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Mr A

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The Stars Fly High
Time is never-ending, our universe is but one of many. Outside the restraints of our known Galaxy is multiple realities connected together in one great blanket of existence. Across this great blanket of reality lays infinite possibilities. Every question that could ever be posed creating a new universe, weaving itself into the fabric of reality. One Question connects all reality’s, one question never-ending rolling from universe to another; What If?
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What If America pushed forward and stuck by its founding ideas?​
 
Chapter One: The Meeting of Two Mind’s

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Chapter One: The Meeting of Two Mind’s
March 1st, 1774

Johnathan Hawthorne sat tapping his foot nervously on the floor. He looked around at the British soldiers that had been stationed in his local tavern and sighed. Hawthorne's great great grandfather, an Irish immigrant had arrived in the new world in 1685. From there they had grown into a rather powerfully family, his father serving as the governed of Massachusetts. Hawthorne was also set on the path to politics, he had studied at the top colleges here in the thirteen colonies yet he found himself annoyed.

The British, the people his family had fled from, had come down on the colonies. Movements happened here and there but nothing had spurred the colonies to move. They sat down and let the British subjugate them, there were calls for a voice for the people but it was not fast enough. The door to the tavern slipped open and an average looking gentlemen walked in, he got no looks from the patrons who continued about their business. The figure was Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton was born out of wedlock in Charlestown, Nevis. He was orphaned as a child and taken in by a prosperous merchant. When he reached his teens, he was sent to New York to pursue his education. It was here they came across each other’s papers on the thoughts of the people and a new political way for America and had become close friends.

They both agreed that while Congress was doing good, their endless debating was getting them nowhere. The time for action was now or never. They had plotted together and had gathered a force of three hundred able-bodied men, much more than congress would ever dream of allowing.

“Are the men ready?” Hawthorne asked, Hamilton, nodded. What they planned was open treason against the empire and they knew they had no chance of success. However, they knew that they planned to strike a bold move that could inspire the people to rise up against their oppresses. The British had already stamped out their congress, there was nobody now to unite the people. They hoped tomorrow that would change.

“Then Tomorrow. At Dawn, we Strike” Hawthorne added. The pair smiled at each other. If they were right, they would ignite a moment that could change their colonies forever however if they were wrong, they would die and the thirteen colonies would be forever shackled to the British Empire forever. All they had now was hope, hope for a free tomorrow.

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The Thirteen Colonies​
 
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Chapter Two: The Capture of Gale's Head Fort

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Chapter Two: The Capture of Gale's Head Fort
March 2nd, 1774


The British soldier kicked back on his wooden stool and whistled to himself. Come to the new world, serve your king, see great bounty; what a load of lies. But still, here he was, defending the fort. He longed for his bed, to sleep. His duty manning the guard post the entrance lasted from three am till eight am, he would then be believed for food and sleep. Dawn was breaking on the misty horizon and frost had settled neatly on the ground; he rubbed his arms and hands together to try to keep warm in the freezing temperatures of the early morning.

He yawned as he sat up straight in his seat. There was a light in the distance growing more prominent. He grabbed his rifle and exited the hut as the lights grew closer. He stood waiting as two horses stopped in front of him, the light illuminated their blank face. He knew who they were, key voices of the free America movement; alexander Hamilton and Johnathan Hawthorne.

“For What its worth, we do not wish pain upon your people but your King’s actions have left us no choice” Hamilton declared, the soldier was about to say something but his voice was cut short. A silver knife slid across his throat his blood painting the ground below. The attacker placed his hand over the soldier’s mouth and brought him to the ground, he withered on the floor and died slowly. Hamilton turned and nodded to Hawthorne who raised his lamp and flashed it twice.

Across the land over thirty men attacked, silently securing the guard posts, sealing the garrison inside. Gale's Head Fort was not considered an important fort by the British so the 300 man army of rebel farmers was more than a match for the army here. As Dawn broke, the garrison quirkily realized they were trapped. As the clock struck midday on March the second seventeen seventy-four, the first British fort had fallen into rebel hands.

“This will be the spark that ignites the revolution,” Alexander said. Hawthorne nodded as he looked out over the land. The time had arrived, they just now had to hope congress would move into action once more or it would all be for nothing.
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Gale head fort ( now renamed fort sewall)
……….
George Washington sat drinking his cold milk and munching on his toast. His wife Martha sat across from him. Washington received his initial military training and command with the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War. He was later elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses. Washington turned to look at the nergo boy walk into the room. He was quicker than usual; he had a spring in his step. Washington was not sure about enslaving the niggers but it was a necessity for his plantation to thrive; if there was any other would he would seek it.

The slave said nothing to him, as would be expected. He placed the newspaper onto the table then left with haste. Washington placed his glasses on his head as he gestured for another slave to clean the table. He picked up the paper and read the headline:

Rebel Traitors captured Gale’s head fort. Heroic General William Howe to aid the reclaiming of the fort.

Washington looked aghast at the paper. The people had finally moved against the British an action that would see them suffer and likely be punished by death. Washington did not want to read the rest of the paper, he took of his glasses and threw the paper onto the table. The slave boy returns and handed a letter to Washington. Washington opened it and read it, his eyes going wide. They were really doing this then. He stood up and turned to his slave.

“Get Artakus to prepare my carriage and ready my riding outfit” Washington ordered. His wife looked up puzzled at him.

“Congress has called upon me again. I must go. It’s the will of the people” Washington explained, Martha nodded. Congress though disbanded by the British were now to meet once more to discuss the most recent events. He had been asked to return as a delegate from Virginia, it was not something he wanted to do but it was the will of the people and he would ignore it. He would set out for Philadelphian forthwith. Congress would have to act now, it’s what the people wanted.
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Martha and George Washinton​
 
Chapter Three: Congress Convenes

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Chapter Three: Congress Convenes
March 8th, 1774
Pennsylvania State House is where congress rushed to gather, it took two days after the capture of the fort for congress to gather as one body once more. They sat pact tightly into a room, an air of tension hung over them all. Debates had lasted from the 5th till the 8th. Speeches from both sides of the coin were spoken with fire and passion. The questions at hand were three rather large overbearing questions; should America become free, should America field an army and if so, who should lead it.

As they sat debating in their tightly compact room. The British had moved with swift haste. William Howe had moved in under the cover of darkness and secured the fort from the rebels. Hamilton and Hawthorne had managed to escape by sea taking equipment and fleeing. Forty men had gone with them, 260 remained to be slaughtered by the British who bombarded the fort with cannon fire. Now even more dire news William Howe had, on the permission of the king, declared the northern states under complete martial law and his army now marched towards them with quick haste in order to quell the rebellion.

The British actions had swayed the people of the colonies towards the American cause and already men enlisted to town militias to try to defend against then onslaught. On the night of the 8th March, the British forces entered New York and claimed it, settling there waiting for further orders from the king, it made congress more skittish than ever having the enemy forces so close nearby. The air was both thick and heavy, the cold chill that entered the room was not enough to calm their fears.

John Hancock had been elected president of congress above the rest, despite favor of john Adams taking the position. Before the American Revolution, Hancock was one of the wealthiest men in the Thirteen Colonies, having inherited a profitable mercantile business from his uncle. He began his political career in Boston as a protégé of Samuel Adams, an influential local politician. Originally, they had planned to open votes but that was defeated by one vote to allow for private voting, to not allow others to pressure a voter. John Hancock rose from his seat causing the room to go silent.

“57 Votes for Independence and an army and three votes against. independence will be drafted up shortly by a committee. Now John Adams, you and the delegates have a man who can lead our new army” John Hancock said, there was a sigh of relief in the room as John Hancock sat down and John Adams rose. A lawyer and political activist prior to the revolution, Adams was devoted to the right to counsel and presumption of innocence. He defied anti-British sentiment and successfully defended British soldiers against murder charges arising from the Boston Massacre. Adams was a Massachusetts delegate to the Continental Congress.

“We here in the congress see no finer man than George Washington to lead our army. There is no man in our land that could do the job better. This Appointment will have a great Effect, in cementing and securing the Union of these Colonies” John Adams said, congress cheered in its approval. Washington looked on shocked by the sudden gazes that laid upon him.

“George Washington Of Virginia shall become Commander in chief of the new army. Is there anything you would like to say” Hancock asked as Washington rose to his feet and cleared his throat

“Mr. President, I am truly sensible of the high Honour you place in me with this appointment, yet I feel great distress, that my abilities and military experience may not be equal to the extensive and important trust you have placed in me. However, as the Congress desire it, I will take upon the momentous duty, and exert every power I possess in their service, and for support of the glorious cause. I beg they will accept my most cordial thanks for this distinguished position. "But if some unlucky event should happen that is unfavorable to my reputation, I do beg it may be remembered, by every Gentleman in the room, that I, this day, declare with the utmost sincerity, I do not think myself equal to the Command I am honored with” Washington spoke, Adam’s and Hancock looked around the delegates in the room, there was a fire in their eyes.

It would be a long road to independence and victory. There was the need for an official document declaring independence and a draft would have to be put in place in order to bolster their army. Everyone in that room had also committed treason and would now live in on freedom or die from a noose or bullet. On this day of March 8th, 1774, America had begun its first infant steps towards freedom.
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Pennsylvania State House. Now Named Independence Hall​
 
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Chapter Four: The King’s Response

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Chapter Four: The King’s Response
March 12th, 1774

Pitter-patter, pitter-patter. The Miserable London weather hounded upon the windows of the palace. It was another bleak day and saint James’s palace was not as modern or suitable as his beautiful Buckingham Palace. this place, constructed in the Tudor times, was cramped and cold. It was not good for a man of his standing but it was, for now, where official business took place. The crown was a heavy burden he weighed upon his head but it was a duty he had to hold. He was sworn to protect the people and advance the interests of the British empire.

He tapped his foot on this throne, fires burned in the distance but their protection against the bitterly cold spring chill was something he couldn't feel. He was cold, tired, and hungry though the advisors continued to drone on about the state of things he did not care about. It was a constant droning he managed to block out in his mind, a lot of the business they spoke to him now would be handled by parliament, yet they still came to tell him.

“Stop, stop there. Repeat what you just said” George III demanded. His advisor looked confused but he had almost certainly heard a word that had piqued his interest. Nothing bothered him but one thing did.

“The Congress of The American People would like to have meetings with you on their treatment. If you decline my grace. They say they will have no choice but to serve all contact between the new states and the mother country” The Advisor said. George stood up and walked with passion towards the window, his advisor following him. George stood walking the pitter-patter of the rain, studying every droplet of rain that cascaded against the window.

“Our Empire will not sit down and talk with a small band of rebels. They are committing treason against me, their good graceful king. Order parliament to mobilize for war, if they want freedom then they will see what freedom is. They will all die as traitors to the state” George barked; his advisor noted his words down quickly. These upstarts would be punished and would be a lesson to all; do not mess with the British empire.
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King George III
.....
Thomas Jefferson tightened up his shoe, behind him laid Elizabeth Larson. Elizabeth Larson was an enslaved woman of mixed race owned by Jefferson. She had also replaced his dead wife as his lover though it was a secret nobody could ever know. Martha Jefferson had died in 1773. Jefferson was conflicted deeply about slavery; he did not enjoy the practice but he knew it was necessary for a plantation to run; if there was any other way, he would have sought it. The door to his room burst open and Jefferson turned startled.
Jefferson rolled his eyes as Johnathan Hawthorne entered. Jefferson admired but also disliked Hawthorne. He had a bright mind, a smart one at that more forward-thinking than many of the people Jefferson knew. But the association with the more, bloodthirsty Alexander Hamilton cast doubts in Jefferson’s mind about Hawthorne. Still, Hawthorne was a smart young man, only at the age of 27.
“Hawthorne dear sir. Did you forget how to knock, did your little raid knock some of your brains lose” Jefferson asked, Hawthorne’s eyes darted from the naked mixed-race slave in the bed to Jefferson, Hawthorne said nothing. He strode forward and handed the letter to Jefferson.
“You Ignored the first three letters. So, they sent me personally to deliver this one and to ask you to come with me to congress. You have been chosen as a member of a committee to write the declaration of independence from the British” Hawthorne added, Jefferson read over the letter and what Hawthorne said was all true. He did not want to leave his home here, he felt at peace but he had been summoned and would not put aside a chance to be at the forefront of a new nation being born.

“I will come. Go downstairs and tell my head slave to prepare for my departure. I will be about ten minutes” Jefferson said, Hawthorne nodded and exited the room. Jefferson stood up and turned to look at his slave. She would come with him but they would have to be more careful. His hand reached for his pants, he had ten minutes better make the most of that time.




 

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Chapter Five: A Declaration of Independence

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Chapter Five: A Declaration of Independence
2nd April 1774

The Capture of Gale's Head Fort was now a month old in the memory of the people. Yet still, no war that was promised came. The army Washington had gone down in size inside and life continued as normal. William Howe’s forces had been bolstered to three thousand men and that is how it remained, living in New York as normal life continued. Congress suspected the king was playing a game with them and that it was now their turn to make the next move.

They had been making that move for over a month now, it was slow progress and congress told them their time was nearly over. John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Roger Sherman, Robert Livingston, and Johnathan Hawthorne were crafting it. Yet they had come across a snag that had caused problems and the delaying of the declaration. The sun beat down upon the Pennsylvania State House on a particularly sweltering spring day, streaming through the windows and roasting the men inside the building to the point of boiling. They loosened their stuffy collars and shifted their uncomfortable wigs, trying anything to escape the heat.

“We are not removing that passage. And that is the final word on that matter” Jefferson bellowed as he slammed his fists into the table.

"Mister Jefferson, you benefit from slavery. How could you support this?" asked Jonathan, who was presiding over the Committee of the Whole. Jefferson turned to his friend, and grinned through his teeth; he did hate him so much sometimes.

“I do yes. But that does not make it any less evil. Slavery is wrong and we must find a way to stop it without overstepping." Jefferson explained, he would not let this go, not one bit.

"I ask simply for it to remain," pleaded Jefferson. Jefferson watched as every man consented to leave in the passage. The end to the slave trade could for sure be the beginning of the end for slavery altogether.

“Then it is done. The deceleration is complete” John Adams chimed in to calm tensions. The group looked at each other and smiled. They had done it, which meant that the second of April was officially Independence Day. Though they knew this meant a lot, it was not the end but just the dawning of a war. With this act, the Empire would now surely act. The war they long dreaded was upon them.
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The signing of the United States Declaration of Independence
..............
William Howe walked through the encampment just outside New York. His troops buzzed about, drilling and checking weapons. He hated being in this country it was either too cold or to warm. He longed to be at home though at least here he could do some good for his king. His troops itched for a battle with these so-called American’s so they could put them in their place.

All around the camp, there was a sudden buzz. Something had happened, something Howe was not aware of. Not knowing things irritated him to no end. He turned to a troop and pointed his finger before telling him to stop. The soldier froze dead in his tracks, fearing he had done something wrong.

“Why is this camp so lively. Have you been drinking” Howe demanded, the solider gulped?

“It’s the American’s sir. They have declared their independence from the king. It's spreading like wildfire sir” the soldier explained. Howe’s face lit up. This was what he needed, the king had degreed they could only move if they declared open treason, and now, they had. It was finally time to teach these pesky Americans’ a lesson. It would not take long to restore order to the colonies, that was something Howe was certain of.

The American War For Independence Had Begun
 
Chapter Six: The Battle of Trenton

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Chapter Six: The Battle of Trenton
4th April 1774

The Delaware River shone brightly as the morning sun rose and cast its gaze across the waves. Trenton was normally a town full of activity, its people buzzing around trying to catch travelers on their way from Philadelphia to New York. Trenton dated back at least to June 3, 1719, when mention was made of a constable being appointed for Trenton while the area was still part of Hunterdon County. Boundaries were recorded for Trenton Township as of March 2, 1720. A courthouse and jail were constructed in Trenton around 1720, and the Freeholders of Hunterdon County met annually in Trenton.

Trenton today was emptier than normal, it was almost ghost-like. Houses left empty, shops left closed and the taverns that were normally packed with energy were all empty. Instead, Trenton was now full of a different kind of energy. The First Corps of the Continental Army of about two thousand men stretched out across the embankment. The news had broken two days ago, Washington had moved the Continental Army in to protect the city but after news of British atrocities across New York, the people had fled in doves.

Washington sat upon his horse watching the events that happened below. They were all wary of what was about to take place. An Erie silence that had hung over the town for two days was suddenly shattered, gunfire erupted and American’s began to fall. From across the plain’s the British new marched, their redcoats glimmering in the morning sun. Now was the time for them to take a stand.

“Fire” Washington barked. The American cannons that had been silent now began to sing their song, bombarding the British troops. Washington watched as a cannonball exploded near a set of troops, tearing them apart leaving only parts of their bodies behind. It was not a site he liked to see. Many British forces began but so too did the American’s, they were vastly outmatched. Washington’s horse reeled as a British cannonball exploded nearby. There were calls to retreat, though Washington held steadfastly.

They were losing that was true, the British drew ever closer but they were not going out without a fight. If they wanted to take the city then they would bleed for it first. Washington watched as the British drew closer, a second cannonball landed near his horse and it reeled again. His men continued to fight and fall.

“Retreat men, Retreat” Washington ordered, the British were now nearing the bridge and the canons one by one began to fall silent. His army moved swiftly, fleeing south. Washington stayed behind, removing his pistoles he shot dead two soldiers that neared him and kicked another in the face. At the last moment, when he believed enough of his troops had retreated and only then did Washington also retreat. Though the battle was a loss for the American’s, they had dealt a blow to the morale of the British forces.

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The First Battle Of Trenton: The first fight in the war for independence.
.............................
John Adams rubbed the sweat from his brow. Infernal southern heat made life nearly impossible. Jefferson sat across from Adams not having the same problem. Jefferson almost seemed smug about it. Richmond was the current home of congress and though it was not a place many of them wanted to be, it was the place they had unfortunately found themselves. Philadelphia had come under threat after they lost the battle of Trenton so congress had chosen to flee further south and how now settled into Richmond.

Adams had better accommodations than most during their time in the south. Jefferson wanted a mind to play off, he felt needlessly bored while they waited for Congress to convene again. Adams had found himself and his family housed in Monticello. Monticello was the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson, who began designing Monticello after inheriting land from his father at age 26. Located just outside Charlottesville, Virginia. Adams rather enjoyed it in a grand manner though he was rather uneasy about all the slaves that rushed around.

“We need a professional army. The battle of Trenton has proved we are ineffective against their forces” Adam’s declared as he threw the book onto the table. Jefferson looked up at his guest with a puzzled look at the sudden outburst.

“A professional army is not all we need. We need allies too” Jefferson responded. Adams turned now with more energy. Jefferson had certainly awoken something in his friend though that he wasn’t sure.

“Then we must get Congress to agree. On both points, together with our connections. We could do it” Adams suggested. Jefferson now turned with his own interest, he put down the pipe he was smoking and truly focused on what Adam was saying. Both he and Adams were popular people in congress, a few words here and there could not hurt the American course.

“I will see what I can do” Jefferson responded. Adams smiled and returned to his book. Jefferson looked down at his pipe and shook his head. He was not sure what he was getting himself into now, he just hoped it was the right move and not a wrong one.
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Founding Father John Adams​
 
Chapter Seven: The Defence of Philadelphia

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Chapter Seven: The Defence of Philadelphia
5th April 1774

The fire burnt brightly in the middle of the house. The house was crammed with injured soldiers. Three men stood looking at the rifles on the table. Aaron burr, Alexander Hamilton and Johthan Hawthorne. Trenton had fallen just a day earlier and now the British army advanced towards Philadelphia. An entire city with the injured and sick, many normal soldiers had stayed behind as well under the command of Henry Knox. The main bulk of the force had retreated to Wilmington where Washington ordered them not to move one step back.

“We can’t just sit here. We have to fight” Hamilton declared as he paced the room. Burr did not like Hamilton he thought him loudmouthed and arrogant, he also hated his background. The fact that burr was here with the two people who raided Gail head’s thought did not make him most pleased. He was a gentleman of great honor who should be fighting beside Washington, not with these two people.

“And what are you suggesting we do against an army that size” Burr inquired. Hamilton stopped and looked at him. Hamilton had no liken for this pompous rich fool. He did no actions that were his own and only clung onto others to allow himself to climb to the top. They had never been fond of each other though they rarely interacted but instead learned of each other through newspapers and word of mouth.

“Men in every building, in every window. Hide them in the bushes, in the tree line, around every corner, in the roof spaces. Anywhere you can put a man. Line up the cannons behind the city and have them open fire when they see the British coming” Hamilton explained. Burr and Hawthorne sat up in the chairs. Hawthorne had no reason not to agree but Burr did. What Hamilton was suggesting was not a conventional way of war, it did not line up with the rules of warfare that had been established for a long but maybe that’s how they could win; by changing the game played.

“Beter to die fighting than sitting in this hell hole” burr admitted. Hamilton looked on in shock at burr’s agreement with his plan but said nothing. Hamilton picked up a gun and smiled. They would fight till the day to protect the town, fighting a new way of warfare the British could never understand. Deep down Hamilton hoped it would elevate his position and so too did burr; maybe the foes were more like each than they ever liked to admit.
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Henry Knox and Aaron Burr

.....................
Washington stood in his tent looking over the map of the local area when the news broke to him in the late hours of the night. The lamp’s cast an orange warm overglow over the map, it matched the feeling they felt when the news broke. The men left under the command of Henry Knox had defended Philadelphia and caused the British to retreat back to Trenton. Knox had worked with three names that stood out to Washington to apply new tactics to fight the British.

Burr, Hamilton, and Hawthorne. Their names kept cropping up to him for different reasons but the actions of all three had affected their cause in ways that had aided them. Washington looked down at the map. He thought long and hard as the minutes ticked by. They had to securer the peninsula and allow a war of attrition to kick in. They would have to retake Trenton.

Washington knew that the British would dig in now that they had been pushed back at Philadelphia. They would wait in Trenton for them to attack. Trenton was a perfect place for them to stage attacks on American encampments, they would not let go of it without a fight. They would get their fight, but Washington had a new idea. Strike by night, strike hard; a new way of warfare for the new American nation.
 
Chapter Eight: The Second Battle of Trenton

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Chapter Eight: The Second Battle of Trenton
7th April 1774
Hamilton crouched in the bush. The gun felt heavy in his hand. Three divisions of American troops scattered throughout the forest led by Burr, Hamilton, and Hawthorne. Nearby the combined armies of Washington and Knox waited. The three of them felt the pressure of the attack they were about to engage in. The British did not expect night attacks, so they had drunk and got merry and now fell into a drunken sleep.

Hamilton crept closer; the smell of smoke began wafting through the air. It was just after midnight and the fire’s in their encampment were dying out. This could be the victory that pushed all of them further into the limelight. It was something they all wanted for different reasons. Hamilton stopped. They were mere inches away from the camp now. He removed a match and a piece of paper from his pocket, carefully he scrunched it up in his hand then struck up the match.

He watched the flame dance for a moment before he lit the paper. Around him his soldiers did the same, all across the forest there was suddenly light. But the British had no time to react. One bit of paper would not be enough to do what they hoped for but Hamilton hoped more the one would do it. He closed his eyes, stood up, and threw the flaming ball of paper into the camp. It connected to a tent and ignited it, inside the screams of the British could be hurt as they were set alight.

The confusion was deafening, the British scrambling about as some of the flaming paper balls made contact, setting more tents alight. Without warning the American canon’s opened fire, one of the balls hit the British powder keg, an enormous fireball ruptured tearing through the camp. Hamilton and his troops attacked, cutting down the British now as they began to flee. The other’s advanced too from the other angels, driving the British back over the river and into New York. They had done it, they had won the battle.
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The Second Battle Of Trenton
.......
By early morning the smoldering remains of the camp had died out. Hamilton stood off to the side watching the troops begun to clean up and establish a new base for the Americans. He smiled; the war would go on now a fair battle between two sides. Congress would return back to Philadelphia as a message to the people that they were not scared. Deep down Hamilton knew that this was not the end of the war but just the start.

“Alexander Hamilton,” a voice said. Hamilton turned and stood to attention. Before him stood General George Washington. It was a great honor to you if the man spoke to you, he held the highest position in America as of this moment.

“You did well today. I would like to offer you the position of my aid. Help me and the army come up with new strategizes and take over my correspondence with congress” Washington said. Hamilton smiled; it was the praise he wanted. It wasn’t exactly the job he wanted, he would prefer to fight but this was a position, a starting ring the in the ladder to the top.

“I will take the job sir” Hamilton responded. He would prove to everyone he was more than just an orphan immigrant. The war still had a long way to go but at least now he had an official position in that war. Now all he had to do was continue the success they had found already or it would be his head on the chopping block.
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General George Washinton and Alexander hamilton.​
 
Chapter Nine: Friend or More

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Chapter Nine: Friend or More
7th July 1774

Three months had passed. Three months of stalemate. There were skirmishes here and there across the states of Pennsylvania and New York. Life continued on dedicated to the war effort. Congress had endlessly debated establishing a proper army while the actual army stagnated even worse, they could not agree on whether to send diplomatic envoy’s out to other countries; their struggle against the British was one they fought alone.

John Laurens sat in a chair; he had been fighting in the north for a short while now. He was originally placed in the south but combat down there was almost non-existent. On behalf of his family and colony, he had been transferred up north. It's here where he flourished and caught the eyes of both Washington and Hamilton. Though with Washington, it was purely a military friendship but with Hamilton, it was much more.

They understood each other and had become close friends. Closer than anyone, luckily for him it was normal for men at war to be this close it meant everyone ignored how actually close they were and nobody questioned Laurens’s true feelings; he had a wife but he never felt anything there. The pair denied it to each other but there was a spark there. Laurens had prayed to god his sinful urges would go away but they just wouldn't make him question his loyalty to the church.

“How could they turn me down. Do they not know how good it could be? How America’s image would shine” Hamilton shouted as he walked around the room, his rage showing. Laurens was one of the few who had seen the rage within Hamilton. He just wanted to do the best for America but always found himself caged in by his lower standing.

Laurens rose from his seat and walked over to his friend. He placed his hand on his shoulder, stopping his friend from pacing the room. The coldness the war brought was replaced by warmth as for a few seconds the pair locked eyes with each other.

“I have an idea. I could head south again. Join forces with Jefferson, raise the first black battalion. Prove to the people there more than just slaves” Laurens said, Hamilton, smiled and took his friend’s hand. Both Hamilton and Laurens hated slavery and they suspected Jefferson wasn’t keen on it either. If they could get him on the side, they would have a great political ally.

“That’s a great idea” Hamilton responded. The pair stopped, they looked at each other again. Transfixed by each other’s eyes. Hamilton’s grasp on Hamilton's hand tightened. The pair shared the quickest warmest kiss before Laurens pulled away. He corrected his outfit, nodded at Hamilton then left the room. Hamilton turned, grabbed a glass from the desk, and threw it at the wall. This was wrong and he knew but he just couldn't deny the feelings he felt. He needed a wife and he needed one now.

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John Laurens

………………………
Jefferson stood in his room looking out at the slaves that toiled hard in the gardens, nearby a slave master stood with a whip ready to crack down hard. Inside he felt a great sadness, that man could enslave another. There were claims they were nothing but mindless savages but Jefferson knew that could not be true. Jefferson needed them but did not want them.

Elizabeth pulled herself from the bed, wrapping the sheets around herself she joined Jefferson at the window. Jefferson placed his arm around her shoulder and pulled her closer. If anyone ever found out what they did in this room he would be forever ruined if not killed. Still, he refused to end it, he could never bring himself to do that. She was the most beautiful woman he ever met, yes, her skin was darker but her lips luscious and her eyes shone like the clearest lake.

“You could end this. You know there is a path you could take. these people do not need to be enslaved” Elizabeth pointed out. Jefferson wanted to ignore her words, to pretend like she was not right but he couldn't. There had to be something he could do and he had an idea of what. Hamilton, one of the largest anti-slavery voices in the north and if not in America if they could work together, meld their political ideals they could become a force that could tear down this terrible institution. But then again if slavery was gone; who would look after his crops?
 
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Chapter Ten: A Winter’s Ball

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Chapter Ten: A Winter’s Ball
5th December 1774

The months passed by and the war raged on. The spring fell into summer, then summer into fall and fall into winter. The winter brought new challenges for the young nation to face. The bitter cold had settled in and had started to bombard the troops with hypothermia and starvation. Punishments for crime increased as people began to flee the army or steal food. The army faced its darkest days as the ever-looming threat of the British loomed. They had settled into New York, free from the worries that faced the Americans.

Still as winter set in, the American’s had a course to celebrate. Eight months of independence from the mother country. It was something no other country had done before, it proved to those trapped in bondage by a European country that you could rise up and take the freedom you long deserved. To celebrate their eight-month existence, Philip Schuyler had put on a grand winter ball.

The winter’s ball had also become known as the Ball of America. Normally these affairs would be localized to close friends but not now. The ball was magnificent with many guests. There were the guests that were expected Alexander Hamilton, Johnathan Hawthorne, Aaron Buur, John Lauran’s but there were guests here now that normally did not attend these functions.

George Washington had taken leave from the army and now celebrated with the troops, James Madison had also made his way up to the north to join the people and the troops to celebrate though the most surprising appearance was the more reserved Thomas Jefferson who had also joined them in celebration; despite the threat looking over them, there was an air of thick joy hanging over the ballroom.

Hamilton stood off to the side watching the events that took place. It was strange to him to be among the richest and most powerful men in America. He did not have their families. Hamilton was born out of wedlock in Charlestown, Nevis. He was orphaned as a child and taken in by a prosperous merchant. When he reached his teens, he was sent to New York to pursue his education. He had climbed by himself into the position he found himself in now.

“Not Easy is it. These Balls can be hard and especially tiering” a women’s voice said as she slid up next to Hamilton smiled. Hamilton admired Eliza Schuyler, she was beautiful and fair. They had met once before and he had admired her from that day. The war had kept them apart but they looked at each other in ways nobody else looked at them. She took hold of his hand and smiled at him.

“Care for a dance,” Eliza asked, her eyes glittered under the candlelight. He took her hand and guided her to the middle of the room. Hamilton let go of his worries for a while, he danced and enjoyed the party. His worries about the future and the past melted away, he enjoyed every moment of that dance. Nobody there that day could think about the war, it was a distant memory but on the horizon, the battle for freedom still continued.
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Eliza Hamilton
.......
The Night wore on heavily, the early evening gave away to the cold late night. George Washington remained late into the night. It was early dawn as he stood on the patio looking over the grounds. All these people relied heavily on him and his army it was a heavyweight he did not like to carry but did so for the people. He wished he could deliver them something to prove their war was not yet lost.​

Then as dawn rose in front of him, like an angel coming down from the heavens. He would take up the Hamilton doctrine. He would attack when they least expected it, a raid to secure supplies at the moment the British would have their guards lowered. On Christmas day they would cross the Delaware River for the first time and strike hard at the British. Washington hoped it would ignite the fire that kept his troops fighting the war for if not the entire army could collapse
 
Great start! The idea of that early seizure giving them confidence to declare independence 2 years early is a new one to me, I did not know about this possibility. I didn't think they were quite ready then but I could see it happening if they decided to really make a stand. The fact it is big in the middle States is a big help I am sure.

Prince and being this timelines Bunker Hill was excellent. The only thing missing was Washington saying not to fire until you see the whites of their eyes. :) The fact you made it still a loss but the British very bloodied makes it realistic.

A few comments.

You have a couple typos, at one point Hawthorne is called Nathaniel which I admit I might have done myself had I been thinking of the last name :), and you have an Erie silence at another point. Although perhaps that was a joke about the Cleveland Browns' offense. :)

Seriously, there will be opposition to the idea of arming a black Battalion, even with a white man leading. However, you could perhaps make it look a little more realistic by having this done in response to what happened in real life. The British offered to free any slaves in Virginia that fought for them, thinking that they would win although possibly not being ready to keep their promises.

So, this radical change being done in response to word of what the British would do makes a lot of sense.

King Louis the XV died in mid 1774. I can imagine Louis XVI dithering over whether to support the Americans and eventually doing it as a way to put his stamp on the monarchy quickly. However, with quick American victories they are also more likely to support the Americans then they were in our timeline.
 

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Great start! The idea of that early seizure giving them confidence to declare independence 2 years early is a new one to me, I did not know about this possibility. I didn't think they were quite ready then but I could see it happening if they decided to really make a stand. The fact it is big in the middle States is a big help I am sure.

Prince and being this timelines Bunker Hill was excellent. The only thing missing was Washington saying not to fire until you see the whites of their eyes. :) The fact you made it still a loss but the British very bloodied makes it realistic.

A few comments.

You have a couple typos, at one point Hawthorne is called Nathaniel which I admit I might have done myself had I been thinking of the last name :), and you have an Erie silence at another point. Although perhaps that was a joke about the Cleveland Browns' offense. :)

Seriously, there will be opposition to the idea of arming a black Battalion, even with a white man leading. However, you could perhaps make it look a little more realistic by having this done in response to what happened in real life. The British offered to free any slaves in Virginia that fought for them, thinking that they would win although possibly not being ready to keep their promises.

So, this radical change being done in response to word of what the British would do makes a lot of sense.

King Louis the XV died in mid 1774. I can imagine Louis XVI dithering over whether to support the Americans and eventually doing it as a way to put his stamp on the monarchy quickly. However, with quick American victories they are also more likely to support the Americans than they were in our timeline.
Thanks for the feedback. helps a lot. been writing on and off since high school but after writing this for 3 months and reaching 1972 i thaught id post it.
 
Chapter Eleven: The Christmas Raid

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Chapter Eleven: The Christmas Raid
25th/26th December 1774
General Washington had been considering some sort of bold move since the great American ball on the 5th Of December. With the arrival of Sullivan's and Gates' forces and the sudden rise of men in his company, Washington felt the time was finally right for some sort of action. With his aid’s they had debated endlessly on a plan and one was finally settled upon. It was a plan full of risk, one wrong move could see the army and Washington himself destroyed. On the 15th December, the American forces pulled out of Trenton for a better defensible position in Philadelphia, letting the British retake the city. It was one advised against by his more senior members of his team including Hamilton but Washington ignored his cries; the British had fallen into their trap by moving into Trenton again.

Washington's plan was for three crossings, with his troops to lead the attack on Trenton. A second column under Cadwalader was to cross at Dunk's Ferry and create a diversion to the south. The third column under Brigadier General James Ewing was to cross at Trenton Ferry and hold the bridge across the Assunpink Creek, just south of Trenton, in order to prevent the enemy's escape by that route. Once Trenton was secure, the combined army would move against the British posts in Princeton and New Brunswick. If the move worked, and the raid went well then, they would secure the security of their freedom for a little while longer.

On the morning of December 25, Washington ordered his army to prepare three days' food He was worried by intelligence reports that the British were planning their own crossing once Delaware was frozen over but it was a worry, he had to put aside. At 4 pm the troops were issued ammunition, and even the officers and musicians were ordered to carry muskets. They were told that they were departing on a secret mission. As they departed the weather got progressively worse, turning from drizzle to rain to sleet and snow. "

Washington was among the first of the troops to cross. These troops formed a sentry line around the landing area in New Jersey, with strict instructions that no one was to pass through. The rest of the army crossed without significant incident, although a few men fell into the water. The amount of ice on the river prevented the artillery from finishing the crossing until 3 am on December 26. On the morning of December 26, as soon as the army was ready, Washington ordered it split into two columns, one under the command of himself and General Greene, the second under General Sullivan. Only three Americans were killed and six wounded, while 22 British were killed with 98 wounded. The Americans captured 1,000 prisoners and seized muskets, powder, and artillery.

Following the battle, Washington had to execute a second crossing that was in some ways more difficult than the first. In the aftermath of the battle, the supplies had been plundered, and, in spite of Washington's explicit orders for its destruction, casks of captured rum were opened, so some of the celebrating troops got drunk. They also had to transport the large numbers of prisoners across the river while keeping them under guard. The victory had a marked effect on the troops' morale. Soldiers celebrated the victory, Washington's role as a leader was secured, and Congress gained renewed enthusiasm for the war. A war that was about to take a southern turn as the year 1775 dawned.
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General Geroge Washinton Crossing the Delaware River; one of the most famous paintings of the American war for independence​
 
Chapter Twelve: Shared Beliefs

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Chapter Twelve: Shared Beliefs
10th January 1775

The new year had come with great relief for the American course, Washington's raid had been successful and further attacks had ceased for the time being. Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson sat in a room together in a small inn in Philadelphia. Jefferson was the one who had called the three together in a meeting. They were three very different men from very different backgrounds but they had one thing in common.

They shared the same beliefs, dreams, and hopes for America. They sat here ten days into the new year bouncing of ideas, political thoughts. It was nothing serious but their time in Philadelphia during the winter had drawn the three closer together as political allies and friends. Yet their time together was to soon be cut short. Jefferson was returning home to the south; Adams would be returning to congress and Hamilton would be returning to the war. Now was the time to strike, Adams knew that.

“We need something more than thoughts. I propose a society. The Advancement of American Freedom. Work towards the end of slavery and the spreading of rights for all Americans” Adams said, Jefferson, choked on his tea. So that’s why these two had become close to him, to wrangle him into supporting the end of slavery.

“I can’t do that. It would end my political support in the south. I would be hounded out of my home” Jefferson protested. Jefferson for once felt out of power and out of control of a situation. He hated and despised slavery though they knew that. His life and home would go to ruin without it.

“You forced slavery into the declaration Thomas. You don’t have to openly support us. We don’t even have to put slavery to the forefront of our agenda. Not until the time is right” Hamilton pointed out, they had him trapped like an animal. He hated that they were right.

“I will support you. But for now, in secret. It’s the only way” Jefferson admitted. He could not win this battle, not when these two had roped him in. But secretly deep-down Jefferson was happy. The three continued to talk, hashing out the way the new society would work and the ideals they would take and grow. Unbeknownst to the three, they had established the foundation for America’s first political party.
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Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Alexander hamilton.
Laid the foundation for the first political party.
 
Chapter Thirteen: On Friendly Terms

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Chapter Thirteen: On Friendly Terms
15th March 1775
Under the terms of the 1763 Treaty of Paris, which ended the Seven Years' War (the French and Indian War), Spain ceded Spanish Florida to Britain. At the same time, Britain received all of French Louisiana east of the Mississippi River, with the exception of New Orleans, from France. Determining the new territory too large to administer as one unit, Britain divided its new southeastern acquisitions into two new colonies separated by the Apalachicola River: East Florida, with its capital in the old Spanish city of St. Augustine, and West Florida, with its capital at Pensacola.

Now as the war for America’s freedom burned. West Florida saw its own chance for freedom. Patrick Tonyn was captured by the West Floridan’s in February and executed. John Moultrie though from England had favored the American course. He was invited to take control of West Florida and did so knowing what would happen. Now West Florida declared freedom from the British, establishing the republic of Western Florida. The British had not reacted well. An army of a thousand men was sent from East Florida to capture the republic and hang those who had become traitors. Sir Henry Clinton was dispatched to do the job. West Florida was left defenseless, reacting to the news Washington sent Nathanael Greene and an army of two thousand American’s. The Two Large forces clashed at Greenville. The British expected to win but the American’s supplied by weapons and canons secured in west Florida destroyed the British forces forcing them back into East Florida. The American’s did not pressure west Florida into annexation but instead, negotiations began.
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(Map Of West and East Florida)
.............
James Madison was used to southern heat but here in West Florida, it was even worse. The large window’s in the governor’s office were open but there was no breeze. It was stifling even him. The governor himself seemed uncomfortable though they had British forces pounding at the door even though they had won. Madison had been sent as a diplomat from America to the new republic, he felt a case of the flu coming on but agreed to go anyway.

“I am sorry sir. But the congress of the east republic cannot accept annexation to you yet. You have no government, not properly” Moultrie explained. Madison felt the blow, their first goal had failed and congress would not be happy.

“We can however to keep your troops here and begun proper talks once the war is over” Moultrie added. Madison sighed in relief, at least they could keep their troops. Madison did not tell Moultrie that they planned to invade western Florida he could find out when it was time. Madison was not sure why congress wanted east Florida but it was what it was. He just couldn't wait to escape back to the south. He hated this bug-filled hellhole.

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James Madison: First American Diplomat​
 
Chapter Fourteen: Temptation Takes Control

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Chapter Fourteen: Temptation Takes Control
July 16th, 1775
July, more than a year into the war now and still only small battles took place across the eastern states. John Laurens had not yet taken his fight back to the south due to events. He had returned briefly to the south and in that time had become married to Martha Manning. Hamilton had seen more combat than his counterpart fighting in the Battle of Princeton and the battle of Montgomery. Hamilton had also married to Eliza Schuyler. The pair rode in silence across the plains of new jersey, keeping an eye out for British scouts.

The pair came across a house and stopped. There was fire lit inside but no sounds. This carefully and quietly dismounted, taking the pistoles and riffles they snuck closer to the house. Hamilton peered through the window but saw nobody, the house seemed empty. They slowly entered the home; it was deserted but there was nobody here. There was a bit of food on the table and a fire burned.

“There’s nobody here,” Hamilton said, he looked over at empty bottles. They were often wearing British soldiers using houses like this as spy dens but neither of them could confirm that’s what this was. It was empty and recently used but many refugees fleeing north did the same. They would just have to make the hut down in their maps as one to watch. The pair looked around before stopping and looking at each other. Time slowed down then they advanced towards each other and time felt like it was melting away. What they did was a sin and illegal but, in those moments, neither of them cared.
.......
George Washington stood looking over a map of the northern states. Since the start of the war, they had laid under oppression by British forces. But since they had begun focusing on pushing down into Pennsylvania, their control of the northern states had stagnated. Now there were reports of skirmishes into Lexington and Concorde. If this was true, an armed force in the north could take Boston from the British. Hamilton entered the tent, his appearance as a lot rougher than Washington accepted but he said nothing.

“Sir. Congress has granted you funds and more troops to launch a northern incursion” Hamilton said. Washington smiled. William Prescott would lead the charge; it would take a while to prepare but he was the man to do it. they would begin a more northern campaign and liberate Boston. It would not be an easy task.
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A painting of The Boston Massacre. Occupying British Forces open fire on a protesting group of American people.
Known now to be one of the reasons for the push to liberate the city.​
 
Chapter Fifteen: Battle of Providence

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Chapter Fifteen: Battle of Providence
October 7th, 1775
Thomas Gage stood in his quarters milling over a big meal of ham and roasted vegetables. Gage was not happy with his lack of command. He had been put in charge of looking after Boston and the local area but he felt little threat. He longed for a fight, for a battle. He looked down at his meal and smiled at least he had ways to get food still. He smiled and was about to eat when an aid rushed into his room panting.

“I am eating. Do not interrupt” Gage insisted as he took a bite of the ham. Then without warning a cannonball exploded through the wall taking out the aid. His blood and guts splattered across Gage’s face. He fell backward in horror as a second cannonball tore through the roof. How was this even possible? The American army was so far away, a sound like thunder echoed through the office as the cannonballs continued to fire. He pulled himself from his feet and ran out into the corridor screaming the America’ are coming but by now the whole command chain was in disarray.

Outside the city, the American’s advanced on the unaware British. Bombard by sea, attacked from the land. The British forces fell in full retreat from the onslaught, Gage along with them. By early afternoon Providence had fallen. The British flag was pulled down and the American flag hoisted up. No celebrations took place, they had taken Providence but they had not yet taken Boston and now the British would know they were coming.
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American Troops Charge Toward Providence
.......
Archibald Campbell stood on the deck of the British frigate. He had been granted the privilege of putting down the traitors by invading the south. The ship lurched forward; its canon’s primed. They would not attack until the early hours of the morning but when they did their pathetic city would be leveled to the ground. Burn and advance, leave nothing standing.

By attacking the south, they hoped to trap the American’s in Pennsylvania and kill them outright. It would not be easy but their landing would be the beginning of it. Campbell turned to the captain and smiled. All of them were glad to be here, ready for the battle that lay ahead of them. Campbell would get revenge for the attack on providence.

“Take her slow captain. We don’t want these dogs to find out what we're up to” Campbell ordered. As the American’s in the north, the surprise would be their friend. The American’s were about to feel the power of the royal navy and Campbell could not wait to see the terror in the white of their eyes. He would surely get medals for this. For ending the war and restoring the rightful order of King George the III.
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Archibald Campbell: Leader of the British forces In the southern theater
 
Chapter Sixteen: Siege of Boston

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Chapter Sixteen: Siege of Boston
December 28th, 1775- March 17th, 1777
William Prescott formed a siege line extending from Chelsea, around the peninsulas of Boston and Charlestown, to Roxbury, effectively surrounding Boston on three sides. All entrances to the city were blocked off leaving only the harbor and sea access under British control. In the days immediately following the creation of the siege line, the size of the colonial forces grew, as troops from New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut arrived on the scene. General Gage turned his attention to fortifying easily defensible positions. In the south, at Roxbury, Gage ordered lines of defenses with 10 twenty-four-pound guns. In Boston proper, four hills were quickly fortified. They were to be the main defense of the city. Over time, each of these hills was strengthened.

Gage also decided to abandon Charlestown, removing the forces to Boston. The town of Charlestown itself was entirely vacant, and the high lands of Charlestown (Bunker Hill and Breed's Hill) were left undefended, as were the heights of Dorchester, which had a commanding view of the harbor and the city. The British at first greatly restricted movement in and out of the city, fearing the infiltration of weapons. Besieged and besiegers eventually reached an informal agreement allowing traffic on the Boston Neck, provided no firearms were carried. Residents of Boston turned in almost 2,000 muskets, and most of the Patriot residents left the city. Many Loyalists who lived outside the city of Boston left their homes and fled into the city. Most of them felt that it was not safe to live outside of the city, because the Patriots were now in control of the countryside.

Because the siege did not blockade the harbor, the city remained open for the Royal Navy, under Vice-Admiral Samuel Graves, to bring in supplies from Nova Scotia and other places. Colonial forces could do little to stop these shipments due to the naval supremacy of the British fleet. Nevertheless, American privateers were able to harass supply ships, and food prices rose quickly. Soon the shortages meant the British forces were on short rations. Generally, the American forces were able to gather information about what was happening in the city from people escaping the privations of Boston, but General Gage had no effective intelligence of rebel activities.

General George Washington arrived at Cambridge on July 2. He set up his headquarters at the Benjamin Wadsworth House at Harvard College. By this time forces and supplies were arriving, including companies of riflemen from as far away as Maryland and Virginia. On July 16, he moved his headquarters to the John Vassall House, also in Cambridge, that would later become well known as the home of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Toward the end of July, about 2,000 riflemen arrived in units raised in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia. The accuracy of the rifle was previously unknown in New England, and these forces were used to harass the besieged forces.

Washington summoned a council of war, and made a case for an all-out amphibious assault on Boston, by sending troops across Back Bay in flat-bottomed boats which could hold 50 men each. Washington believed it would be extremely difficult to keep the men together when winter came. In a war council, the plan was unanimously rejected, and the decision was not to attack. Between November 1776 and February 1777, Colonel Henry Knox and a team of engineers used sleds to retrieve 60 tons of heavy artillery that had been captured at Fort Ticonderoga. Bringing them across the frozen Hudson and Connecticut rivers in a difficult, complex operation, they arrived back at Cambridge on January 24, 1777.

Some of the Ticonderoga cannons, which were of a size and range not previously available to the Americans, were emplaced in fortifications around the city, and on the night of March 2, 1777, the Americans began to bombard the city with those cannon, to which the British responded with cannonades of their own. The American guns, under the direction of Colonel Knox, continued to exchange fire with the British until March 4. The exchange of fire did little damage to either side, although it did damage houses and kill some British soldiers in Boston.

On March 5, Washington moved more of the Ticonderoga cannon and several thousand men overnight to occupy Dorchester Heights, overlooking Boston. Since it was winter, the ground was frozen, which made the digging of trenches impractical. Rufus Putnam developed a plan to fortify the heights using defenses made of heavy timbers and fascines. These were prefabricated out of sight of the British and brought in overnight. The British fleet was within range of the American guns on Dorchester Heights, putting it and the troops in the city at risk. The immediate response of the British was a two-hour cannon barrage at the heights, which had no effect because the British guns could not reach the American guns at such height. After the failure of the barrage, Howe and his officers agreed that the colonists must be removed from the heights if they were to hold Boston. They planned an assault on the heights; however, due to a storm the attack never took place, and the British elected instead to withdraw.

On March 10, 1776, General Howe issued a proclamation ordering the inhabitants to give up all linen and woolen goods that could be used by the colonists to continue the war. A Loyalist, Crean Brush, was authorized to receive these goods, in return for which he gave certificates that were effectively worthless. Over the next week, the British fleet sat in Boston harbor waiting for favorable winds, while Loyalists and British soldiers were loaded onto the ships. During this time, American naval activities outside the harbor successfully captured and diverted to ports under colonial control several British supply ships. On March 15, the wind became favorable, but before they could leave, it turned against them. On March 17, the wind once again turned favorable. The troops, who were authorized to burn the town if there were any disturbances while they were marching to their ships, began to move out at 4:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., all ships were underway. The fleet departing from Boston included 120 ships, with more than 11,000 people aboard. Of those, 9,906 were British troops, 667 were women, and 553 were children.

………….

Once the British fleet sailed away, the Americans moved to reclaim Boston and Charlestown. At first, they thought that the British were still on Bunker Hill, but it turned out that the British had left dummies in place. Due to the risk of smallpox, at first, only men picked for their prior exposure to the disease entered Boston under the command of Artemas Ward. More of the colonial army entered on March 20, 1776, once the risk of disease was judged low. While Washington had essentially acceded to the British threat to burn Boston and had not hindered their departure from the city, he did not make their escape from the outer harbor entirely easy. He directed Captain Manley to harass the departing British fleet, in which he had some success.

General Howe, when his fleet finally left the outer harbor, left in his wake a small contingent of vessels whose primary purpose was to intercept any arriving British vessels. While they successfully redirected to Halifax numerous ships carrying British troops originally destined for Boston, some unsuspecting British troop ships landed in Boston, only to fall into American hands. The British departure ended major military activities in the New England colonies. The siege of Boston had lasted almost two years, ending in March of 1777. During that time, Washington had learned another battle was taking place across the sea, if It was won then the balance could finally be turned over to the Americans once and for all.
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The Seige Of Boston and the British Leaving Boston​
 
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