What if Anne Boleyn died for her 1534 miscarriage, leaving Henry VIII as widower with only a small daughter as heiress? Here Henry VIII has NOT yet tired of Anne, and she was dead while Catherine was still alive meaning who Henry need to remarry quickly for a son and Elizabeth’s legitimacy can not be questioned (else that would mean who the wedding between Henry and Catherine WAS NOT annulled and Henry would NEVER go back on that, specially when he still need a legitimate son). Henry will most likely marry either another English noblewoman or a French proxy.
 
Tree
POD: Anne Boleyn died in summer 1534 for a miscarriage (WIP as always)

Henry VIII (1492-1556) married a) Catherine of Aragon (1485-1537) in 1509 annulled 1533 b) Anne Boleyn (1507-1534) in 1533, c) Mary of Bourbon (1515-1538) in 1535, d) Christina of Denmark (b. 1521) in 1539 had relationship with e) Elizabeth Blount and f) Jane Seymour
  1. a) stillborn daughter (1510)
  2. a) Henry, Duke of Cornwall (1511)
  3. a) stillborn son (1513)
  4. a) stillborn son (1515)
  5. a) lady Mary Tudor (b. 1516)
  6. e) Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond and Somerset (1519-1536) married Mary Howard (b. 1519) without issues
  7. b) Elizabeth of England (b. 1533) married John of Austria, King of Lorraine and Duke of Burgundy (b. 1534)* with issues
  8. b) miscarried son (1534)
  9. c) Margaret of England (1536-1546)
  10. f) Edward Fitzroy (1537-1541)
  11. c) Anne of England (b. 1537) married Philip II, King of Spain (b. 1527) as second wife with issues
  12. c) Eleanor of England (b. 1538) married James VI, King of Scotland (b. 1538)** with issues
  13. d) Henry, Prince of Wales (1541-1545)
  14. d) Edward, Duke of York (1542-1544)
  15. d) Charles I, King of England (b. 1544) married a) Eleanor of Lorraine (1543-1562)*** b) Anne of Austria (b. 1549)
    1. a) Eleanor, Duchess of Lorraine (b. 1461) married Charles I, King of Lorraine and Duke of Burgundy (b. 1552)****
    2. a) Henry, Prince of Wales (1562-1565)
    3. b) Edward VI, King of England (b. 1564) married Isabella of Spain (b. 1464)*****
    4. b) Christina (b. 1566) married Philip III, King of Spain (b. 1462)*****
    5. b) other issues
  16. d) Christine of England (b. 1546) married Charles IX, King of France (b. 1550) with issues

*fourth child and second surviving son of Charles V and Isabella of Portugal (in OTL he was stillborn)
** son and only child of James V and his first wife Madeleine of France, who died in childbirth.
*** eldest daughter of Francis I, Duke of Lorraine and Maria of Viseu.
**** son of John of Austria and Elizabeth Tudor
***** children of Charles I, King of Portugal (and Prince of Asturias and Girona) and Elisabeth of France


NOTES: with Anne Boleyn dying from her first miscarriage, and while Henry still loved her, Elizabeth‘s position as legitimate princess and her father’s heiress presumptive is secured. Henry in his quest for a son will remarry twice, first to a French proxy (as his choice of brides is pretty much restricted with Catherine still alive) and then to Charles V’s niece (who here will have little reluctance to become Henry VIII’s fourth Queen as after the annulment with Katherine, Henry‘s next wives died for a miscarriage and in childbirth). About the fact who between wives and mistresses he had 6 sons born alive and only the youngest lived, well I like tormenting Henry (and considering who he was basically a Catholic who do not recognized papal authority and Christina was Catholic, I would say who is petty safe who England will get back in the Catholic fold under Charles I, if not earlier)
 
I imagine Catherine has a “See I was right, right, RIGHT”, moment here?
Not really, unless she is still deluded about the Great Matter being Anne’s fault AND who Henry would return to her now. Elizabeth remaining legitimate while her daughter is considered illegitimate will torment her until her death…
 
Not really, unless she is still deluded about the Great Matter being Anne’s fault AND who Henry would return to her now. Elizabeth remaining legitimate while her daughter is considered illegitimate will torment her until her death…
I imagine initially she'd have a reaction like that, though as it becomes clear Henry VIII's not coming back she'd probably realise that Henry's over him.
 
I imagine initially she'd have a reaction like that, though as it becomes clear Henry VIII's not coming back she'd probably realise that Henry's over him.
Still Anne Boleyn’s pregnancy pattern was better than hers: a living, healthy and strong girl at the first try and the miscarriage who killed her was caused by the fact who her second pregnancy was too early after Elizabeth‘s birth so she had little to be happy
 
Henry VIII’s great love: Anne Boleyn, Queen of England
Anne Boleyn was without doubt the great love of Henry VIII’s life as the King arrived at the point to break with the Pope and the Catholic Church (relationship fully repaired only in the years of Henry’s last wedding to Christine of Denmark) for being able to marry her and would never truly stop to mourn her early death in childbirth, lamenting the cruel fate who had taken away from him his beloved Anne and their son who had not the chance to live. During his third wedding to the French noblewoman Mary of Bourbon, King Henry was highly suspicious of the Spanish Ambassador Eustace Chapuys, a note partisan of Henry’s former wife Catherine of Aragon and their daughter lady Mary, as the King suspected who his beloved and their son died because Queen Anne was poisoned by Catherine’s supporters. Anne had not be popular in England during the years of Henry’s courting of her or during her short Queenship, but her tragic fate and the great number of schools opened in her name and memory by king Henry after her death, would made her remembered as the Good Queen Anne, who had given to the Englishmen their Bible, secular education and had given birth to the popular, cultured and exceptionally talented Princess Elizabeth, who would become Queen of Lorraine and Duchess of Burgundy marrying Emperor Charles V’s younger son, John of Austria who would be a close ally of his cousin and brother-in-law Charles I of England.
 
If he repaired his relationship to the church with his marriage to Christina, wouldn't it stand to reason Mary would be legitimized at some point for being born out of a "good faith" marriage? Well, assuming father and daughter haven't burnt down all their bridges.
 
If he repaired his relationship to the church with his marriage to Christina, wouldn't it stand to reason Mary would be legitimized at some point for being born out of a "good faith" marriage? Well, assuming father and daughter haven't burnt down all their bridges.
No, as Henry would not be willing to reconsider his decision about that and in any case the relationship between Henry and Mary was already too damaged and Mary had lost all her partisans well before this point…

If the tree alone do not make it clear enough, Charles V himself is the last person who would be favorable to restoring Mary’s legitimacy as his second son will be engaged to Elizabeth Tudor as soon Catherine die so he has no interest in Elizaebth’s legitimacy being put in doubt or Mary being reinstated in the succession ahead of her half-sisters as that would lessen his John’s chances to inherit England (and Elizabeth was at worst third in line until 1564, who is well after her father-in-law’s death)

Sounds like Anne has a far better fate ITTL. I approve.
Yes, she had a better fate and the same is true for Elizabeth.
 
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Henry VIII’s last Queen: Christina of Denmark (part 1)
Christina of Denmark was daughter of a deposed King, who lost his crown when she was very young, and that would surely not promise well for her future wedding, if her mother had not been the sister of Emperor Charles V, the most powerful King of Europe, and that mean who both she and her elder sister Dorothea would be matrimonial pawn for their uncle (but the same happened also to their cousin Maria of Viseu, whose half-brother was fine with Charles arranging her wedding). Christina was barely twelve years old when she was married to the much older and ill Duke of Milan becoming widowed two years later, at only fourteen years old, without consummating the d wedding. In 1537 the sixteen years old Christina left Milan for returning in the Netherlands, at the court of her aunt Mary, who was regent there, waiting for the Emperor‘s decision about her remarriage. Just a couple of moths after her arrival in Brussels, arrived the news who the English Queen, Mary of Bourbon, had died in childbirth, leaving King Henry VIII with just four legitimate daughters, and that was a good news for Charles V as his second son John, who was the heir of Netherlands was engaged to Henry‘s eldest daughter, princess Elizabeth, while the late Queen had been French. Naturally King Henry would need to remarry for trying to get a male heir, and tht mean who the Emperor needed to offer him one of his relatives as new bride, so Charles V sent his ambassador to offer condolences to the English King together with the proposal of marry one of his young nieces, either Maria of Viseu or Christina of Denmark, both sixteen years old. The Portuguese princess had a much larger dowry, being one of the richest princesses of Europe, and was a beautiful, smart and kind lady, but Christina was absolutely stunning and so King Henry choose her. Christina had not be exactly happy for the match as Henry was some years older than her first husband, and two of his wives had died in childbirth and that without talking of the treatment who the King had reserved to his first wife (Catherine of Aragon, who was Christina’s great-aunt), after she refuted to accept an annulment of their wedding or the one who the King had reserved to Mary, the daughter who he had by said wife, who refuted to accept the invalidity of her parents marriage, and now was reduced at the status of illegitimate and forced to be a lady-in-waiting of princess Elizabeth. Still Charles, as soon his Aunt died and he was able to secure the hand of Henry’s heiress presumptive for his second son, had dropped any support for his unlucky cousin, and Christina knew well who her uncle was the only ruler who disliked disobedience and disloyalty, whatever it was true or only perceived, more than her husband to be, so she accepted the match without any complaint. After all she was to marry a King, while Maria of Viseu would need to content herself with the Duke of Lorraine, whose land were strategically placed between France, Burgundy and Imperial lands and so was reputed worth of a royal bride by the Emperor.
 
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I'm sure Christina is quite pleased with how things turn out for her in the end, as I imagine that Henry gives her pride of place among his wives ITTL since she is the one who finally gives him a surviving, legitimate son.
 
I'm sure Christina is quite pleased with how things turn out for her in the end, as I imagine that Henry gives her pride of place among his wives ITTL since she is the one who finally gives him a surviving, legitimate son.
Sort of. They would still be married only six years and their two eldest son will die young, but yes she will not be Anne, who here remained Henry’s great love, but will be close to her in Henry‘s heart. Still she will be very pleased to discover who Henry had named as regent for their son in his testament
 
Oh - that is unexpected but nice. Is there a council appointed to rule alongside her or anything?
There is a Council, but Christina will be head of it. Charles V will feel to have hit the jackpot with both Christina and Maria as regents for their sons
 
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