Proposals and War Aims That Didn't Happen Map Thread

View attachment 572838

Divided Japan after a successful Downfall with the Soviets occupying North Japan and parts of Tokyo.
The problem with it is that "East Tokyo" is neither the eastern half of Tokyo, nor part of Tokyo proper. What we normally call Tokyo (the city) is the 23 Special Wards, which are all in "West" Tokyo.

In fact, "East Tokyo" contains just the following:
Machida
Hachioji
Akiruno
Fussa
Hamura
Ome
Nishi-Tama
Which in total constitutes just 1.4 million out of 13.5 million people in OTL 2016 Tokyo-do.

I don't think "East Tokyo" could be viable in any way. Not with that name.
 
Was this an actual proposal? Or are you just applying the Berlin Wall logic to Japan?

Soviet Proposal for Allied Occupation Zones in Japan
Red = Soviet Union
Dark Blue = United States
Green = United States and China
Orange = China
Light Blue = United Kingdom
Gold = United States, Soviet Union, United Kingdom, and China
North Japan looks broadly correct, but that divided Tokyo doesn't cover the proposed occupation zone.
 
View attachment 572838

Divided Japan after a successful Downfall with the Soviets occupying North Japan and parts of Tokyo.
Poor North Japan...

In the late 1920's and early 1930's, Communist Party of the United States member Harry Haywood proposed his own version of a independent African-American nation. According to Ibid, "The document was written by John Pepper under the title “American Negro Problems.” The article was published in the October 1928 issue of The Communist, and called for a Negro Soviet Republic within the United States." Totentanz0 mentions this in his Soviet Union plans document. Here is a map of what this country would look like:
View attachment 572270
So what happaned to Florida?
 
I wonder how things would be if Williamsburg became the American capital. At the least it'd be an interesting string of continuity to Jamestown - the first Anglo-American city and its direct successor now the capital of the Colossus of North America.
 
1597534484057.png

Between Vancouver Island and Washington State, there's an archipelago called the San Juan Islands, which both America and the UK claimed. The Oregon Treaty of June 15, 1846, tried to resolve the situation by saying "You get one half and you get the other" However, complicated natural boundaries and disagreements really made it hard to decide what qualified as "half"

This basically created a weird legal limbo where America and the UK both had sovereignty over the islands at the same time. Basically, you had a few dozen American farmers and a sheep farm run by the British Hudson's Bay Company.

On June 15, 1859, exactly 13 years after the adoption of the Oregon Treaty, an American farmer named Lyman Cutlar found a black pig rooting around in his potatos, so he took his gun and killed it. Said pig belonged to an Irish Hudson's Bay Company employee, who had several pigs he let roam freely, and wanted compensation. Cutlar offered $10 (equivalent to $280 in 2019), but the employee, Charles Griffin, wanted at least $100 ($2,800). Cutlar refused, and at least one anecdotal account suggests their argument went something like this:
Cutlar: Keep your pigs out of my potatoes
Griffin: Keep your potatoes out of my pigs

When British authorities moved to arrest Cutlar, the settlers called for American military support. Brigadier-General William S. Harney moved his force in to occupy the island on July 27th, and by August 10th, 461 Americans with 14 cannons under Colonel Silas Casey were opposed by five British warships mounting 70 guns and carrying 2,140 men

The governor of the Colony of Vancouver Island, James Douglas, ordered British Rear Admiral Robert L. Baynes to land marines on San Juan Island and engage the American soldiers, but Baynes refused, rightfully saying that "two great nations in a war over a squabble about a pig" was foolish. The men on both sides spent days trading insults, trying to goad the other side into shooting first, but those were the only shots that were fired.

The Pig War of 1859 ended that October without any bloodshed.
 
View attachment 575579
Between Vancouver Island and Washington State, there's an archipelago called the San Juan Islands, which both America and the UK claimed. The Oregon Treaty of June 15, 1846, tried to resolve the situation by saying "You get one half and you get the other" However, complicated natural boundaries and disagreements really made it hard to decide what qualified as "half"

This basically created a weird legal limbo where America and the UK both had sovereignty over the islands at the same time. Basically, you had a few dozen American farmers and a sheep farm run by the British Hudson's Bay Company.

On June 15, 1859, exactly 13 years after the adoption of the Oregon Treaty, an American farmer named Lyman Cutlar found a black pig rooting around in his potatos, so he took his gun and killed it. Said pig belonged to an Irish Hudson's Bay Company employee, who had several pigs he let roam freely, and wanted compensation. Cutlar offered $10 (equivalent to $280 in 2019), but the employee, Charles Griffin, wanted at least $100 ($2,800). Cutlar refused, and at least one anecdotal account suggests their argument went something like this:
Cutlar: Keep your pigs out of my potatoes
Griffin: Keep your potatoes out of my pigs

When British authorities moved to arrest Cutlar, the settlers called for American military support. Brigadier-General William S. Harney moved his force in to occupy the island on July 27th, and by August 10th, 461 Americans with 14 cannons under Colonel Silas Casey were opposed by five British warships mounting 70 guns and carrying 2,140 men

The governor of the Colony of Vancouver Island, James Douglas, ordered British Rear Admiral Robert L. Baynes to land marines on San Juan Island and engage the American soldiers, but Baynes refused, rightfully saying that "two great nations in a war over a squabble about a pig" was foolish. The men on both sides spent days trading insults, trying to goad the other side into shooting first, but those were the only shots that were fired.

The Pig War of 1859 ended that October without any bloodshed.
Except for the pig ;)
 
Tokyo is under joint occupation (gold), so I think the presumption was that like Berlin it would see the non-Soviet parts combine.
I understood that.
However, as another user said:
The problem with it is that "East Tokyo" is neither the eastern half of Tokyo, nor part of Tokyo proper.
And from the map I posted, none of "East Tokyo" is part of the joint occupation zone (which looks to only cover Tokyo City).
 
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