The Queen is Dead!: Katherine of Aragon dies in 1518

NotBigBrother

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Lionel and Christina is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in approximately 1590, nearly 60 years after the actual events that the play is based upon. This play is seen as the romantic prequel to the Lionel trilogy.
Final of "Lionel and Christina"
"No happier story we have seen
Than this of Lionel and Christin'. "
 
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I've put a rough family tree for the Francis-Mary idea in the 'Alternate Lineages' thread. I have one or two scenes in mind, so I might turn it into a TLIAW one day soon - but not before I've finished this one, I promise!
 
Oh, in what sense? :)
Meaning I would be interested to read that. Also, with different genetic input, the Valois line may have just a little more staying power, or a whole lot less, depending on how the genetic dice shake out.

OTL, Henry II's marriage to Catherine DeMedici was a pure genetic disaster. So, if Francis I's kids have a different genetic outcome, maybe the generation after will have different genetic outcomes too.
 
Meaning I would be interested to read that. Also, with different genetic input, the Valois line may have just a little more staying power, or a whole lot less, depending on how the genetic dice shake out.

OTL, Henry II's marriage to Catherine DeMedici was a pure genetic disaster. So, if Francis I's kids have a different genetic outcome, maybe the generation after will have different genetic outcomes too.
But then Mary Tudor wasn't the healthiest either - she died young of consumption, which I have decided doesn't kill her here, given she's in a warmer climate than the Norfolk broads... Still, with her brother as an example, i can't say her genes would necessarily be much better than Catherine's. But I do like the idea of Mary's son becoming King of France, just like her brother always wanted to be.
 
But then Mary Tudor wasn't the healthiest either - she died young of consumption, which I have decided doesn't kill her here, given she's in a warmer climate than the Norfolk broads... Still, with her brother as an example, i can't say her genes would necessarily be much better than Catherine's. But I do like the idea of Mary's son becoming King of France, just like her brother always wanted to be.
Another thought that has occurred to me (yes, I know we're getting off topic, but it's my thread and I don't mind...) with an English-born Queen of France, the Boleyn girls may not be brought home, so I could see Anne, at least, making a French match in a Francis-Mary Timeline. Any suggestions as to who?
 

NotBigBrother

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Absolutely! Hell, I stole the idea of there being such a thing as 'storm-sent lovers' ITTL from Romeo and Juliet's 'star-crossed lovers' in the first place!
Wait until TTL analogue of "Walt Disney Company" grab this story in their hands.
 
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Epilogue II: The Boleyns of Ormonde and Pembroke
…Fortunately for the hopes of the Boleyn dynasty, neither Edmund nor his sister Matilda inherited their parents’ fertility issues. Matilda managed six surviving children with the 4th Earl of Derby, one of them the famous circumnavigator of the globe, Sir Edmund Stanley, and Edmund fathered twelve children on Lady Grace Fitzroy, nine of whom lived to adulthood.

Over the next three centuries, the Boleyns rose to become prominent Anglo-Celtic lords, their lands stretching across both sides of the Irish Sea. Unlike many other powerful Marcher dynasties, however, they never wavered in their loyalties to the Tudors in London. In fact, the families were so closely interwoven that more than one Boleyn girl became Queen of England or Duchess of York and Normandy down the generations.

As such, when Ireland was made a Kingdom in 1848 as part of the Tudor effort to bind the Irish more closely into the Crown, for fear they might seek to take advantage of the turmoil that was setting large swathes of Central Europe ablaze, it seemed only logical to name a Boleyn as head of the vice-regal government in Dublin.

Charles Edward Boleyn, 12th Earl of Ormonde, 11th Earl of Pembroke and 11th Baron of Upper Ossory, was named to the post of Viceroy of Ireland in August 1848. Indeed, in a grand imperial acknowledgement of Boleyn loyalty, the post was made hereditary two years later. Unlike the titles, however, the Vice-regal post was entailed to male heirs only. As it happens, that hasn’t mattered, for the Boleyns have always run to sons as well as daughters. The current holder of all four glittering posts is the 20th Earl of Ormonde and 19th Earl of Pembroke, Ralph Boleyn.

It is my aim, within these pages, to trace the rise of the ‘thrice-titled dynasty’, as Shakespeare once called the Anglo-Celtic Boleyns, and also to flesh out the personalities of each successive Earl and Baron, who are so often limited to the cold glory of their impressive string of peerages. It is my hope that, one day, this book will stand as, if not a seminal joint biography, then, at least a key primer in understanding the Boleyns, and with them, Ireland, and its place in the Tudor Empire.

______________ Rachel Wincraft, ‘“Introduction”, The Thrice-Titled Dynasty: The Boleyns of Ormonde, Pembroke and Upper Ossory’​
 
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