In the east, some equivalent of the Kievan Rus’ with a Varangian ruling class could be conceivably brought into the faith, though it would be heavily syncretized with Slavic paganism. More generally, it will be interesting to see how this religion interacts with pagans in places such as Poland and Lithuania, as well as the Hungarian raiders of Europe, who did not convert to Christianity until they settled down
Yeah, this could be extremely interesting, basically everything East of Francia and North of Italy could potentially be converted. With the Muslims invading in the South, I could see a lot of recently-converted Christians to abandon the faith for this old-new alternative. Especially if a Charlemagne-like figure arises somehow.
 
So it seems like the aim here is a more organised and unified Norse tradition that also absorbs/syncretises Finno-Urgic traditions as well. This is interesting, because it puts the Norse faith on a much stronger footing down the line and if it works, it will be a more than viable alternative to Christianity when it eventually comes knocking, one rooted in ethnic traditions that will be much harder to Christianity to overcome.
Honestly one of the more interesting aspect is that Norse begins to write book, while the Norse seems have had a high runic literacy, they don’t seem to have a real written tradition. Here we see a rise of a written tradition as , which will radical change Norse society.

I mean it's more likely that a unified Norse people would just assimilated the demographically weaker Finns, just like the Arabs assimilated South Arabians and many other Arab-like peoples around them. I don't think having Finnic influence in the religion would significantly change things.
Honestly that would be interesting in itself, if the Norse expand east into the Northern Volga basin and assimilating the local Finnic group before the East Slavs do so.

But a thing I was thinking, this Norse sect have mostly been active in the eastern frontier of the Norse, the interesting part will be when it hit the Norse population centers like Denmark and also Saxony, we may not think of the Saxony as Norse today, but pre-Frankish conquest the Saxons and Frisians was very much part of the extended Norse world. @TongaTui also in his last post set up some interesting implication with the whole faithful versus unfaithful. He’s fundamental creating a new unifying ethno-religious identity for the Norse and likely also a common law for all Norse. Such a common identity being spread will lead to lower infighting which would lead to internal development and will allow the Norse to expand unified outward, resulting in a early “Viking Era”. We know there was failed Swedish/Geotish conquest attempt of the northern Baltic states, a more unified Norse group would likely do better. The Danish overlordship of the northern Wendish states was pretty much only based on vassal relationships, here we may see the Danes set up a stronger control over their Wendish vassals.

In OTL Norse major settlement was also usual established in rather protected positions mostly to avoid internal raiding between Norse groups and attack by other sea raiding groups. A stronger unified Norse would be able to make major settlement in strategic important but vulnerable positions.
 
Honestly that would be interesting in itself, if the Norse expand east into the Northern Volga basin and assimilating the local Finnic group before the East Slavs do so.
That's a bit radical, but at the very least Norse could be more direct participants of the Finnic colonization of the areas around lake Ladoga, AFAIK Baltic FInnic groups such as the Vots and Veps were being created during this period, around 700 CE Baltic Finns were still confined to Southern Finland, Estonia, Ingria and Northern Latvia:


But a thing I was thinking, this Norse sect have mostly been active in the eastern frontier of the Norse, the interesting part will be when it hit the Norse population centers like Denmark and also Saxony, we may not think of the Saxony as Norse today, but pre-Frankish conquest the Saxons and Frisians was very much part of the extended Norse world. @TongaTui also in his last post set up some interesting implication with the whole faithful versus unfaithful. He’s fundamental creating a new unifying ethno-religious identity for the Norse and likely also a common law for all Norse. Such a common identity being spread will lead to lower infighting which would lead to internal development and will allow the Norse to expand unified outward, resulting in a early “Viking Era”. We know there was failed Swedish/Geotish conquest attempt of the northern Baltic states, a more unified Norse group would likely do better. The Danish overlordship of the northern Wendish states was pretty much only based on vassal relationships, here we may see the Danes set up a stronger control over their Wendish vassals.
If this religion is as solid and dominating as Islam is I'd say even places like Scotland and England can be converted at some point in time, although to be honest it's a bit harder given Christianity has already been entrenched there. I guess we could see in the mean time a Germanic world divided between the one in the Frankish-Catholic sphere(England, Southern Netherlands, Alemannia, Franconia and Bavaria) and one in the north Sea/Baltic sphere(Scandinavia, Saxony, Frisia)
 
At the end of the day, though, even if this religion is nominally open to convert, I do not see how much attraction it would hold for regions outside of Norse rule that are not more heavily Christianized. In fact, a case could be made that, rather than a Northern European Islam, this would be more of a Northern European Hinduism, in that it is a codified, organizer version of the tradition Indo-European religion of the continent capable of holding its own with Abrahamic religions.
Interesting that you see it as more Northern European Hinduism. From my perspective, the new Norse faith seems to echo both Islam and, surprisingly enough, Ancient Egyptian religion. The adherence to the faith even in marriages and children evokes Islamic precepts regarding family (though this is also played with Christianity, especially with the water sprinkling) while the divisions of the soul into 3 parts is weirdly reminiscent of Ancient Egypt's belief in the components of the soul (Heart, Personality, Shadow, Vital Spark, and your Name).

Though the Óðr faith isn't in any way connected to these two religions, the parallels and mix of systems is interesting to note.
 
Interesting that you see it as more Northern European Hinduism. From my perspective, the new Norse faith seems to echo both Islam and, surprisingly enough, Ancient Egyptian religion. The adherence to the faith even in marriages and children evokes Islamic precepts regarding family (though this is also played with Christianity, especially with the water sprinkling) while the divisions of the soul into 3 parts is weirdly reminiscent of Ancient Egypt's belief in the components of the soul (Heart, Personality, Shadow, Vital Spark, and your Name).

Though the Óðr faith isn't in any way connected to these two religions, the parallels and mix of systems is interesting to note.
The soul thing is inspired by Finnish Paganism. The Fins are the real Egyptians you see :winkytongue:
 
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I'm glad the concept is being well received though now I'm getting nervous with the writing. I need to do more research as things begin to get more complex beyond a single man and his followers.
 
I'm glad the concept is being well received though now I'm getting nervous with the writing. I need to do more research as things begin to get more complex beyond a single man and his followers.
I think this is one of the most interesting attempt to create a codified version of Norse Mythology. A few thought, I think you should think about what these people will write on. I suspect like the early Christian East Slavs, they will use birchbark in the daily use, and then parchment for writing which had to survive longer. Early on parchment will likely be bought from the Franks and British, but we will see a shift to the Norse producing it themselves. This creates both a new group of craftmen, a new products and the new profession of scribe/chronicler. I could see scribes being a major way for the faith to spread and gain prestige, while the chieftain of Gotland may not have a great need of these, the petty kings of the more densely populated Svealand, Eastern Norway, Denmark and Saxony would likely see a much greater use in getting access to scribes/chronicles without having to import Christian monks. This would of course make the faithful into some kind of Norse monastic order, but that would put them in a good position to gain land, establish communities and spread their beliefs.

Another aspect I could see would be the birth of runic cursive, if we saw a shift from carved to written runic (example below)
1597098080098.jpeg


I could also in a world where Gotland serve as where a common Nordic identity being created, see the Norse/Nordic/Scandinavian simply calling themselves and be called Goths.
 
I can’t wait to see how the Norse deities actually fit into this cosmology of Odrism. Odin has already been mentioned as well as the dualistic concept of the Æsir and Vanir, can it retain a polytheistic flavor while remaining distinctly structured?
 
I can’t wait to see how the Norse deities actually fit into this cosmology of Odrism. Odin has already been mentioned as well as the dualistic concept of the Æsir and Vanir, can it retain a polytheistic flavor while remaining distinctly structured?
We have had visions of Skaði, the goddess of winter. All in all, I don't see why structure/organisation requires monotheism. Odin served a specific purpose, not only as the chieftain of the Aesir, but also as a god of wisdom, learning, poetry, war, and as a trickster (not quite as much as Loki, say, but he was often known as a trickster of sorts).
 
We have had visions of Skaði, the goddess of winter. All in all, I don't see why structure/organisation requires monotheism. Odin served a specific purpose, not only as the chieftain of the Aesir, but also as a god of wisdom, learning, poetry, war, and as a trickster (not quite as much as Loki, say, but he was often known as a trickster of sorts).
You’re right, I guess in my mind I was drawing a parallel between the Zoroastrian yazatas and what could become of the Norse deities.
 
intriguing idea ... as others have said, it does have a faint smell of reimagined Hinduism (... which i guess isn't too surprising since they're both arguably descended from a Proto-Indo-European polytheistic religion).

But yeah, the two biggest factors is less internal fighting among the Norse, (when the Óðr denomination achieves regional supremacy), and a much earlier and stronger written tradition, with Elder Futhark evolving into a alphabet that's practical to write on paper, paving the way to a new class of scribes and advanced bureaucracy. Possibly with the Elder Futhark staying around being used for more casual 'ad-hoc' writing such as marks of ownership on items, and runestones, might even to a degree where Literary Futhark and Common Futhark are considered semi-seperate alphabets, in much the same way as Japanese have Katagana and Hiragana
 
But yeah, the two biggest factors is less internal fighting among the Norse, (when the Óðr denomination achieves regional supremacy), and a much earlier and stronger written tradition, with Elder Futhark evolving into a alphabet that's practical to write on paper, paving the way to a new class of scribes and advanced bureaucracy. Possibly with the Elder Futhark staying around being used for more casual 'ad-hoc' writing such as marks of ownership on items, and runestones, might even to a degree where Literary Futhark and Common Futhark are considered semi-seperate alphabets, in much the same way as Japanese have Katagana and Hiragana
Two separate alphabets would make sense. Elder Futhark was more than just a writing system, after all; the Norse used it to invoke the gods themselves through spells. If that remains religiously significant then it's likely that the written language for common bureaucracy deviates from it into something less spiritually significant.
 
As part of my Ingwin religion muses here's my take on the different Anglian futhorc and it's change to a differentiated and cursive form.
Note that the Ing rune is separate.
IMG_20200812_190520_20200812190817934.jpg
 
intriguing idea ... as others have said, it does have a faint smell of reimagined Hinduism (... which i guess isn't too surprising since they're both arguably descended from a Proto-Indo-European polytheistic religion).

But yeah, the two biggest factors is less internal fighting among the Norse, (when the Óðr denomination achieves regional supremacy), and a much earlier and stronger written tradition, with Elder Futhark evolving into a alphabet that's practical to write on paper, paving the way to a new class of scribes and advanced bureaucracy. Possibly with the Elder Futhark staying around being used for more casual 'ad-hoc' writing such as marks of ownership on items, and runestones, might even to a degree where Literary Futhark and Common Futhark are considered semi-seperate alphabets, in much the same way as Japanese have Katagana and Hiragana
The better example may be the different fonts of Georgian. Hiragana and katakana, at least in the modern usage, can belong in the same sentence and have different roles within it. However, while most modern Georgian writing and print is in the Mkhedruli font, the Asomtavruli font remains as a kind of inscriptional type.

Mkhedruli is descended from Asomtavruli, and differs in being more cursive and rounded. So the Cursive Runic becomes a kind of everyday writing, while the Angular Runic preserves the auspicious original shapes and religious significance.
 
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