Titanic do not hit ice berg, what is the impact of the coal fire

I can recommend Why The Titanic Sank, by Brad Rousse.

415hiKwOLWS._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


It goes into the various myths, such as the coal fire, the chasing a speed record, the issue over the radios, and all the others.
Thanks

Does it cover the "substitute" conspiracy theory? That the Titanic was rushed into service to cover for the damaged Olympic, which it was uneconomical to repair fully. With the latter being deliberately sunk while pretending to be the Titanic.

Weird
 
Does it cover the "substitute" conspiracy theory? That the Titanic was rushed into service to cover for the damaged Olympic, which it was uneconomical to repair fully. With the latter being deliberately sunk while pretending to be the Titanic.

Yes. The theory is, to put it mildly, not entirely credible. The book looks into the theory.
 
Thanks

Does it cover the "substitute" conspiracy theory? That the Titanic was rushed into service to cover for the damaged Olympic, which it was uneconomical to repair fully. With the latter being deliberately sunk while pretending to be the Titanic.

Weird
Hey Finbarr,

I mention it in passing - as @David Flin said, it's nonsense. For the ultimate analysis and debunk of the switch theory, check out Which Ship Sank? by Bruce Beveridge and Steve Hall.

-Brad "Resurgam" Rousse
 
Back in the day bunker fires were an ordinary occurrence on the coal fired ships. The problem is when you are dealing with partially filled bunkers and the fact you might get a coal dust explosion, coal dust and grain dust explosions were a common occurrence back then, from an adjacent bunker on fire. You might go so far as to flood a partially or almost empty bunker to prevent this.

Coal dust explosions were also far more deadly in mines than anywhere else, largely because of the unique conditions of a coal mine.

Coal mining was a dangerous business- before electric lighting in mines was introduced in the 1880s and only became commonplace in the 1910s (in Britain), the only means of lighting the mine were candles, and flame safety lamps. The best of these only gave off 1/3 to 1/2 the light of a candle (they rely on wire gauze which flames cannot pass through; if the gauze is too large, as in the Scotch Davy types, gas buildup in the lamp can have enough explosive force to push flames out through the gauze), so there was always the temptation to use open/"naked" lights. The earliest Davy pattern lamps were only 1/15th to 1/30th as bright as a candle.

Coal mines also give off "damps"; gases, which are variously flammable and toxic. They include:

-Firedamp: Methane. Most explosive between 5% and 15% of the atmospheric mix.

- Stinkdamp: Hydrogen sulfide. Toxic, flammable and easy to detect

-Whitedamp: Carbon monoxide. Toxic and flammable.

-Blackdamp: An unbreathable, oxygen-free mixture of water vapour, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Underground coal seam fires (suck as those caused by lightning striking an outcrop) give off blackdamp if combustion is complete, whitedamp if incomplete. Coal also oxidizes, which can cause blackdamp.

-Afterdamp: A mix of blackdamp and whitedamp after a fire or explosion.

The gases were usually the cause of fires. Naked lights, or miners firing gunpowder charges before electric coal cutters were introduced, without the supervision of an overman or deputy were usually the cause. The confined nature of a mine also directs explosive force through the tunnels.

It was long theorized that coal dust alone could not cause an explosion, but could potentiate a firedamp explosion. The causes were also difficult to ascertain because all the witnesses were usually dead.

It wasn't known until well into the 20th century that stone dusting could be used to inert coal dust; before then, the only way to combat the problem was dusting, sweeping and watering, which were time consuming and expensive.

Most deaths weren't caused by the explosion itself- they were caused by asphyxiation from the afterdamp, or falls of rock landing on the miners or blocking ventilation from the shaft or wrecking air courses.
 
Last edited:
Without the *Titanic* disaster, and the resulting demand for lifeboats for all, there might never have been an *Eastland* disaster (which killed more passengers than the *Titanic*:

"Court decisions blamed improperly weighted ballast tanks for the disaster. But transportation historian George W. Hilton argued in a 1995 book that the international reaction to the sinking of the Titanic three years earlier ultimately doomed the Eastland, which had almost capsized in 1904 with 2,370 people aboard.

"Because there were lifeboats and rafts for less than half the Titanic's licensed passenger capacity, an international furor arose. Sen. Robert M. La Follette of Wisconsin introduced a bill that required ships to have enough lifeboats for 75 percent of their passengers.

"On July 2, 1915, the owners of the Eastland added three lifeboats and six rafts, weighing 14 to 15 tons, to its top deck. A boat that had already exhibited stability problems became top-heavy. Three weeks later, the next time it was loaded to capacity, the Eastland capsized."

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...chicagodays-eastlanddisaster-story-story.html


"During 1915, the new federal Seamen's Act had been passed because of the RMS Titanic disaster three years earlier. The law required retrofitting of a complete set of lifeboats on Eastland, as on many other passenger vessels.[7] This additional weight may have made Eastland more dangerous as it potentially worsened the already severe problem of being top-heavy." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Eastland

Some people attack the "lifeboat theory" by noting that the Eastland had almost capsized twice before, and was bound to eventually capsize: "The ship had a ballast system that was supposed to stabilize it to counteract unwanted rolling. It worked most of the time, but when it didn't work, it was abysmal. The Eastland was going to capsize at some point—there's no question." https://www.chicagoreader.com/Blead...e-of-the-great-injustices-of-the-20th-century This may be true. But it doesn't eliminate the possibility that on July 24, 1915, the extra weight of the lifeboats made the difference between an unstable ship that came close to capsizing and an actual, disastrous capsizing.
 
I don't really understand this sentence but if im reading it right
Theres no rush to get Titanic to New York to put out the fire, it was already out . . .
Are you talking about the idea that people wanted the Titanic to break the transatlantic record? Because that's a myth. It wasn't fast enough to set a new record and everyone knew it. . .
I’m not talking about a record.

Just a successful voyage in which the ship comes in slightly ahead of time.

——————————

* Just human nature, people want to do a good job. And when a person gets older and more mature, often wants members of his or her team to also receive credit for a job well done.
 
Last edited:
Top