promising a decrease in American tariffs to Frémont, which settled the Americans, if only barely. Despite the opposition, it seemed a grand transit and commerce deal, with lasting reforms, was on the verge of being done.

They were rudely interrupted by the collapse of the Mexican Empire. Always a Confederate supporter, even amid the War of Separation, the Confederacy had repaid its southern ally with support against republican opposition to Emperor Maximilian's reign, keeping the man in power against the rebels. Since then, Maximilian I had served diligently on his throne, attempting moderate reforms while contending with radical rebels. His reign would come to an inglorious end in 1877, with his assassination by the hand of an anarchist. Almost instantly, the Mexican Empire fell into chaos. Agustín III, a fourteen-year-old boy and grandson of the first Mexican emperor, was proclaimed Emperor of Mexico.

Porfirio Díaz was a constant supporter of democracy who had lived in exile in the United States, waiting for his opportunity to strike. With the death of Maximilian and his replacement by a minor, that opportunity finally came, as Díaz returned to his home country, hailed as a hero. The chaos immediately turned into a full-blown rebellion, as both republicans and dissatisfied supporters of the regime rose in revolt. Despite the ongoing negotiations, both would go on to support their allies: the Americans would send arms and ammunition to the rebels, while the Confederates went to back their allies to the south. The so-called English-Holliday Treaty would die in the cradle, as the Confederacy and the Union looked at each other, once more, as rivals.

Within the south, voices clamored for a jingoistic response to "American aggression", urging for greycoats to support the Mexican Empire. Even as Toombs chided for less involvement, he found division from within: his own Vice President, Wade Hampton, began vocally calling for intervention in the country. This would drive a stake between the two of them, as Hampton was all but exiled from cabinet meetings and official business. Within the year, the weakened empire would be driven out of Mexico City and forced to the eastern coast. With the bulk of the country under the control of the revolution and with Díaz already proclaimed President of a República Restaurada, the royalists found their position untenable. Agustín would renounce the throne and flee the country, taking exile in Europe. Despite later plots to restore him to power, he would never again seek to restore his empire, instead living out a life as a quiet academic.

To Mexico's north, the Confederacy, having lost one of their most critical allies in the region, was sent reeling. Blame went all around. Toombs was blamed for doing too little, Hampton blamed for dividing the country, and the Americans blamed for causing the whole mess in the first place. Even as he became deeply unpopular with Toombs and his clique, Hampton found himself revered by jingoists and Amerophobes, especially since it came at such personal cost.

In the wake of such chaos, the 1880 Election became the most contentious in Confederate history, with the National Party finally spying their chance at the Presidency. While the National Party selecting Senator James Alcorn, one of the wealthiest men in the Confederacy, they could not shake the idea that the National Party was the party of abolition, northern support, and peaceniks. While most of these accusations were unfounded, it is not a lie to say that closet abolitionists flocked to the National Party in droves, seeking to "industrialize away" with slavery. The Democratic contest was a closely run-race, as Wade Hampton officially declared his candidacy. Despite their (and the President's) fervent opposition to Hampton, his opposition was unable to coalesce around a single candidate, leading to Hampton winning the nomination on the fourteenth ballot. To placate them, he nominated Richard Coke, a relatively moderate member of the party.

Alcorn put up a strong campaign, running traditional tactics, attempting to appeal to the idea of "an eternal Confederacy", looking to bring the south into the modern age and challenging the hegemony of America in the region. All in all, it was a perfectly respectable campaign and the exact campaign that fell perfectly into Wade Hampton's hands. The Confederacy was angry. Angry at defeat and angry at the north. This lingering rage allowed the birth of one of the most brutal groups to ever define Confederate politics: The Southern Legion, a pet project of one Benjamin Tillman.

The Legion was, for all intents and purposes, the military arm of the Democratic Party. It had been built up in the wake of the contested 1874 election and. though Hampton was never officially a member, would be widely associated with him. The Legion, like Hampton, had been born and raised in South Carolina. They had trained for years, preparing to defend southern values. When it came time for the Southern Legion to act, they certainly did. People were encouraged to vote for the right candidate, local figures intimidated, and the National Party was thoroughly outmatched. That was not to say that they were angels: Their own group, the Confederated Rifle Clubs, committed many of the same actions, but with less efficiency, less of a brazen attitude.

Though fellow Democrats (and Hampton, if you believe his statements) found the actions of the Legion distasteful, they were willing to stomach it, still recalling Alcorn as a quasi-Unionist Whig. So opposed were they to Alcorn, one of the most influential figures in the early National Party, that rumors began to abound that the man was a secret abolitionist. By the time the votes were counted, Wade Hampton III and Richard Coke had won. The 1880 Election was the end of the First Party System. Even as the Nationals were defeated, the fact that the Democrats so extensively used the Southern Legion is a signal of fear. With losses in the House and Senate, the Democrats had lost their dominance of Confederate politics. The Legion would begin to hibernate, but few could forget their actions. It can be said that the adoption of paramilitaries into political campaigns, more than any policy aim or negotiation, was the most defining of Hampton's actions.
 
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CHAPTER II: SECURE THE BLESSINGS OF LIBERTY

SNIP
Very very nice. So, the Southern Democrats dominate, eh? At least if I'm reading this correctly, it looks a lot like we have two KKK analogues both in violent opposition to one another. Might we see the Southern Legion engage in pro-Democrat terrorism in Western, National states and the Confederated Rifle Clubs at least attempt the same in the east? Actually, how similar are these groups to OTL's KKK? I'm basing comparisons to them on the quote about "the militant arm of the Democratic Party" but that doesn't necessarily mean the same things as OTL. For example, are the Legion and CRC as heavily anti-black as OTL's Klan?
Furthermore, it's jolly interesting to see the CSA be a 'thing' and have the Second Mexican Empire collapse. I get the feeling that in a lot of TLs, France backs the South at least in part to have a better chance at saving their Mexican puppets. Given that the Confederacy has more or less failed to deliver on that, could we see cooler Franco-Confederate relations in the future?

Just some questions-- keep doing what you're doing because it's working great! Looking forward to more!
 
Nice work.
An interesting idea skipping the refighting of the civil war and looking at what happens after that.
I wonder what effect the loss of the southern state's markets would have on Union industry. How much the CSA would import from Europe without tariffs on European industrial goods. Maybe British steam locomotives being supplied to the CSA?
How does the union economy fare without the revenue from the export of cotton, tobacco, rice, sugar, indigo and naval stores for the southern states
I wonder how many slaves escaped during the conflict to Union states.
 
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Overall, I have to agree with the others that this is a great start. What about a map of North America though? And how is Europe affected by this?
 
At least if I'm reading this correctly, it looks a lot like we have two KKK analogues both in violent opposition to one another. Might we see the Southern Legion engage in pro-Democrat terrorism in Western, National states and the Confederated Rifle Clubs at least attempt the same in the east? Actually, how similar are these groups to OTL's KKK? I'm basing comparisons to them on the quote about "the militant arm of the Democratic Party" but that doesn't necessarily mean the same things as OTL. For example, are the Legion and CRC as heavily anti-black as OTL's Klan?
There are quite a few similarities, and a couple dissimilarities, between the two groups and the Klan. All three are armed paramilitary groups and use fear in their efforts, but whereas the KKK was much more hidden, serving as an anonymized terrorist organization, members of the CFC and Legion are public individuals that operate without face-cover. They operate, primarily, within the law, with their leaders being publicly-known, while the Klan was much more secretive, even as both functioned essentially as terrorist groups. I would say the Legion and the CFC both operate a lot similarly to political clubs and paramilitaries before and after the Civil War, somewhere between the Red Shirts of South Carolina and the Wide Awakes of the Antebellum North. While there are definitely some crimes being committed by the groups, outright violence is rare, at least at the moment. The country is, presently, less partisan than it is OTL's Reconstruction, even as that is beginning to change as a direct result of the groups' actions.

On the racism of the two groups, it's somewhat complicated. Politically, slavery and white supremacy is a given - to both parties - at the moment, even as there is some abolitionist sentiment growing in some academic and private circles. To put it simply, while they are probably as racist as the Klan, that does not technically define the groups, who are more focused on political issues. In fact, it's hypothetically possible for a white-passing redbone, legally treated as white, to become a member of one of the groups, though even that is deeply unlikely.
...Furthermore, it's jolly interesting to see the CSA be a 'thing' and have the Second Mexican Empire collapse. I get the feeling that in a lot of TLs, France backs the South at least in part to have a better chance at saving their Mexican puppets. Given that the Confederacy has more or less failed to deliver on that, could we see cooler Franco-Confederate relations in the future?
Great question! Probably not, and let me tell you why: France needs friends. Napoleon III had a unique ability for diplomatically isolating himself, as we saw in real life when he went to war against Prussia after alienating all potential allies. As well, France was hit especially hard by the Panic of 1869, leading to major civil unrest within France and forcing him to turn inwards, focus on France domestically (which, ironically, is helping him diplomatically, as he is forced to withdraw troops from Rome and thereby warms relations with Italy). An abortive civil war failed, but forced France to turn away from continental politics for a brief moment. This was perfect for Bismarck, who made major inroads in the wake of it.The Franco-Prussian War was scuttled due to these butterflies, but another war is on the horizon. This is one of the reasons for the fall of Mexico, as France found itself unable to fully commit itself to supporting its puppet. All this, along with France's need for the Confederacy's cotton, makes the Empire unwilling to distance itself from the Confederacy.
I wonder what effect the loss of the southern state's markets would have on Union industry. How much the CSA would import from Europe without tariffs on European industrial goods. Maybe British steam locomotives being supplied to the CSA?
How does the union economy fare without the revenue from the export of cotton, tobacco, rice, sugar, indigo and naval stores for the southern states?
Economically, there's been a lot of change. Tariffs to protect northern businesses continue, now without southern opposition, and immigration, after dropping slightly after the war, has now begun to pick up again and in massive numbers. America recovered incredibly well after the Panic. Without the southern production, the Union's Gilded Age is... different, though the Union is presently doing quite well economically, with railroads, manufacturing, and mining growing fast - very fast. Initially, there was some trouble with the south's imports and exports. Confederate exports were relatively sparse for the first few years after the war, diplomatically and economically isolating itself by keeping with slavery, but after the Panic, the Confederacy continued to produce and began large trade with European powers, growing quite successfully, as was mentioned in the update. The Confederacy is importing a lot, of course, especially from Britain and France.
Overall, I have to agree with the others that this is a great start. What about a map of North America though? And how is Europe affected by this?
I've already talked a bit about France and we'll see a lot of what has happened in Europe in the next Chapter, so I'm going to be a little tight-lipped about that, but rest assured that there have certainly been some interesting effects in Europe. On the map, however, that I can help with. I've made two pretty basic maps, one for the U.S-Confederate border and the other the general state of the continent. In the second map, the general borders of the other nations are correct, but I couldn't get the Confederacy's and the U.S.'s border working perfectly, so refer to their map for a better look. Broadly, you'll note quite a few similarities, but there are some differences, such as Russia retaining Alaska (as the U.S. cannot purchase it).
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Credit to Hadaril's NextGen OTL Worlda Series, which this map is based off of.
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Map of North America, approximately 1880.
The lack of a Confederate Arizona Territory and the OTL Virginia border is due to software limitations.
 
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