President Sherman?

There were calls for Sherman to run for President after the Civil War; he resisted but WI he'd run in 1868 instead of Grant?
 
First, why would he? It would be incredibly out of character for Sherman. He saw himself as a soldier: he had no political ambitions and had no interest in using his fame for a nice civilian position. Moreover, William T. Sherman absolutely hated politicians and politics. Given Sherman’s temperament, there was no way he could establish a working relationship with politicians.

Second, why would Sherman be replacing Grant? Sherman’s beliefs were vastly different from the Republican Party and in fact, his relationship with Grant cooled over disagreements in politics. Sherman was very much in favor of letting the South have an easy peace. He thought when the war had ended, the U.S. army would go to guard the frontier or border instead of its police role in the South. Sherman was also really opposed to black-white equality. He accepted that the slaves were free, but did not want them to have voting rights. His foster father, Thomas Ewing, shared the same thoughts and was a key advisor for Andrew Johnson. Sherman seemed pretty favorable to Johnson’s Reconstruction, which would have pitted him against the Republicans.
 
I mean, there is a reason that one is someone flat out refuses to be nominated by a party for an election, it is called a Shermanesque Statement.

"I will not accept if nominated and will not serve if elected." --William T. Sherman, if reference to being approached to make an presidential run in 1884.
 
if memory serves me correctly, John Sherman attempted in 1876 to position himself as the Republican candidate but failed to gather enough supporters at the convention.
 
if memory serves me correctly, John Sherman attempted in 1876 to position himself as the Republican candidate but failed to gather enough supporters at the convention.
I believe this occured in 1880 when Sherman lost to James Garfield. I cannot recall if he was a candidate in 1876.
 
The convention where John Sherman had the best chance was probably 1888--he actually led on the first six ballots. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1888_Republican_National_Convention

He would most likely have won in November, too. He might have lost the 15 electoral votes of IN, where Harrison had a home-state advantage--but that would still leave him with a 218-183 lead in the Electoral College. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1888_United_States_presidential_election

There is no reason to think Sherman would have lost Harrison's second-narrowest state in 1888--New York. Cleveland had only carried New York very narrowly even in 1884, and he had a whole lot of disadvantages in 1888 he didn't have in 1884: Conkling, who had helped to "knife" Blaine in 1884, was dead; Sherman (like Harrison) was less vulnerable than Blaine had been on the "character" issue; there was no "rum, Romanism, and rebellion" gaffe in 1888; and Cleveland's stance in favor of lower tariffs may have hurt him with industrial workers and specifically his stance in favor of placing wool on the free list,hurt him with a lot of Upstate sheep farmers.
 
The convention where John Sherman had the best chance was probably 1888--he actually led on the first six ballots. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1888_Republican_National_Convention

He would most likely have won in November, too. He might have lost the 15 electoral votes of IN, where Harrison had a home-state advantage--but that would still leave him with a 218-183 lead in the Electoral College. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1888_United_States_presidential_election

There is no reason to think Sherman would have lost Harrison's second-narrowest state in 1888--New York. Cleveland had only carried New York very narrowly even in 1884, and he had a whole lot of disadvantages in 1888 he didn't have in 1884: Conkling, who had helped to "knife" Blaine in 1884, was dead; Sherman (like Harrison) was less vulnerable than Blaine had been on the "character" issue; there was no "rum, Romanism, and rebellion" gaffe in 1888; and Cleveland's stance in favor of lower tariffs may have hurt him with industrial workers and specifically his stance in favor of placing wool on the free list,hurt him with a lot of Upstate sheep farmers.

So (assuming Cleveland still comes back in 1892) we could get Harrison in 1896 instead of McKinley - and perhaps McKinley later?
 
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