I'm sad to see the timeline end but I suppose the party had to finish at some point. Looking forward to the final few updates.

My dream project is to write a timeline set in a world where Scottish home rule is implemented in 1914 or, perhaps more manageably from a writing point of view, 1979. Although I doubt I'd ever get around to writing it, your timeline is really inspiring as it shows the dynamism that occurs in regional politics, something which is criminally under focused upon in OTL UK.
That is possible as a general Uk wide devolution package was mooted in talks between certain Unionists including FE Smith and the Liberals as a solution to the Irish/Ulster question. If those talks had proven successful....
 
That is possible as a general Uk wide devolution package was mooted in talks between certain Unionists including FE Smith and the Liberals as a solution to the Irish/Ulster question. If those talks had proven successful....
Actually Scottish home rule was set to pass at the same time as Irish home rule. The Bill had just passed it's second reading before WW1 broke out. Scotland had to wait another 83 years before it was to receive self rule and even then the proposed powers of the 1914 Scottish parliament far outweigh the those held by the modern parliament today.

The Hansard of the 2nd reading can be found below. Its an absolutely fascinating debate and a completely forgotten piece of history.

While this short BBC article from 2014 is also worth a read:

EDIT: Rereading that above debate I found a line which has always rung true to me. ' Scotland has become a reservoir for the filling up of Canada.' William Cowan couldn't know how right he was. Between that line being said in 1914 and 2001 Scotland's population increased by 180,000 people, or 3.7%. Almost the entirety of Scotland's population increase during that period was exported. In comparison Scotland's population increased by 233,000 or by 4.6% from 2001 to 2011, in just ten years.

Anyway, I'll stop derailing the thread. But a federal system for the UK in the 1910s is, to my mind, the only thing that could of saved the UK.
 
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Epilogue Articles: The SNP
Feeling the Strain: The SNP, Scotland and the Union

By Chris Deerin


One of recent history's great questions is what if the Diana Crisis never happened? Scotland’s fate would’ve been considerably different, whilst the Blair Government was planning on passing devolution before Diana’s assassination, it was much less radical and sweeping than the post-Diana federal system.

We might not have seen the rise of the SNP, at least nationally, they would be locked behind an iron cage of First Past the Post. Maybe in another life, Labour still rules Scotland and Nicola Sturgeon remains a fairly unknown MSP.

Despite devolution, the party was fairly quiet in the early years of the Commonwealth, whilst they always performed well in the Scottish Parliament and Senate, they lacked coalition partners as Labour and the Liberal Democrats closed ranks in a Unionist pact.

This would all change in 2008, after losing its majority, the Lab/Lib Coalition of First Minister Jim Murphy would invite the Conservatives into a Grand Unionist Coalition, enraging many parts of Scottish society.

After this, the SNP’s momentum was unstoppable, and in 2014 they seized the Premiership, the Parliament and brokered a confidence and supply deal with the Ed Balls Government, securing the Independence Referendum holy grail for May 2017.

Whilst they lost the Referendum in 2017 and their popular First Minister Derek MacKay, the SNP became stronger and stronger, as the Traffic Light Coalition’s majority shrunk to the single digits.

It was at this time the cracks in the SNP began to form. Whilst there had always been “fundies” and pragmatists in the party, the fundamentalists became increasingly agitated that Sturgeon refused to stick the knife in and demand Indyref2.

Personal clashes between Salmond and Sturgeon would fuel these divisions as Salmond was arrested for sexual assault charges. Culminating in the 2019 Progressive Alliance Primary, where two SNP figures ran against each other, breaking the party’s decade long show of unity.

Whilst the commentariat have been predicting SNP splits for years, it is hard to see how much longer the party can hold together, Sturgeon has questions to answer around her role in the Salmond affair, and questions of referendums and trans rights continue to pile pressure on the party.

With this said here are the runners and riders for the SNPs leadership over the next few years

Premier Nicola Sturgeon

1614167169322.png


The Queen - Sturgeon’s year hasn’t been all bad, she grew her caucus in both the Scottish and Westminster Parliaments in 2020, and Sunak’s ascension to Downing Street has finally given her a Tory enemy to fight back against. Back in opposition, Sturgeon can now focus on her own house, rather than keeping Miliband’s squabbling coalition together. Still, when you’re at the top there’s only one way left to go.

Deputy Premier Humza Yousef

1614167202347.png


The Right Hand - Yousef made history when he became Scotland’s first BME Deputy Premier, becoming Deputy Premier at just 28 years of age. Yousef has used his mostly ceremonial position to campaign against hate speech and act as a loyal surrogate for Sturgeon on TV. Popular with party elites, and with a powerful story to tell, Yousef is definitely a frontrunner.

First Minister Kate Forbes

1614167223495.png


The Understudy - Deputy First Minister to Derek MacKay, Forbes was thrust into the limelight as acting First Minister after his resignation, aged just 25. Forbes was expected just to be a stand-in but she impressed SNP supporters so much she was reelected as Leader in the Scottish Parliament. Another of Sturgeon's bright-young things, Forbes has seen an incredible rise, the Premiership is a logical next step

Senator Angus Robertson

1614167296460.png


The Second Chance - Robertson has held almost every major job in the SNP, MSP, Scottsh Parliament Leader, MP, Westminster Leader and now Senator. Robertson has been impeccably loyal to Sturgeon as others in the Westminsiter caucus increasingly break with Holyrood. He has strong relations with other parties, and has been credited with keeping the deal with Labour going as long as it has, whilst not exciting, Robertson would be a safe choice.

Scottish Senate Leader John Swinney

1614167326088.png


The Veteran - Swinney has led the SNP’s regional Senate Caucus since 2007 and stood as the Sturgeonite candidate for President in 2019. Swinney’s one drawback is that he is well into his 50s, at a time when many in the party are agitating for a generational change. A politician who’s been in the SNP since the 70s probably isn’t the best bet for that change, but don’t count Swinney out yet.

Senator Joanna Cherry

1614167362712.png


The Wrecking Ball - From trans rights to the Salmond trial, Cherry remains the SNP leadership’s biggest headache. Despite this, she has a loyal backing amongst the SNP’s core base, especially the “cyber-nats” and nationalist bloggers like “Wings over Scotland”, she also has the all-important blessing of Alex Salmond. She’s unlikely to win a head-to-head matchup with the Sturgeonites, but stranger things have happened.

Senator Michael Matheson

1614167414315.png


The Jack of All Trades - Matheson has served as Health and Justice Minister, before moving down to Westminster to serve as an SNP Senator. Matheson has kept a relatively low profile, opting to avoid the factional clashes around the party. Matheson has few friends but also few enemies. If all the other candidates magically drop dead he could act as a unity candidate

Senator Stewart Hosie

1614167438916.png


The Money Man - Hailing from the right of the party, Hosie has alienated some activists for his support of corporation tax cuts and financial deregulation in a post-independence Scotland. In 2016 he was hit by a sex scandal that nearly led to his resignation, but he managed to hold on. A long-time critic of the Traffic Light Coalition, Hosie would certainly be a different kind of SNP leader.

Senator Shona Robinson

1614167464747.png


The Pal - A close personal friend of Sturgeon, Robinson served as a Junior Minister in Sturgeon's Government before being elected to the Senate in 2015. Robinson has connections across the party and has acted as Sturgeon’s bridge to the often rebellious Westminster group. However, she may be seen as too close to the Sturgeon wing of the party.

Andrew Wilson MP

1614167490369.png


The Economist - An interesting outside bet. Whilst he lacks a major public profile amongst ordinary voters, Wilson has been a strong voice on the gradualist wing of the party for many years, has a big brain, and is well liked and well connected across the political establishment. His continued hunger for public service remains obvious – don’t count him out.
 
Feeling the Strain: The SNP, Scotland and the Union

By Chris Deerin


One of recent history's great questions is what if the Diana Crisis never happened? Scotland’s fate would’ve been considerably different, whilst the Blair Government was planning on passing devolution before Diana’s assassination, it was much less radical and sweeping than the post-Diana federal system.

We might not have seen the rise of the SNP, at least nationally, they would be locked behind an iron cage of First Past the Post. Maybe in another life, Labour still rules Scotland and Nicola Sturgeon remains a fairly unknown MSP.

Despite devolution, the party was fairly quiet in the early years of the Commonwealth, whilst they always performed well in the Scottish Parliament and Senate, they lacked coalition partners as Labour and the Liberal Democrats closed ranks in a Unionist pact.

This would all change in 2008, after losing its majority, the Lab/Lib Coalition of First Minister Jim Murphy would invite the Conservatives into a Grand Unionist Coalition, enraging many parts of Scottish society.

After this, the SNP’s momentum was unstoppable, and in 2014 they seized the Premiership, the Parliament and brokered a confidence and supply deal with the Ed Balls Government, securing the Independence Referendum holy grail for May 2017.

Whilst they lost the Referendum in 2017 and their popular First Minister Derek MacKay, the SNP became stronger and stronger, as the Traffic Light Coalition’s majority shrunk to the single digits.

It was at this time the cracks in the SNP began to form. Whilst there had always been “fundies” and pragmatists in the party, the fundamentalists became increasingly agitated that Sturgeon refused to stick the knife in and demand Indyref2.

Personal clashes between Salmond and Sturgeon would fuel these divisions as Salmond was arrested for sexual assault charges. Culminating in the 2019 Progressive Alliance Primary, where two SNP figures ran against each other, breaking the party’s decade long show of unity.

Whilst the commentariat have been predicting SNP splits for years, it is hard to see how much longer the party can hold together, Sturgeon has questions to answer around her role in the Salmond affair, and questions of referendums and trans rights continue to pile pressure on the party.

With this said here are the runners and riders for the SNPs leadership over the next few years

Premier Nicola Sturgeon

View attachment 628239

The Queen - Sturgeon’s year hasn’t been all bad, she grew her caucus in both the Scottish and Westminster Parliaments in 2020, and Sunak’s ascension to Downing Street has finally given her a Tory enemy to fight back against. Back in opposition, Sturgeon can now focus on her own house, rather than keeping Miliband’s squabbling coalition together. Still, when you’re at the top there’s only one way left to go.

Deputy Premier Humza Yousef

View attachment 628240

The Right Hand - Yousef made history when he became Scotland’s first BME Deputy Premier, becoming Deputy Premier at just 28 years of age. Yousef has used his mostly ceremonial position to campaign against hate speech and act as a loyal surrogate for Sturgeon on TV. Popular with party elites, and with a powerful story to tell, Yousef is definitely a frontrunner.

First Minister Kate Forbes

View attachment 628241


The Understudy - Deputy First Minister to Derek MacKay, Forbes was thrust into the limelight as acting First Minister after his resignation, aged just 25. Forbes was expected just to be a stand-in but she impressed SNP supporters so much she was reelected as Leader in the Scottish Parliament. Another of Sturgeon's bright-young things, Forbes has seen an incredible rise, the Premiership is a logical next step

Senator Angus Robertson

View attachment 628242

The Second Chance - Robertson has held almost every major job in the SNP, MSP, Scottsh Parliament Leader, MP, Westminster Leader and now Senator. Robertson has been impeccably loyal to Sturgeon as others in the Westminsiter caucus increasingly break with Holyrood. He has strong relations with other parties, and has been credited with keeping the deal with Labour going as long as it has, whilst not exciting, Robertson would be a safe choice.

Scottish Senate Leader John Swinney

View attachment 628243

The Veteran - Swinney has led the SNP’s regional Senate Caucus since 2007 and stood as the Sturgeonite candidate for President in 2019. Swinney’s one drawback is that he is well into his 50s, at a time when many in the party are agitating for a generational change. A politician who’s been in the SNP since the 70s probably isn’t the best bet for that change, but don’t count Swinney out yet.

Senator Joanna Cherry

View attachment 628246

The Wrecking Ball - From trans rights to the Salmond trial, Cherry remains the SNP leadership’s biggest headache. Despite this, she has a loyal backing amongst the SNP’s core base, especially the “cyber-nats” and nationalist bloggers like “Wings over Scotland”, she also has the all-important blessing of Alex Salmond. She’s unlikely to win a head-to-head matchup with the Sturgeonites, but stranger things have happened.

Senator Michael Matheson

View attachment 628247

The Jack of All Trades - Matheson has served as Health and Justice Minister, before moving down to Westminster to serve as an SNP Senator. Matheson has kept a relatively low profile, opting to avoid the factional clashes around the party. Matheson has few friends but also few enemies. If all the other candidates magically drop dead he could act as a unity candidate

Senator Stewart Hosie

View attachment 628248


The Money Man - Hailing from the right of the party, Hosie has alienated some activists for his support of corporation tax cuts and financial deregulation in a post-independence Scotland. In 2016 he was hit by a sex scandal that nearly led to his resignation, but he managed to hold on. A long-time critic of the Traffic Light Coalition, Hosie would certainly be a different kind of SNP leader.

Senator Shona Robinson

View attachment 628249

The Pal - A close personal friend of Sturgeon, Robinson served as a Junior Minister in Sturgeon's Government before being elected to the Senate in 2015. Robinson has connections across the party and has acted as Sturgeon’s bridge to the often rebellious Westminster group. However, she may be seen as too close to the Sturgeon wing of the party.

Andrew Wilson MP

View attachment 628250


The Economist - An interesting outside bet. Whilst he lacks a major public profile amongst ordinary voters, Wilson has been a strong voice on the gradualist wing of the party for many years, has a big brain, and is well liked and well connected across the political establishment. His continued hunger for public service remains obvious – don’t count him out.
I’m loving the DBWI bit at the start, speculating about what would have happened if Blair’s OTL devolution plans had passed!
 
Epilogue Articles: The Royal Family
1614249232220.png

The Windsor's Decennium Horribilis

By Helen Thompson


In 1992 Elizabeth Windsor referred to her year as an “Annus horribilis”, Latin for horrible year. The Royal Family had seen the ongoing drama with Princess Diana and the suicide of her nephew Prince Albrecht. At the end of the year, a fire even broke out in Windsor Castle, a string of bad luck or a bad omen? I will leave that up to you.

Of course what followed was the Diana Affair in 97, exile to Canada and the rise of the Commonwealth of Britain. In the years since the Windsor's grip on their once global Empire has continued to loosen, this culminated in the loss of Australia in 2017, the greatest loss to the Royals since their exile in 1999.

Even once-loyal Canada is starting to waver, royalist Prime Minister Peter MacKay did little to stop the extradition of Prince Andrew to the United States, the progressive NDP and Green parties have adopted an official position of republicanism and several senior Liberal Party politicians are looking to follow suit, should the Opposition win in 2023, the Windsor’s last major bastion might come under threat.

Now questions are beginning to be raised about the succession, the Queen is 94 years old and despite her wealth and power, the invisible threat of the Coronavirus still stalks the land. Many within Rideau Hall fear if the Crown should pass to the incredibly unpopular Prince Charles, it would mark the end of the British Monarchy.

Some factions within the Commonwealth are agitating for the Crown to skip the “Diana generation” and go straight towards the much more popular Prince William, unlike his brother Harry, William has remained mostly quiet around his mother's assassination and avoided criticising his family directly, living a private, quiet life in London.

Of course, such a move would be an unprecedented break of succession rules, Charles and his traditionalist faction would be unlikely to go quietly but if Peter MacKay and Amy Adams demand it, there is little Charles could do to stop it.

The third option is for the Monarchy to end with Elizabeth, the longest-serving Monarch also being the last has some kind of poetic ring to it, Elizabeth has steered her family through the post-war period and its greats tribulations since the English Civil War, she has big boots to fill whoever replaces her. Elizabeth has provided the answer to the question of why the world has a monarchy for seven decades, without her, that question remains stubbornly unanswered.

- New Statesman, 2020
 
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Deputy Premier Humza Yousef

First Minister Kate Forbes

Senator Angus Robertson

Interesting to see how people's careers are different from OTL. Andrew Wilson not running Charlotte Street Partners is a big deal, the SNP economic policy is written by CSP atm.

The above three are the only ones who are likely to become leader after Nikita. You can probably rule Forbes out because she's a wee free and won't be popular with the party's dominant Liberal wing. Robertson is hated by the party's left, myself included, but I doubt the left of the party is strong enough to oppose his candidacy. My thoughts are it would come down to Yousef and Robertson, and if Robertson wins 25-30% of the membership leaves. Cherry would be an also ran. She has the support of the Salmondites and some rad fems but there aren't enough of those left in the party to make a difference.
 
View attachment 628527
The Windsor's Decennium Horribilis

By Helen Thompson


In 1992 Elizabeth Windsor referred to her year as an “Annus horribilis”, Latin for horrible year. The Royal Family had seen the ongoing drama with Princess Diana and the suicide of her nephew Prince Albrecht. At the end of the year, a fire even broke out in Windsor Castle, a string of bad luck or a bad omen? I will leave that up to you.

Of course what followed was the Diana Affair, exile to Canada and the rise of the Commonwealth of Britain. In the years since the Windsor's grip on their once global Empire has continued to loosen, this culminated in the loss of Australia in 2017, the greatest loss to the Royals since their exile in 1999.

Even once-loyal Canada is starting to waver, royalist Prime Minister Peter MacKay did little to stop the extradition of Prince Andrew to the United States, the progressive NDP and Green parties have adopted an official position of republicanism and several senior Liberal Party politicians are looking to follow suit, should the Opposition win in 2023, the Windsor’s last major bastion might come under threat.

Now questions are beginning to be raised about the succession, the Queen is 94 years old and despite her wealth and power, the invisible threat of the Coronavirus still stalks the land. Many within Rideau Hall fear if the Crown should pass to the incredibly unpopular Prince Charles, it would mark the end of the British Monarchy.

Some factions within the Commonwealth are agitating for the Crown to skip the “Diana generation” and go straight towards the much more popular Prince William, unlike his brother Harry, William has remained mostly quiet around his mother's assassination and avoided criticising his family directly, living a private, quiet life in London.

Of course, such a move would be an unprecedented break of succession rules, Charles and his traditionalist faction would be unlikely to go quietly but if Peter MacKay and Amy Adams demand it, there is little Charles could do to stop it.

The third option is for the Monarchy to end with Elizabeth, the longest-serving Monarch also being the last has some kind of poetic ring to it, Elizabeth has steered her family through the post-war period and its greats tribulations since the English Civil War, she has big boots to fill whoever replaces her. Elizabeth has provided the answer to the question of why the world has a monarchy for seven decades, without her, that question remains stubbornly unanswered.

- New Statesman, 2020
Damn I kinda feel sorry for the Royal family. Being in exile and watching Britain and Australia become independent must be a little bitter for Elizabeth plus all the family troubles she's had to endure
 
Damn I kinda feel sorry for the Royal family. Being in exile and watching Britain and Australia become independent must be a little bitter for Elizabeth plus all the family troubles she's had to endure
Well, if she had her daughter in law assassinated using her influence, then that would be a fundamental betrayal of the trust her people put in her and the oath she took. In this world, she would only have herself to blame for ending a history stretching back a thousand years. The Commonwealth was within its rights to wash their hands of the whole pack of em in this world. She was lucky Parliament didn't dust off the ol' block used for Great-Uncle Chucky.
 
Well, if she had her daughter in law assassinated using her influence, then that would be a fundamental betrayal of the trust her people put in her and the oath she took. In this world, she would only have herself to blame for ending a history stretching back a thousand years. The Commonwealth was within its rights to wash their hands of the whole pack of em in this world. She was lucky Parliament didn't dust off the ol' block used for Great-Uncle Chucky.
True. No one to blame but herself
 
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Epilogue Articles: The United States and the Special Relationship
1614340863431.png


The Special Relationship: A Tale of Presidents

By Ailbhe Rea


The end of the UK marked a turning point for the special relationship, who would the US President have cups of tea with now? It allowed Blair, long the junior partner to Bill Clinton, to assert himself as a Head of State, and an equal, now that both leading anglophone nations have Presidents, personal relationships have mattered as much as the political.

The “special relationship” has been rocky. Whilst President Blair enjoyed strong relations with Bill Clinton and George Bush (some might say too strong), the relationship between Bush and Michael Howard was considerably cooler, despite them both being conservatives. Howard had upset many in the administration due to his criticism of the Bush/Blair relationship.

When Obama was in the Whitehouse the relationship improved, but not by much. Obama’s “change” message didn’t mesh well with Howard, the seventy year old Thatcherite, and Howard had little time for Obama’s free-spending stimulus plans. Mostly the two stayed out of each other’s way, although Howard did back Obama during his intervention in Libya.

Many expected things to get better when Miliband entered Buckingham, both Presidents were youngish Harvard alumni progressives with a passion for climate change. But Miliband’s dovish attitudes towards the Middle East darkened the relationship, withdrawing troops from Afghanistan and refusing to give British backing in Syria destroyed any hope of a Blair style close friendship.

Then came Donald.

Possibly one of the most fractious Head of State relations in British history, Trump’s climate denying misogyny rubbed Miliband up the wrong way, and Trump’s frequent attacks on Miliband’s close friend Sadiq Khan pushed Miliband over the edge. Miliband has vetoed every attempt at a Trump state visit, now Trump seems likely to be the first President in decades never to receive an invitation.

Trump has responded in kind by doing his best to take a wrecking ball to British politics. He has spent as much time with Elizabeth Windsor and Nigel Farage as he possibly can. He has endorsed every Miliband opponent under the sun, from Boris Johnson to Nigel Farage and he has called for Britain to leave the European Union. When he’s not chucking molotovs over the Atlantic, Trump takes to Twitter to call President Miliband a “stone cold loser”, not quite as effective as “crooked Hilary” but he clearly gets under Ed’s skin.

It is hard to tell what the future holds for the special relationship, I doubt it could survive another Trump Presidency, but Biden might not be much better, I don’t imagine Uncle Joe has forgotten the bad blood between Miliband and his former boss. Then again, Joe was always the dove of the Obama Whitehouse, and as climate change is looking to be a priority for a future Biden administration, maybe the special relationship can be salvaged.

- New Statesman, 2020
 
Epilogue: Parliamentary Diagrams May 2020 (Pt. 1)
Here are the Regional Parliaments directly after the May 2020 elections (AltHistory.com only lets you post a max of ten pictures so I've split into two pages)

South East England


1614701851466.png

Conservative Majority of 4

Government

  • Conservative Party (110)
Opposition
  • Liberal Democrats (30)
  • Labour Party (29)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (20)
  • Brexit Alliance (13)
  • UK Independence Party (9)
Greater London
1614702127997.png

Labour/Liberal Coalition Majority of 1

Government

  • Labour Party (77)
  • Liberal Democrats (23)
Opposition
  • Conservative (60)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (16)
  • Women's Equality Party (13)
  • Brexit Alliance (10)
North West England
1614702389113.png

Labour/Green Coalition (with confidence and supply from the Liberal Democrats) Majority of 8

Government

  • Labour Party (62)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (22)
Confidence and Supply
  • Liberal Democrats (10)
Opposition
  • Conservative Party (56)
  • Brexit Alliance (11)
  • Frank Field's Social Justice Party (10)
Anglia
1614702668267.png

Conservative Majority of 7

Government

  • Conservative Party (79)
Opposition
  • Labour Party (23)
  • Liberal Democrats (15)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (11)
  • Brexit Alliance (9)
  • UKIP (6)
West Midlands
1614702888091.png

Conservative/Liberal Democrat Coalition Majority of 9

Government

  • Conservative Party (68)
  • Liberal Democrats (10)
Opposition
  • Labour Party (35)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (10)
  • Brexit Alliance (8)
  • UKIP (6)
South West England
1614703053542.png

Conservative Majority of 2

Government

  • Conservative Party (67)
Opposition
  • Labour Party (21)
  • Liberal Democrats (19)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (12)
  • Brexit Alliance (8)
  • Mebyon Kernow (2)

 
Epilogue: Parliamentary Diagrams May 2020 (Pt. 2)
Yorkshire Parliament
1614703393710.png

Conservative/Brexit Alliance Coalition Majority of 1

Government

  • Conservative Party (54)
  • Brexit Alliance (11)
Opposition
  • Labour Party (38)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (9)
  • Yorkshire Party (9)
  • Liberal Democrats (8)
Scottish Parliament
1614703542849.png

SNP/Green Coalition Majority of 4

Government

  • Scottish National Party (63)
  • Scottish Greens (6)
Opposition
  • Scottish Conservatives (29)
  • Scottish Labour (17)
  • Scottish Liberal Democrats (8)
  • Brexit Alliance (6)
East Midlands Parliament
1614703708860.png

Conservative Majority of 1

Government

  • Conservative Party (57)
Opposition
  • Labour Party (26)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (8)
  • Liberal Democrats (8)
  • Brexit Alliance (7)
  • UKIP (5)
Welsh Parliament
1614704085963.png

Labour/Plaid/Green/Liberal Democrat Coalition Majority of 1

Government

  • Welsh Labour (21)
  • Plaid Cymru (8)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (5)
  • Welsh Liberal Democrats (5)
Opposition
  • Welsh Conservatives (23)
  • Brexit Alliance (6)
  • Abolish (4)
  • UKIP (3)

North East Parliament
1614703900383.png

Labour/Green/NEP/Liberal Democrat Coalition Majority of 1

Government

  • Labour Party (16)
  • Green Party of England and Wales (3)
  • North East Party (3)
  • Liberal Democrats (3)
Opposition
  • Conservative Party (17)
  • Brexit Alliance (5)
Northern Irish Parliament
1614704344900.png

DUP/APNI/Sinn Fein/SDLP/UUP Coalition Majority of 11

Government

  • Democratic Unionist Party (9)
  • Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (8)
  • Sinn Fein (6)
  • Social Democratic Labour Party (6)
  • Ulster Unionist Party (5)
Opposition
  • Aontu (5)
  • Traditional Unionist Voice (2)
  • Green Party of Northern Ireland (2)
  • People Before Profit (2)
 
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