Pop Culture Oneshot Scenarios

Would make more sense in the 60s, the cloud post missile crisis would justify a lot of amoral experiments to get advantage over the soviets
I say the 50s because the 50s were the main nostalgic decade in the 80s like how the 80s were for the late 2000s and 2010s (if that makes sense).
 
Some ideas based on the Sillof Star Wars sets, but based on the newer Star Wars TV Shows:

-The Mandalorian as a Samurai film set during the early Meiji period or just slightly before.

-Bad Batch, but it's set during and after the Russian Revolution/Civil War

-The Star Wars Sequel Trilogy, but it's in a post-apocalyptic setting

-Kenobi as a Samurai series

-Star Wars the Clone Wars but it's a Japanese series in an original setting

-Star Wars Rebels but it's a 19th century steampunk version of the American Revolution (Inspired by the Revolt series)

That's all I got for now.
 
Looking back to that previous idea: What if Stranger Things were based on the 1950s (and early 60s) rather than the 1980s? What media would it take from? I Imagine some aliens or atomic horrors, likely the latter.

This is also assuming it's made in the present day rather than the 80s, as suggested before.

Other idea: Stranger Things set in the 20s or even the 1900s (that period before WW1, not the century), in terms of romanticized decades/eras.
 
An idea based on the German Book/Movie "Look who's back." It takes the concept of "Famous world leader or historical figure is warped to their country in the present day after they die" and sets it in different countries. Here are my Ideas.

Country:Figure brought back (Ex: Germany:Hitler)
America: Patton or Lincoln
Britain:Winston Churchill
France:Napoléon Bonaparte or Charles De Gaulle
Russia:Lenin, Trotsky, or Stalin
Japan: Tojo
Italy: Mussolini or Caesar
Spain: Franco

Might work on one of these.
You could also do an american south verison with Jefferson Davis.
 
Why would he be German, out of curiosity. Wouldn't the parallelism dictate that he would remain American?

Also, Which Turtledove Work should I set in TL 191 next?
How about Shitetl days, the phantom tobulkhin, the last article, ready for the fatherland and news from the front?
 

Trying to brainstorm what the Prequel Trilogy for this line would be like, plotwise.
 

Trying to brainstorm what the Prequel Trilogy for this line would be like, plotwise.
I see it as being the last gasp of free democracy before the rise of the corporations, with a young, naive hacker becoming Zen's protege. Unfortunately, as the corps begin claiming power, the young hacker becomes increasingly concerned about the safety of his loved ones. One of the CEOs notices this and offers them security and privilege if the kid becomes his company's sysadmin.

Eventually, there's a raid on the company's HQ, and the young hacker is shot, left to die as the building burns to the ground. Miraculously, he survives, but is horrifically injured. The CEO who corrupted him has him rebuilt into Vector. Worse, the attack on the HQ backfires - the corps use this as proof that the common folk are out of control and ram through laws that grant them full extraterritorial rights, ensuring corporate dominance throughout the major cities of the world.

Cue the original Cyber Wars line.
 
I see it as being the last gasp of free democracy before the rise of the corporations, with a young, naive hacker becoming Zen's protege. Unfortunately, as the corps begin claiming power, the young hacker becomes increasingly concerned about the safety of his loved ones. One of the CEOs notices this and offers them security and privilege if the kid becomes his company's sysadmin.

Eventually, there's a raid on the company's HQ, and the young hacker is shot, left to die as the building burns to the ground. Miraculously, he survives, but is horrifically injured. The CEO who corrupted him has him rebuilt into Vector. Worse, the attack on the HQ backfires - the corps use this as proof that the common folk are out of control and ram through laws that grant them full extraterritorial rights, ensuring corporate dominance throughout the major cities of the world.

Cue the original Cyber Wars line.
Some character ideas of my own to build on this:

Palpatine: Ceo of a major weapons and space-mining corporation who ostensibly backs the United Earth Government in the Corporate Wars, but is secretly plotting to take over. But he views hackers as a major threat to his plans and seeks to have them terminated, so to start he secretly begins mass-recruiting them into an organization to help in the Corporate Wars.

Anakin: A computer prodigy found in a poorer part of the world who was recruited and trained by the Order as Zen's protege. He is torn between his life as a hacker and his love for a UEG senator, which ultimately becomes his downfall

Clones: An elite fighting force of Cyborg soldiers created by Palpatine to serve as an army for the UEG. But unbeknownst to the world at large, they all have a secret programming within him that compel them to obey him over anyone else. (Would include a Jango bio here, but I don't have any ideas for a Mandalorian counterpart)

The CIS: Ostensibly a group of freedom fighters or insurrectionists who are against the growing corporate domination of the UEG, the truth is they are backed by corporations who percieve themselves as recieving the short end of the stick.
 
SLAM! on Nickelodeon(alternate universe)
Part 1: The Beginning


After premiering the original action Nicktoon "Constant Payne" in 2000, "Constant Payne" has turned out to be a huge hit, even occasionally surpassing fellow hit Nicktoon "SpongeBob SquarePants" in the ratings, during the same time period however, Nickelodeon was losing ground in the 11-15 demographic to Cartoon Network's popular afterschool and late-night action/anime block "Toonami".

During the time period, Nickelodeon began looking for shows and pilots that could be used to lure the tween/young teen demographic back to Nickelodeon.

After "Constant Payne" became a hit, Nickelodeon began to think of the potential for a action block to house shows like "Constant Payne" and the upcoming series "Invader Zim".

They also thought anime had potential on the network if they picked up the right titles and aired them at the right times.

So throughout 2000 and 2001, Nickelodeon began working on a new block to place these shows and acquiring several shows.

At Nickelodeon's 2001 upfront, Nickelodeon officially announced a new Friday night action block targeted towards the tween and young teen audience of 11-15 year olds called SLAM!

At the SLAM! presentation, it was confirmed that "Constant Payne" would air it's second season on the block, it was also confirmed that the new original Nicktoon "Invader Zim" would debut on the block as well as other fellow Nicktoon "Rocket Power" and several acquisitions like "Yu-Gi-Oh", "Mon Colle Knights" and "Alienators: Evolution Continues".

It was stated that the block would launch in August and air from 7-10PM on Fridays.

And people was waiting to see what this "SLAM!" thing was all about......
To Be Continued......
 
For All Mankind
For All Mankind is a British science fiction television series set in a space race taking place during the 19th century. The Timeline, as explained quickly in the intro, is that tech got a boost during a sudden meteor shower in the late 1840s, providing humanity with a new power source in the form of Phlogiston. While much of the tech created with this material ends up being for show and impractical, other materials end up being extremely useful. Despite all of this, history largely plays out as ours did, with the American civil war breaking out. However, in the background, a space race begins.

Season 1 starts with the image of France placing it's flag on the moon in the 1860s, much to the fanfare in Paris and the shock in London. The majority of the first season is focused on character building and the training of British Aethernauts for their moon mission, while also creating a moonbase. The rest of the season is focused on three aethernauts on the moonbase.

Season 2 takes place in the 1880s. By now, Germany has formed and the US has recovered from the civil war, leading to the two nations joining the scramble for the moon, as well as leading to great power tensions. Disputes over mining sites leads to a potential for war breaking out as the US seemingly take over British claims, and it takes a certain sacrifice in order to ensure nothing goes to complete shit.

Season 3 takes place in the Edwardian Era. By now, various other nations have started space programs, such as Russia and even Serbia and China. The main focus for this ongoing season is the three way race to Mars between Germany, The British, and the United States. Other powers aren't in the race, but are sure to try and stake claims now that the moon has been fully claimed by Europeans and North America.
 
Shonen Jump-Man: A Nintendo/Manga TL
In 1986, the year of such debuts as The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Kid Icarus, and to a lesser extent, Castlevania, Nintendo of America partners up with CoroCoro Comics to make a U.S. localization that is different from the Japanese version. Why is the U.S. version different, you may ask? Because CoroCoro has been going on for about 9-10 years by that point, with the likes of Doraemon, admittedly the manga's mascot, being around since the early 70's.

Both parties agreed to this, which led to a first American issue with translations of
Doraemon, The Monster Kid, Game Center Arashi, and Perman, plus a news column, an interview, and recommendations of both Japanimation and Nintendo games. In other words, the Americanized CoroCoro Comics ended up as a proto-Nintendo Power. Granted, Nintendo Power would still exist, and the two magazines would share some content for a few years, but the point still stands.

Then, 1989, HBO came knocking on Nintendo's door asking for anime content, as they are aware of the popularity of the NES resulting in an earlier Doraemon fandom in the States. However, they didn't consider dubbing anime yet. Luckily, they were able to cut all the red tape in order to make a daily four-hour evening lineup on the premium network with the already mentioned first four localized manga, now turned into great anime dubs, plus dubs of the animes for Dash! Yonkuro, Ganbare, Kickers!, Hono no Tokyuji: Dodge Danpei, and Bikkiuman. All of which turned out to be great hits for audiences.

And this is before the likes of Super Mario-kun were even released, for crying out loud! Which would turn out to be one of the longest-running manga and anime franchises in both Japan and the States, and would even be one of Nintendo's bright spots in the 2000's.

As for how 4Kids was able to co-exist? Well, to put it bluntly, they had to rely extra hard on Sega, Mirage Studios, and Konami for help, with the Pokemon, Kirby, and F-Zero anime being dubbed in-house for a weekday morning block on Cartoon Network not unlike both Toonami and Miguzi. As such, 4Kids actually bought the TMNT franchise instead of Nickelodeon and revived it with the CGI flair the OTL 2012 incarnation gave us.


An Expanded Cartoon Network Lineup
In 1989, Ted Turner, Steve Ross, Kirk Kerkorian, and the CEO of Taft Broadcasting all began talks to co-create and co-own an all-animation channel from the libraries and studios of Warner Bros., MGM, United Artists, Hanna-Barbera, Ruby-Spears, and any other companies that get bought out by the affiliated owners. This surplus of content gave them enough for two channels: One for the cartoons of the mid-70's and before, and one for the newer content and beyond. The latter is called Cartoon Network, while the former is called Boomerang.

Basically, the best way to expand upon the already-stacked CN collection is to have Turner Entertainment and WB agree on it since before Day 1, plus getting others on board to get the word out.
You know, this is all great. I wanna see more of this!
 
Top