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Chapter I
This is the first official post of my new TM, formerly known as A Prussian Blitz. The premise is that a certain Prussian prince has a different personality than OTL.

People who have shown interest:
@Zagan @SkylineDreamer

People who helped draft this TL:
@Gukpard

Prologue (November 1801):

As Friedrich Wilhelm III walks to the royal bedchamber, he accidentally trips on an applecore carelessly left by a servant. Nine months later his wife gives birth to Karl Hohenzollern*.



29 years later…

It came first to France**. On 25 July 1830, King Charles X of France signed the “July Ordinances”, suspending the liberty of the press and restricting voter rights. In response, revolution broke out in Paris, with the revolutionaries seizing control of the city on 29 July after "Three Glorious Days" of fighting. Forced to admit defeat, Charles abdicated on 2 August. He was succeeded by his distant cousin, Louis-Philippe of the House of Orléans, who agreed to rule as a constitutional monarch.


Revolution soon spread. On August 25 riots broke out in Brussels, and soon all of Belgium was in revolt against the Netherlands. The Dutch sent their army in, but Belgian soldiers in it defected en masse. When they tried to call a council of Great Powers, they found that world opinion was with the Belgians. Exasperated, the Dutch invaded Belgium anyways, but their efforts would be doomed.


In Germany and Switzerland, the people, inspired by the French and Belgian examples, rose up. Quickly many small countries in Germany granted constitutions. Of course, for Switzerland this is hardly unique. As one historian has put it; “It has become the custom of the Swiss to have a civil war every few decades. It remains a mystery why everyone continues to be surprised by them.”


But what would turn out to be the most significant revolution was yet to come.


On the morning of August 26 Frederick William III, 60 years old and still King of Prussia, was woken up abruptly by an aide.

“Your highness, there is something you must see. Come, follow me.”

Reluctantly Frederick William rose from bed and followed the aide. He was led to the front door of the Charlottenburg Palace, where a shocking sight awaited him.

A massive crowd had formed. They waved Prussian flags, which impressed him, and those atrocious German tricolours, which certainly did not. But they also waved a third flag, a strange one which he had not seen before.

No, that would be a lie. He had. It was a new flag for Prussia, a blue-and-white tricolour with an eagle. It was almost as atrocious as that German tricolour.

With a sense of foreboding Frederick William realized that he was the centre of attention. Everyone was waiting for him. He swallowed nervously, and then began to speak.

“You have gathered here today before my palace for a purpose. Who here can explain it to me?”

A businessman spoke up. “Your royal highness, Frederick William, King of Prussia, we have a list of requests to make to you.”

He pulled out a list and began to read.

“First. We ask that a constitution be chosen and put in place in Prussia.”

“Second. We ask that all citizens of Prussia be given an equal say in how the House of Representatives is elected.”

“And Third. We must request that you step down in favour of your son Karl.”

Karl, Frederick William thought. Karl. He had unnerving liberal sympathies, for one. And furthermore, in 1806, during the Napoleonic Wars, his tutor had convinced him to spend far less less on the Army than he thought necessary. And thus Prussia had been destroyed completely by France.

His advisors said that it was inevitable, that France would have defeated Prussia even if he had diverted funding to the army as planned. They said that by not overspending, he had saved Prussia from enormous debts which might still not be payed off.

Frederick William did not care. He would never abdicate in favour of Karl, the weakling. He must wait. Wait for the Army. Yes, wait for the Army. The Army would save him.


Provisional Headquarters of the Prussian Army (Poznan):

“Yes, but the initiative is ours. We must use it. Now.” said Clausewitz.

For some time the general staff had been arguing over what they should do. The cautious faction, led by Prince Karl*** advocated regrouping the army, which had fled from Berlin and Potsdam after being defeated in street fighting. The aggressive faction, led by the ageing Karl von Clausewitz, pressed for immediately sending in units as they became available.

“We cannot strike now. The Army is disorganized. It will be routed if sent piecemeal into battle”

“But you do not realize, there will be no battle. These are civilians. They will flee at the first sight of blue columns.”


Prince Karl, for his part knew nothing of the people’s wishes to install him as King, but did harbour sympathies for the their cause, which was part of the reason he resisted crushing it immediately.

Ultimately, the OKH meeting achieved very little. It was dismissed in the evening and both sides retired to their homes in disgust.


Next morning, on the capital of Prussia a new day rose as the sun could be seen in the grey streets of Berlin. Children played, soldiers marched, gentleman drank in their pubs and workingmen went to the factories.

At the same time, a crowd gathered around the Charlottenburg palace, it began a small group but later it was joined by more and more people until it reached the thousands, from this time on they began to protest again.

This time the old King was expecting them. Upon hearing the calls he came to the front door once more. His ears seemed to strain for the sound of gunshots, the tramp of disciplined boots, the yells of surprised people. But nothing came. After an eternal silence, he spoke.

“I, Frederick William King of Prussia, agree to the requests of the people of Berlin and Potsdam.”

The crows erupted in cheers. People congratulated each other. An amateur band played the national anthem. And a businessman - damn it the same one from yesterday - came up and shook his hand.

“Thank you for your gifts to the people of Prussia. You shall always be remembered as the kind King who stepped down when it was time.”

Frederick William did not reply, but merely smiled and nodded. He had made a monumental decision. He had sold Prussia to the liberals. He hoped they would take care of it.


Before the day was over the former King and Louise had arranged for them to travel to England, where they could buy a residence and live out the rest of their lives in happiness. On December 16 he and Louise left Prussia. Frederick William gazed longingly at his former kingdom until it slipped from sight. He would never see it again.

When Karl heard that the King had after all abdicated on the request of the people, he was surprised. So his plan had not been destined to work. He felt ashamed that he had helped to weaken his country, even accidentally. But this thought was quickly washed out when he was told that he had inherited the throne of Prussia. Karl could not believe it. He asked if he had heard correctly. And he had.


This was truly a unique year. But before it could draw to a close, another shocking thing happened.


On November 29, in response to Imperator**** Nicholas I’s announcement that he would use the Polish army to intervene in Belgium, Polish cadets seized control of the arsenal in Warsaw. In the face of the revolution, Grand Duke Constantine, the brother of Nicholas I and the governor of Poland, a retreated with his army to Russia and the Polish government declared Poland's independence.


Karl had always admired the Poles for their courage. As a teenager he had heard stories of their bravery. Poles had fought courageously in the Napoleonic Wars.Did they not deserve a country for their effort? And was this not the perfect chance to liberate Poland and also destroy one of the primary opponents of reform?

Thus on January 6 the leader of the Polish revolution, Józef Chłopicki, found himself with a most unexpected guest.

“And here I stood thinking to of resigning” he said in poor but understandable German.

Karl chuckled. “Yesterday that may indeed have been your best option. But now it is different. Your funding difficulties?”

Karl snapped his fingers.

“Gone. And now you the Prussian army at your side”.

Chłopicki bowed. “What I done to earn this favor?”

“You belong to Poland. I have always admired your country and its people. For ehat they kose in discipline they get back in sheer determination. Once a Pole has set his mind to something, he cannot be shaken.”


This development did not go unnoticed throughout Europe. Indeed, it sent shockwaves throughout the world. One of the most diehard reactionary states now had a liberal king in charge, and he was supporting a foreign revolution. What next? London newspapers had carried the headline “A New Monarch For Prussia” in September. Now they carried the line “Prussia’s New Regime Backs Poland”. And essays were being published about what this all entailed.



The Kingdom of Prussia in 1830


And a Russian diplomat replied to his government on December 23 with the answer to a very important question to a another foreign leader. “Metternich has answered” he said. “Metternich has answered yes”.

Footnotes:

* This person existed OTL, I have simply changed his personality.

** To be clear, this wave of revolutions hapoened OTL. I'm just adding to it.

*** Yes, the one the TL focuses on.

**** The actual title of the Russian monarchs from Peter the Great onwards.
 
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I like it, a more liberal prussia can be an interesting point of divergence.

Karl, Frederick William thought. Karl. He had unnerving liberal sympathies, for one. And furthermore, in 1806, during the Napoleonic Wars, Karl had convinced him to spend far less less on the Army than he thought necessary. And thus Prussia had been destroyed completely by France.
Karl was only five when this happend, maybe change it to a different person.
 
@Admiral A. Kolchak the problem with changing the date would be the age of the father. I saw you changed it to 1789, the father would be 9 at the time.
Maybe one of Karls teachers was an advicer to the King that talked him out of the spending.
 
I feel like a more liberal Prussia has the potential to become the most liberal nation in Europe. On the other hand, I always imagined Poland as a force for conservatism; how will that divide work out? Also, what about tensions over Posen and Danzig?
 
I feel like a more liberal Prussia has the potential to become the most liberal nation in Europe. On the other hand, I always imagined Poland as a force for conservatism; how will that divide work out? Also, what about tensions over Posen and Danzig?
OTL Poland was pretty happy to accept suport from anybody who gave it some. I don't know much about the politics of Polish indepdence movements. I assumed that since they allied with Revolutionary France a liberal Prussia would support them.
 
I can't understand. First, king Frederick William III was 60 years old in 1830, second this prince Karl is fictional or is he Prince Charles of Prussia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Charles_of_Prussia) with a mistaken birthdate? Third, even if king Frederick William III abdicated, before this Karl in the succesion line were the OTL kings Frederick William IV and Wilhelm I. Fourth, what different to OTL led the Russians to retreat from Poland?
 
I can't understand. First, king Frederick William III was 60 years old in 1830
Will be fixed. Sorry for all of the stupid errors.
second this prince Karl is fictional or is he Prince Charles of Prussia (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Charles_of_Prussia) with a mistaken birthdate?
This is mentioned in the footnotes, and in the beginning of the OP. He is that real person, but I changed his personaility.
Third, even if king Frederick William III abdicated, before this Karl in the succesion line were the OTL kings Frederick William IV and Wilhelm I.
When Charles X conceded to similar demands the monarch who replaced him wasn't in the line of succession. I assumed the same thing happened in Prussia.
Fourth, what different to OTL led the Russians to retreat from Poland?
That's how it played out OTL.
 
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