malcolm-x-being-carried-on-a-stretcher.jpg


El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (better known at the time as Malcolm X) being carried out on a stretcher after his attempted assassination on February 21, 1965, by Talmadge X Heyer, Norman 3X Butler, and Thomas 15X Johnson, all members of the Nation of Islam organization that Shabazz had split with the year before.
-----

Below is an excerpt from a 2006 interview with Talmadge X Heyer (then going by the Islamic name Mujahid Abdul Halim) conducted by Lesley Stahl of 60 Minutes in the wake of El-Shabazz' death from pancreatic cancer in 2005.

...

Lesley Stahl: What did you think when you had heard that Shabazz wanted to talk to you, Butler, and Johnson?

Mujahid Abdul Halim: Well, my first thought was "Ah, hell, he's still alive?! Damnit!"

*Brief laughter from both.*

MAH: Second thought was, is he coming to kill me? I didn't think he'd be able to do it in the middle of a jail with cops all around, but Malcolm was the type of guy who could do anything he put his mind to. I guess my third thought was, yeah, he was gonna come and try to interrogate me and Muhammed and Khalil [referring to the Islamic names of Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson, respectively].

LS: And what did you think about that? How willing or unwilling were you to give up information on the Nation of Islam before Shabazz entered that interrogation room?

MAH: I had this idea that I'd be this unbreakable soldier of the Nation, y'know? [Elijah] Muhammed and [Louis] Farrakhan had really instilled a lot of loyalty in us, in all of us, really. Though, uh, I guess you might also call it "brainwashing", depending on who you ask. But, uh, yeah. I was ready to die before I let anything slip about the Nation, at least until Malcolm showed up.

LS: And what changed your mind? What made you turn on the Nation and tell Shabazz and the police everything?

*Halim sits up in his chair, jabbing his finger in Stahl's direction.*

MAH: Hey. Don't get me wrong. I didn't tell the [profanity] police anything. I was only talking to Malcolm. What he did with that after I told him, that was up to him. But I wasn't talkin' to the [profanity] cops.

LS: Sorry, Mister Halim. So why did you tell Shabazz everything, then?

*Halim settles down, looking thoughtful for several seconds before continuing to speak.*

MAH: 'Cause when he was rolled into that room in his wheelchair, Miss Stahl, and he looked me in the eye, I didn't see a shred of anger or rage or vengeance or anything. All I saw was love, Miss Stahl. Love, and... And pity. He wasn't mad at me, Miss Stahl. He wasn't mad at me or Muhammed or Khalil... Hell, I don't think he was even mad at the Nation, or even Farrakhan or Muhammed. He just looked disappointed. It was like one of God's angels staring at me, right into my soul. He also looked, uh, about as white as you are, which I guess tends to happen when you lost as much blood as he did.

LS: The doctors did say that Shabazz barely survived your assassination attempt. One almost described it as a "miracle".

MAH: Yeah. A miracle. A miracle straight from God that we didn't manage to kill Malcolm, and I thank Him every day for that miracle that He gave us. I don't know what would have happened to us or everyone else in the Nation if Malcolm had died that day. And I think uhh... Well, Malcolm had already been trying to get closer to God over the past year, but I do think God talked to Malcolm while he was on the hospital bed. I really do think that.

*Halim begins to tear up, but continues speaking.*

But, uh, yeah. When I realized that Malcolm wasn't mad at us, I... Well, I thought back to the way that Farrakhan looked when he ordered us to kill Malcolm. I didn't see any love in Farrakhan's eyes. No love for the Black race, for God, for Islam, or for anything else. I just saw hate, and anger; and it was a hate and an anger that I wanted to share in, because I was young and mad and needed something to help me get that out. But, uh... The love that I saw in Malcolm's eyes... I wanted to share in that love even more than I wanted to share in Farrakhan's hate and anger. It was just... Better than what the Nation had to offer. It made me feel better. So, so much better. Before he even sat down, I was already talking. Telling Malcolm everything about what Farrakhan and Muhammed had told us.

...

-----

gettyimages-166704539-594x594.jpg


The funeral of Elijah Muhammad on March 1, 1976, after his death in prison two weeks earlier from heart failure. In spite of his imprisonment nine years earlier after being convicted of conspiracy to commit murder (among many other charges uncovered in the subsequent investigation of the Nation of Islam) and in spite of the Nation's official designation as a criminal organization, Muhammad still had many devout followers who attended his funeral. Police presence at the funeral was significant, but no violence erupted that day.

-----

Below is an excerpt from the film recording of Shabazz' eulogy for Muhammad. While Nation members had warned Shabazz away from Muhammad's funeral, Shabazz attended regardless.

...

El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz: Elijah Muhammad was a good man. He was a man who cared about his Black brothers and sisters. He was a man who cared so much about his Black brothers and sisters that he was willing to do whatever he thought was necessary to keep them safe and to advance their rights. Nobody should ever think for a moment that Elijah wasn't a critical part in helping to open the eyes of Black Americans to the injustices that they faced and still do face at the hands of White supremacy. Yes, he and I disagreed on what should be done to help the Black race, and yes, he and I disagreed on how we should act with regards to white folks. We disagreed so much, he had me shot for it.

*Murmuring from the crowd.*

But he had me shot because he believed it was what was necessary to help his Black brothers and sisters. And for that, Elijah Muhammad was a good man. The first time I received a letter from him while I was in prison in Charlestown, I could feel just from the writing on the paper that he was a good man. I still remember his first letter, in fact, where he told me...

...

-----
0f284b878890cc92a12691979c66bcf71e-07-louis-farrakhan.rsquare.w700.jpg


Louis Farrakhan, speaking at the 1992 Pan-African Islamic Conference in Dar es-Salaam, in the middle of promoting his then-new book, The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews. After Farrakhan discovered that Shabazz had informed law enforcement of the full extent of the Nation of Islam's activities, Farrakhan immediately fled the country to Africa, where he has been living primarily in Lagos since 1965, while also traveling around the continent promoting Pan-Africanism and his own brand of Islamic thought carried on from the now-defunct Nation.
-----

In spite of their best efforts, 60 Minutes was unable to reach Farrakhan for an interview following Shabazz' death in 2005.

-----

muhammad_ali_funeral_ap_img.jpg


Shabazz' funeral on March 1, 2006. Shabazz had specifically requested to be buried on this date, so that his funeral would correspond with the 30th anniversary of Elijah Muhammad's funeral. According to his wife Betty Shabazz, he stated: "Let me have just this one little sentimentality, won't you?" when asked why he wanted to be buried on the same day as Muhammad had been. Shabazz' funeral would be attended by other veterans of the Civil Rights movement, including the family of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the family of the late Rosa Parks, the surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, Bob Moses, and many others.

-----

Below is an excerpt from Yolanda King's eulogy for Shabazz:

...

Yolanda King: I had no idea what to think the first time Malik came over to my house. Wasn't this the man that my father had spoken about so many times, calling him a "madman" and a "loose cannon", saying that he was threatening everything that the Civil Rights Movement was trying to build? What was he doing there, in our living room? I was too young, at least, to consider what might have been the oddity of a devout Muslim standing in the house of a Baptist preacher.

Soon enough, though, I was calling him "Uncle Malik". I could tell that him and my father had their disagreements, but I could also tell that the two men had rapidly developed a relationship close enough that my mother had started to become jealous.

*Brief laughter from the crowd.*

Two men, united in love. United in a love of God, in a love of their Black brothers and sisters, in a love of justice, and in a love for humanity in general. And through that unity, they talked with each other. They talked theology, yes, and they talked politics, certainly, but they also talked strategy, and they talked tactics. Uncle Malik still carried with him some of that militant firebrand nature from before the attempt on his life, and my father once told me "Malik is the one that spurs me to action when I'm being too slow, and I'm the one that holds Malik back when he's going too fast. We're stronger together than we could ever have been apart."

And I think that all of us here today know how true that was. Before my father was himself assassinated on that dark day nearly four decades ago now, Uncle Malik and Doctor King marched together across this great nation, two giants of men sweeping aside injustice and racism where-ever they saw it. Even after my father was killed, Uncle Malik didn't stop. If anything, he carried Doctor King's soul with him as he continued the God-given work of liberating Black Americans from the oppression and suffering they experienced at the hands of white supremacy. Seems like the only thing that could stop Uncle Malik was God calling one of His greatest children back. And I'm sure that he's up there with dad now, laughing together like they used to.

*Miss King begins to tear up, and takes a moment to wipe her eyes before continuing.*

Of course, racism and white supremacy still exists in America today, in spite of the best efforts by my father and Uncle Malik to fight against it. Maybe it'll always be here. But Uncle Malik left me - and many other people here - with plenty of wisdom about how to carry on the fight, and seeing the way that Black Americans across this nation are still engaging in that perhaps eternal struggle for justice, I know that Uncle Malik's legacy will last for a while yet. I still remember what he told me at my father's own funeral, actually, when he said...

...

-----

Following Shabazz' funeral, a movement began in Congress to award him with a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom. On April 4th, 2008 - the 40th anniversary of Dr. King's assassination - the Civil Rights leader was indeed posthumously granted a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

-----


OOC: Malcolm X survives his assassination attempt. His near-death experience is the capstone to a year of becoming a more devout Muslim, and being more open to the nonviolent civil resistance tactics espoused by Doctor King and other members of the Civil Rights Movement. Him and King become close friends and collaborators, and Malcolm X's passion (and still sometimes belligerence) helps to reinvigorate the Civil Rights Movement and keep it carrying on with as much momentum as before even after King is assassinated as in OTL. By the time of Malcolm X's death in 2005, civil rights for American blacks ITTL are stronger than they are even at present in OTL, with voter disenfranchisement for people of color being aggressively confronted whenever it arises, community policing being a more widespread practice (especially in urban areas and other heavily colored communities), and with blacks and other people of color having a much higher rate of political participation than in OTL, among other effects.

Thanks to Malcolm X convincing his would-be assassins to flip on the Nation of Islam, the organization that Elijah Muhammad ran practically ceases to exist by the 70s; Malcolm X's exhibition of an ideal traditional Muslim worshiper on the national stage, though, still encourages some disaffected Black youths to convert to mainstream Sunni Islam, and a national community of Black American Muslims exists at present ITTL. This likely has ramifications regarding America's geopolitical interactions with the Middle East (imaginably manifesting in Black Americans more actively protesting against American military involvement in Islamic countries) but I don't want to extrapolate too much here.

As an addendum, I can imagine him and Cesar Chavez cooperating during both the Grape Strike and later on, his interactions with Doctor King helping him to connect across religious lines with the deeply devout Catholic Chavez. Malcolm X exhibited a lot of interest in socialist thought in his last year, including speaking at the Militant Labor Forum of the Socialist Workers Party; more than likely, he'd adopt Islamic socialism and work with Chavez and other religious leftist figures to help advance workers' and labor rights in the middle of advancing Black rights.
 
1596847268191.png

The infamous mobster Lyndon "Big Iron" Johnson of the Dallas Mafia, seen above during the legendary gang war, vowing revenge before fleeing the state.​
 
View attachment 574233

El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (better known at the time as Malcolm X) being carried out on a stretcher after his attempted assassination on February 21, 1965, by Talmadge X Heyer, Norman 3X Butler, and Thomas 15X Johnson, all members of the Nation of Islam organization that Shabazz had split with the year before.
-----

Below is an excerpt from a 2006 interview with Talmadge X Heyer (then going by the Islamic name Mujahid Abdul Halim) conducted by Lesley Stahl of 60 Minutes in the wake of El-Shabazz' death from pancreatic cancer in 2005.

...

Lesley Stahl: What did you think when you had heard that Shabazz wanted to talk to you, Butler, and Johnson?

Mujahid Abdul Halim: Well, my first thought was "Ah, hell, he's still alive?! Damnit!"

*Brief laughter from both.*

MAH: Second thought was, is he coming to kill me? I didn't think he'd be able to do it in the middle of a jail with cops all around, but Malcolm was the type of guy who could do anything he put his mind to. I guess my third thought was, yeah, he was gonna come and try to interrogate me and Muhammed and Khalil [referring to the Islamic names of Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson, respectively].

LS: And what did you think about that? How willing or unwilling were you to give up information on the Nation of Islam before Shabazz entered that interrogation room?

MAH: I had this idea that I'd be this unbreakable soldier of the Nation, y'know? [Elijah] Muhammed and [Louis] Farrakhan had really instilled a lot of loyalty in us, in all of us, really. Though, uh, I guess you might also call it "brainwashing", depending on who you ask. But, uh, yeah. I was ready to die before I let anything slip about the Nation, at least until Malcolm showed up.

LS: And what changed your mind? What made you turn on the Nation and tell Shabazz and the police everything?

*Halim sits up in his chair, jabbing his finger in Stahl's direction.*

MAH: Hey. Don't get me wrong. I didn't tell the [profanity] police anything. I was only talking to Malcolm. What he did with that after I told him, that was up to him. But I wasn't talkin' to the [profanity] cops.

LS: Sorry, Mister Halim. So why did you tell Shabazz everything, then?

*Halim settles down, looking thoughtful for several seconds before continuing to speak.*

MAH: 'Cause when he was rolled into that room in his wheelchair, Miss Stahl, and he looked me in the eye, I didn't see a shred of anger or rage or vengeance or anything. All I saw was love, Miss Stahl. Love, and... And pity. He wasn't mad at me, Miss Stahl. He wasn't mad at me or Muhammed or Khalil... Hell, I don't think he was even mad at the Nation, or even Farrakhan or Muhammed. He just looked disappointed. It was like one of God's angels staring at me, right into my soul. He also looked, uh, about as white as you are, which I guess tends to happen when you lost as much blood as he did.

LS: The doctors did say that Shabazz barely survived your assassination attempt. One almost described it as a "miracle".

MAH: Yeah. A miracle. A miracle straight from God that we didn't manage to kill Malcolm, and I thank Him every day for that miracle that He gave us. I don't know what would have happened to us or everyone else in the Nation if Malcolm had died that day. And I think uhh... Well, Malcolm had already been trying to get closer to God over the past year, but I do think God talked to Malcolm while he was on the hospital bed. I really do think that.

*Halim begins to tear up, but continues speaking.*

But, uh, yeah. When I realized that Malcolm wasn't mad at us, I... Well, I thought back to the way that Farrakhan looked when he ordered us to kill Malcolm. I didn't see any love in Farrakhan's eyes. No love for the Black race, for God, for Islam, or for anything else. I just saw hate, and anger; and it was a hate and an anger that I wanted to share in, because I was young and mad and needed something to help me get that out. But, uh... The love that I saw in Malcolm's eyes... I wanted to share in that love even more than I wanted to share in Farrakhan's hate and anger. It was just... Better than what the Nation had to offer. It made me feel better. So, so much better. Before he even sat down, I was already talking. Telling Malcolm everything about what Farrakhan and Muhammed had told us.

...

-----

View attachment 574234

The funeral of Elijah Muhammad on March 1, 1976, after his death in prison two weeks earlier from heart failure. In spite of his imprisonment nine years earlier after being convicted of conspiracy to commit murder (among many other charges uncovered in the subsequent investigation of the Nation of Islam) and in spite of the Nation's official designation as a criminal organization, Muhammad still had many devout followers who attended his funeral. Police presence at the funeral was significant, but no violence erupted that day.

-----

Below is an excerpt from the film recording of Shabazz' eulogy for Muhammad. While Nation members had warned Shabazz away from Muhammad's funeral, Shabazz attended regardless.

...

El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz: Elijah Muhammad was a good man. He was a man who cared about his Black brothers and sisters. He was a man who cared so much about his Black brothers and sisters that he was willing to do whatever he thought was necessary to keep them safe and to advance their rights. Nobody should ever think for a moment that Elijah wasn't a critical part in helping to open the eyes of Black Americans to the injustices that they faced and still do face at the hands of White supremacy. Yes, he and I disagreed on what should be done to help the Black race, and yes, he and I disagreed on how we should act with regards to white folks. We disagreed so much, he had me shot for it.

*Murmuring from the crowd.*

But he had me shot because he believed it was what was necessary to help his Black brothers and sisters. And for that, Elijah Muhammad was a good man. The first time I received a letter from him while I was in prison in Charlestown, I could feel just from the writing on the paper that he was a good man. I still remember his first letter, in fact, where he told me...

...

-----
View attachment 574235

Louis Farrakhan, speaking at the 1992 Pan-African Islamic Conference in Dar es-Salaam, in the middle of promoting his then-new book, The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews. After Farrakhan discovered that Shabazz had informed law enforcement of the full extent of the Nation of Islam's activities, Farrakhan immediately fled the country to Africa, where he has been living primarily in Lagos since 1965, while also traveling around the continent promoting Pan-Africanism and his own brand of Islamic thought carried on from the now-defunct Nation.
-----

In spite of their best efforts, 60 Minutes was unable to reach Farrakhan for an interview following Shabazz' death in 2005.

-----

View attachment 574236

Shabazz' funeral on March 1, 2006. Shabazz had specifically requested to be buried on this date, so that his funeral would correspond with the 30th anniversary of Elijah Muhammad's funeral. According to his wife Betty Shabazz, he stated: "Let me have just this one little sentimentality, won't you?" when asked why he wanted to be buried on the same day as Muhammad had been. Shabazz' funeral would be attended by other veterans of the Civil Rights movement, including the family of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the family of the late Rosa Parks, the surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, Bob Moses, and many others.

-----

Below is an excerpt from Yolanda King's eulogy for Shabazz:

...

Yolanda King: I had no idea what to think the first time Malik came over to my house. Wasn't this the man that my father had spoken about so many times, calling him a "madman" and a "loose cannon", saying that he was threatening everything that the Civil Rights Movement was trying to build? What was he doing there, in our living room? I was too young, at least, to consider what might have been the oddity of a devout Muslim standing in the house of a Baptist preacher.

Soon enough, though, I was calling him "Uncle Malik". I could tell that him and my father had their disagreements, but I could also tell that the two men had rapidly developed a relationship close enough that my mother had started to become jealous.

*Brief laughter from the crowd.*

Two men, united in love. United in a love of God, in a love of their Black brothers and sisters, in a love of justice, and in a love for humanity in general. And through that unity, they talked with each other. They talked theology, yes, and they talked politics, certainly, but they also talked strategy, and they talked tactics. Uncle Malik still carried with him some of that militant firebrand nature from before the attempt on his life, and my father once told me "Malik is the one that spurs me to action when I'm being too slow, and I'm the one that holds Malik back when he's going too fast. We're stronger together than we could ever have been apart."

And I think that all of us here today know how true that was. Before my father was himself assassinated on that dark day nearly four decades ago now, Uncle Malik and Doctor King marched together across this great nation, two giants of men sweeping aside injustice and racism where-ever they saw it. Even after my father was killed, Uncle Malik didn't stop. If anything, he carried Doctor King's soul with him as he continued the God-given work of liberating Black Americans from the oppression and suffering they experienced at the hands of white supremacy. Seems like the only thing that could stop Uncle Malik was God calling one of His greatest children back. And I'm sure that he's up there with dad now, laughing together like they used to.

*Miss King begins to tear up, and takes a moment to wipe her eyes before continuing.*

Of course, racism and white supremacy still exists in America today, in spite of the best efforts by my father and Uncle Malik to fight against it. Maybe it'll always be here. But Uncle Malik left me - and many other people here - with plenty of wisdom about how to carry on the fight, and seeing the way that Black Americans across this nation are still engaging in that perhaps eternal struggle for justice, I know that Uncle Malik's legacy will last for a while yet. I still remember what he told me at my father's own funeral, actually, when he said...

...

-----

Following Shabazz' funeral, a movement began in Congress to award him with a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom. On April 4th, 2008 - the 40th anniversary of Dr. King's assassination - the Civil Rights leader was indeed posthumously granted a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

-----


OOC: Malcolm X survives his assassination attempt. His near-death experience is the capstone to a year of becoming a more devout Muslim, and being more open to the nonviolent civil resistance tactics espoused by Doctor King and other members of the Civil Rights Movement. Him and King become close friends and collaborators, and Malcolm X's passion (and still sometimes belligerence) helps to reinvigorate the Civil Rights Movement and keep it carrying on with as much momentum as before even after King is assassinated as in OTL. By the time of Malcolm X's death in 2005, civil rights for American blacks ITTL are stronger than they are even at present in OTL, with voter disenfranchisement for people of color being aggressively confronted whenever it arises, community policing being a more widespread practice (especially in urban areas and other heavily colored communities), and with blacks and other people of color having a much higher rate of political participation than in OTL, among other effects.

Thanks to Malcolm X convincing his would-be assassins to flip on the Nation of Islam, the organization that Elijah Muhammad ran practically ceases to exist by the 70s; Malcolm X's exhibition of an ideal traditional Muslim worshiper on the national stage, though, still encourages some disaffected Black youths to convert to mainstream Sunni Islam, and a national community of Black American Muslims exists at present ITTL. This likely has ramifications regarding America's geopolitical interactions with the Middle East (imaginably manifesting in Black Americans more actively protesting against American military involvement in Islamic countries) but I don't want to extrapolate too much here.

As an addendum, I can imagine him and Cesar Chavez cooperating during both the Grape Strike and later on, his interactions with Doctor King helping him to connect across religious lines with the deeply devout Catholic Chavez. Malcolm X exhibited a lot of interest in socialist thought in his last year, including speaking at the Militant Labor Forum of the Socialist Workers Party; more than likely, he'd adopt Islamic socialism and work with Chavez and other religious leftist figures to help advance workers' and labor rights in the middle of advancing Black rights.
 
Do you guys remember when the photos of Jour J's comics showing an alternate version of the 2000's where added to the original Photos from Alternate Worlds Thread a few years back? Well, here are a few pages from one of the comics shown an alternate version of late 2004-early 2005.

I used Google Translate to translate the French to English, so it might not be 100% accurate, so fair warning!

jourJ-T-29-1.jpg

Comic panel scrip (rough translation)
December 13, 2004.
FBI agent: He looks serious, John Kerry! Massachusetts men always make good presidents, don't they?
Other FBI agent: Anyway, the Bush years are over old man! A little madat, and chao!
FBI agent: Do you think the Democrats are going to get him out of purgatory?
Other FBI agent: Do you mean D'o'Neill? Nothing is less certain. Purgatory is Prince Des Tenebres Square, isn't it?
FBI agent: In your place, I wouldn't say that in front of him!
Other FBI agent: Still his damn character, huh?
FBI agent: And it doesn't get better. Four years out of the agency doesn't improve the mood of even the nicest. And O'Neill is anything but nice.
Other FBI agent: Here is Kerry, here is the new president!


jourJ-T-29-2.jpg

Other FBI agent: It is all the same thanks to O'Neill that we were able to avoid these attacks!
FBI agent: Who knows ... there are some in the Bureau who say that he qurait invents all this Bin Laden and Al-Qaeda, The operation of the planes, to fail!
Other FBI agent: Bullshit! I have known O'Neill for years, he's a strong character but he never tried to put himself forward in this way!
FBI agent: Maybe, but that didn't stop her from alienating the entire Bush cabinet.
Other FBI agent: And we must recognize that these birds have a stubborn grudge!


jourJ-T-29-3.jpg

Washington, January 21, 2005, the day after President Kerry was inaugurated.

Richard: Mr. President, we should talk about appointments to different positions ...
John Kerry: Of coarse,, Richard give me that!
John Kerry: John O'Neill, it's that former FBI agent who ...
Richard: Yes it's him.
John Kerry: You knew him well, didn't you?
Richard: That's right, a remarkable man,the Prince of Darkness!
John Kerry: Was that his nickname?
Richard: Yes, he always dressed in black. The Vice President is waiting in the anteroom to tell you his story.
John Kerry: Barack? I didn't know they knew each other. Let him in, Richard.

jourJ-T-29-4.jpg

Eight years earlier ... June 25, 1996, Tours of Khobar, Saudi Arabia.

If I got any of the translations wrong, please tell me!
 
Last edited:
Blood Rights
(So I decided to see what everyone favorite time traveling British tv show would look like in the BR universe here are some of my ideas.)
Who Is The Doctor?
1597195373267.png

Michael Hordern as the Second Doctor played with a more serous note as a Doctor who lost his way after his granddaughter death. This version of the Doctor would have a personality in words of the actor “as a mix between a eccentric homeless man and a depressed Sherlock Holmes” he would also be the first Doctor to have a vampire companion “Polly” a female ex flying ace who was captured by the german after a crash and was turned as an experiment.
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lalla Ward as the first female Doctor and the forth incarnation of the Time Lord. She some of her more stand out campions during her run would be Leela a vampire from almost ten thousand years in past brought to the modern era after the Tardis crashed landed, her robotic side kick k9, Sarah-Jane a human woman, and even for on and off again period time her version of The Master played by Tom Baker.
1597197059133.jpeg

Tom Baker’s Master Standing beside the forth Doctor in the episode “At Wits and World Ends”Tom Baker‘s Master was played as less of an all out evil figure and as more as a “bad influence” on the Doctor.A running joke between them would be that of the Doctors age and their genders being “flipped” implying that the master was at one point most likely in his first body a woman.
1597198250454.jpeg

This idea would be taken to the extreme in the 80’s with the 7th Doctor being played by a young vampire this isolated many of the long time adult viewers and focused more so on the sillier parts of the stories which would help lead to the series being cancelled in 1989 only to brought back as a series of movies and then a reboot tv show.

1597198451317.jpeg

Paul McGann as the 8th Doctor between 1993-1997 as a more down to earth doctor he play a mature role and star in the “War Of Time” movie (1998) before dying in said movie. His Master as well would be played with a much darker tone with the Master sent back five thousand years without anyway out and on his finial dying regeneration and forced to become a vampire time lord hybrid to survive. After his death in the “War Of Time” the Master would not been again until 2007.
1597199022797.jpeg

While Freema Agyeman would be the first woman of color to play the Master on screen in cannon she would had been the third one with her saying in her first episode “back to the old body, look Doctor it’s looks like I just graduated the Academy again!”. While still undead the Master would over the course of serval seasons and three Doctors try to become fully time lord again by drinking the Doctor blood before being killed off in the “End Of Everything” only to be brought back in the latest season.
1597199545838.jpeg

Idris Elba as the current Doctor.​
 
Blood Rights
(So I decided to see what everyone favorite time traveling British tv show would look like in the BR universe here are some of my ideas.)
Who Is The Doctor?


View attachment 574565
While Freema Agyeman would be the first woman of color to play the Master on screen in cannon she would had been the third one with her saying in her first episode “back to the old body, look Doctor it’s looks like I just graduated the Academy again!”. While still undead the Master would over the course of serval seasons and three Doctors try to become fully time lord again by drinking the Doctor blood before being killed off in the “End Of Everything” only to be brought back in the latest season.​
Honestly I kinda got the idea to have Freema as the Master at last minute, but I think it could work.
 
Do you guys remember when the photos of Jour J's comics showing an alternate version of the 2000's where added to the original Photos from Alternate Worlds Thread a few years back? Well, here are a few pages from one of the comics shown an alternate version of late 2004-early 2005.

I'll add the images now and add translations of what people are saying from Google tomorrow.

View attachment 574479
A seen from an alternate version of December 13, 2004.

View attachment 574481
People waving American flags welcoming President elect John Kerry (who seemingly defeated George W. Bush in the 2004 election)

View attachment 574482
President John Kerry's first full day in office on January 21, 2005. President Kerry is talking with someone in the Oval Office.

View attachment 574485
Something is happening in Saudi Arabia in 1996.
Is there an English version of this comic?
 
1597244608260.png

The Walking Dead is an American horror/drama television series created and produced by Frank Darabont, mostly known for his work on 2007's The Mist. The show aired on HBO from February 10, 2008 to December 14, 2014, consisting of 6 seasons and 72 episodes. It was set and filmed in Atlanta, Georgia for the first season, Senoia for the second season, North and South Carolina for the third and fourth season, and lastly Virginia for the fifth and sixth season.

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The series tells the story of Rick Grimes (Thomas Jane), a former sherriff's deputy from King County, Georgia who awakens from a coma into the apocalypse. When he wakes up and is aware of the apocalypse, he sets out to find his family. His son, Carl Grimes (Jacob Kogan) and his wife Lori Grimes (Sarah Wayne Callies). When he meets Glenn Rhee (Steven Yeun) and Glenn leads him to the camp he's been staying at, where he finds his family and his best friend and his sherriff's partner Shane Walsh (Jon Berthnal). We explore his journey and what he loses along the way throughout the series.

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The first season recieved generally good reviews, the second season recieved very positive reviews (mostly due to it's first episode, about the military moving into Atlanta), the third season and on recieved universal acclaim. Many critics laud it as one of HBO's greatest shows, and one of the greatest shows made. Many of the seasons had high production budgets, making each episode seem almost like little movies. By the time the third season had ended the show was on Netflix, explaining the higher viewership for the fourth season and on. By the time that the series finale aired, it had been one of the most watched cable shows on Television, competing with AMC's Breaking Bad.​
 
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The Walking Dead is an American horror/drama television series created and produced by Frank Darabont, mostly known for his work on 2007's The Mist. The show aired on HBO from February 10, 2008 to December 14, 2014, consisting of 6 seasons and 72 episodes. It was set and filmed in Atlanta, Georgia for the first season, Senoia for the second season, North and South Carolina for the third and fourth season, and lastly Virginia for the fifth and sixth season.

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The series tells the story of Rick Grimes (Thomas Jane), a former sherriff's deputy from King County, Georgia who awakens from a coma into the apocalypse. When he wakes up and is aware of the apocalypse, he sets out to find his family. His son, Carl Grimes (Jacob Kogan) and his wife Lori Grimes (Sarah Wayne Callies). When he meets Glenn Rhee (Steven Yeun) and Glenn leads him to the camp he's been staying at, where he finds his family and his best friend and his sherriff's partner Shane Walsh (Jon Berthnal). We explore his journey and what he loses along the way throughout the series.

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The first season recieved generally good reviews, the second season recieved very positive reviews (mostly due to it's first episode, about the military moving into Atlanta), the third season and on recieved universal acclaim. Many critics laud it as one of HBO's greatest shows, and one of the greatest shows made. Many of the seasons had high production budgets, making each episode seem almost like little movies. By the time the third season had ended the show was on Netflix, explaining the higher viewership for the fourth season and on. By the time that the series finale aired, it had been one of the most watched cable shows on Television, competing with AMC's Breaking Bad.​
How TWD should have ended.
 
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Kyle Bale, the son of a possible relationship between Kate Winslet and Christian Bale, the actor has always denied that the son was not his, often saying in public that he never had an affair with the actress, after DNA tests the paternity was confirmed of the son, today Christian Bale refuses to have contact with the son
 
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