Of lost monkeys and broken vehicles

Anglophile and not Greek are different things of course. That said Greek-British ties are even closer TTL than they were OTL...
It seems his father was the driving force behind the obsession to make Alec an "Englishman", home-life revolved around his parents desire to be English above all else.

Though initially Alec was baptized into the Greek Orthodox Church like his father (his mother's family being Roman Catholic), as he grew older his father decided that Protestantism was an important mark of being British and sent Alec to morning Sunday school every week. They attempted to observe the Greek custom of giving children lambs as pets which would then be slaughtered at Easter, Alec though opted to spare the lamb he was given that later grew into a big bad tempered ram (the idea of slaughtering lambs would forever put him off lamb chops).

In terms of language Constantine would always speak to Alec in English at home along with his young friends, Hulda would speak to him in German (later abandoning it in favour of English with an accent she never lost). Then there was the everyday language known as "kitchen" Greek which was used for communication with merchants, traders and servants, containing elements of not only Greek but like most pidgin languages was influenced by the vocabulary and grammar of the many different communities that used it (later in life he forgot anything other than English).

Alec's father was also the 2nd youngest of 8 children (two of which passed away in early in life), from the paternal family tree in the Official Biography it appears Constantine could have potentially lived for another two decades instead of passing away in 1923 (with the possibility Alec would not be an only child). With Constantine's older brothers likely having a greater role in the family business in Greece (and setting up shop in places like Beirut) it would be plausible for Alec Issigonis's family to decide to make the move to the UK in ATL (albeit in much better circumstances compared to OTL).

2019 numbers are of course skewed by heavy industry moving away to countries with relatively lower labour costs. Which is why Czechia or Slovakia or for that matter Turkey are producing more cars than Italy. That's why Sweden is a better model I think. If TTL Greece manages to be building half a million cars a year a century down the line I'd be more than happy. But that's far in the future. For all we know Greece by then may be third world with borders on the Olympus...

Guess ATL Greece being a major car producing nation depends on whether the defeated ATL Turks realise their revanchist ambitions or experience a similar fate as OTL post-WW2 Germany.
 
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Part 29
Athens, March 25th, 1925

The second Greek republic was officially proclaimed on Greece's independence day. The next day a joint session of the parliament and the senate elected admiral Koundouriotis, till then regent, as president of the republic, with only the Communist party senators voting against him. Otherwise life went on. The economy was keeping to grow, with ambitious plans to further extend the Greek railroad and road network and improve port facilities around the country. Marshland was being reclaimed in Macedonia and elsewhere, the largest project was draining the gigantic malarial swamp to the west of Thessaloniki that was Lake Giannitsa despite the arguments from some officers in the Greek army that the project was endangering the defences of Thessaloniki. Agrarian reform had accelerated since 1922 with the added impetus of the slightly over 1 million people from Turkey, Bulgaria and the Soviet Union that had to be resettled in the country. Exchangee resettlement was one of the biggest items in the Greek budget, outlays in the previous three years had already totalled 31 million pounds including an internal loan of 5 million pounds in 1923. But it was estimated that at least as much would be needed over the following years while the drachma kept losing ground relative to the pound.

Bulgaria, April 1925

The country was in ever increasing turmoil since the end of the war. The Agrarian Union's democratically elected government had been overthrown by the army and IMRO militants in June 1923, rumours claimed with Italian financing, after prime minister Alexandar Stamboliyski had signed a treaty with the kingdom of Yugoslavia to suppress IMRO raids into Yugoslav territory and rejected Italian overtures to sign a secret military alliance aimed at Yugoslavia and Greece. Stamboliysky had been then brutally murdered and a regime under Alexandar Tsankov took over the government. Raids against Greece and Yugoslavia had continued unabated while thoughout the rest of the year and 1924 both the Agrarians and the strong Bulgarian Communist party which had polled over 19% in the 1923 elections were forcibly suppressed. The communists had fought back with a failed coup attempt of their own in September 1923, with over 800 killed in the fighting that erupted, and a series of terrorist attacks by the "military organization" of the party throughout 1924. This now came to a head with the the MO attempting and failing to assassinate king Boris III in early April and successfully assassinating general Konstantin Georgiev. Worse was to come in Georgiev's funeral as the MO bombed the St Nedelya church leaving 150 killed and about half a thousand wounded. Tsankov promptly declared martial law and proceeded to even more violently suppressing the communists with hundreds of people summarily executed over the next few weeks. There would be a while till Bulgaria returned to normality. In the meantime both Greece and Yugoslavia were getting increasingly annoyed at the raids in their territory. Border posts were reinforced while consultations between the two allies begun over joint action to terminate the raids...

Rome, May 1925

Mustapha Kemal had decided to accept Mussolini's invitation to temporarily settle to Rome. Italy was of course occupying South-Western Anatolia, Caria the Italians were calling it, but that was supposed to be temporary. And even if it was not, Turkey had more serious issues and if it was to fight Greece again to recover the lost territories, it needed allies. Mussolini's Italy might be opportunistic but was the only viable ally against Greece. Britain and a France had show their preference to Greece, the Soviets were potentially useful but an unlike ally, Turkey remained in the grip of the house of Osman and this was perceived by Moscow to be in Britain's pocket, not without some justification and Germany not much of a factor after the war. Only Italy was left. After all Smyrna and Constantinople were worth Mugla. For now.

Athens, August 1925

The army had held competitive trials between two sets of test Mannlicher rifles, locally made at the newly established Hephaestus works, one chambered in Pedersen's new 7x51 cartridge and one chambered to the older Mauser 7x57. Pedersen's round was slightly less powerful but appeared preferable to the committee overseeing the tests, no doubt the similarity of the round to the existing Greek 6.5x54 helped. It was decided to adopt the round. Not the semi-automatic rifle Pedersen was designing though. This was not quite ready yet, was expected to cost considerably more than OTL and the committee did not like the use of a waxed cartridge. Instead the Mannlicher-Philippides bolt action rifle a simplified version of the Mannlicher-Schoenauer was chosen with 200,000 rifles in total ordered directly from Vickers and her Hephaestus subsidiary. Pedersen might have failed to obtain a order for his rifle alongside the cartridge but had piqued the interest of Vickers, enough for its representatives in the United States to start negotiating obtaining a licence for the rifle. This though would have to wait for the US army trials which were scheduled for the next year though...

Greek-Bulgarian border, September 1925

How the incident had begun was open to debate. The Bulgarians would later claim Greek soldiers had crossed the border at which point the Bulgarians opened up on them. The Greeks would claim the Bulgarians had opened fire against a Greek border outpost without provocation and the Bulgarian regulars were trying to help a group of IMRO militants pursued by the Greeks escape over the border. No matter which side was reporting the truth what was clear was that two Greek soldiers had been killed followed by a skirmish between the Greek company covering the border outpost and its Bulgarian opposite number. But the Greeks and the Yugoslavs were anticipating such an incident and were quicker to react. Within a day both the Greek and Yugoslav ambassadors had delivered communiques, demanding from Bulgaria compensation for the deaths of the Greek soldiers and to take immediate action to stop the raids against their territory, while the matter was taken to the League of Nations. Bulgaria would be condemned by the League and forced to pay reparations to the families of the Greek soldiers that had been either killed or wounded in the incident. The Tsankov government in Bulgaria would be replaced before the year was out...
 
Great update as usual. We seem to be building towards Turkey (and potentially Bulgaria) being fully fledged members of the Axis, which will certainly shake the war up. How's Albania looking around now?
 
Great TL! I only started reading a couple of days ago.

I agree it seems as Bulgaria and Turkey will fall in the delusion of German victory in round two. And this time (compared to OTL) it will be quite different for Bulgaria. AFAIK, Bulgaria never pulled away from the Russian influence, even with the Reds rulling Russia. And allegedly that's why the Bulgarian Army ddin't participate in the Eastern Front. Will be things different now, since the failed Communist coup in Bulgaria?
 
Great update as usual. We seem to be building towards Turkey (and potentially Bulgaria) being fully fledged members of the Axis, which will certainly shake the war up. How's Albania looking around now?
In hindsight this would look of course as a bad idea. Without hindsight? Turkey has strong incentive for a return engagement TTL. But everything would be highly dependent upon Turkish leadership at the time of crisis... assuming the crisis comes in the first place.

Great TL! I only started reading a couple of days ago.

I agree it seems as Bulgaria and Turkey will fall in the delusion of German victory in round two. And this time (compared to OTL) it will be quite different for Bulgaria. AFAIK, Bulgaria never pulled away from the Russian influence, even with the Reds rulling Russia. And allegedly that's why the Bulgarian Army ddin't participate in the Eastern Front. Will be things different now, since the failed Communist coup in Bulgaria?
Actually the Bulgarian events up to the crisis with Greece are straight from OTL. The only difference is how Venizelos handles the crisis...
 
Actually the Bulgarian events up to the crisis with Greece are straight from OTL. The only difference is how Venizelos handles the crisis...

Oops! Embarrassingly, I had missed this part of Bulgarian history (not that I really know very much about it).
Thanks!
 
How much is the Greek debt ITTL compared to OTL? Also 1 mill refugees? That sounds like too much if you look at OTL numbers where Greece got 1.5 mill if you think that the majority of those were from West Anatolia which ITTL is Greek.

I didn't see Stamboliyski dying this time around so we could see an agrarian restoration in Bulgaria which happened OTL in 1930 or we could see a communist takeover? If the Agrarians get restored maybe they go friendly towards Greece and Yugoslavia for trade concessions to get their economy up again or on the other hand the Czar may set up a puppet government.

So could the Kemal presence in Italy lead to a military reform there and we could see a functioning Italian army ITTL? OR is it just a station in the Kemal journey? OR even he gets Mussolini to back his return to Turkey?

Can we have a timetable on when the 200k rifles will be completed?

This 1925 incident is a masterful reaction of the Greek diplomacy unlike OTL where they attacked and got imposed reparations and also it led to a change in Bulgarian government and maybe a friendlier one? Although usually when a nation sees that the world mistreats them they go to the edge maybe a fascist or a communist route.
 
How much is the Greek debt ITTL compared to OTL?
That's a somewhat complicated question. Up to December 1920 everything is the same of course. Afterwards:

In TTL:
1921: 13.8 million pounds of unused war credits are drawn to finance the war effort
1922: $10 million loan to build Athens water system
1923: $8 million Canadian war loan +800 million drachmas internal loan
1924: No loans
1925: No loans

In total roughly 17.6 million pounds in foreign currency and 800 million in drachmas.

In OTL:
1922: 1,570 million drachmas "forced" loan
1923: $8 million Canadian war loan +800 million drachmas internal loan
1924: 12.3 million pounds refugee loan
1925: $10 million loan to build Athens water system +$21 million Belgian railroads loan +100 million internal loan

In total 20.1 million pounds in foreign currency and 2,470 million in drachmas.

Also 1 mill refugees? That sounds like too much if you look at OTL numbers where Greece got 1.5 mill if you think that the majority of those were from West Anatolia which ITTL is Greek.
To be exact ~1,050,000. How come when there are ~861,000 Greeks in East Thrace and Ionia plus about ~404,000 in Constantinople and the Italian zone? Three factors. The Greeks have also taken in ~228,000 Armenians and ~150,000 Caucasus Greeks in addition to which they suffered ~300,000 fewer civilian deaths (they still suffer ~161,000 civilian deaths in 1914-21). So the actual number of Asia Minor Greeks in this number is about ~617,000.

I didn't see Stamboliyski dying this time around so we could see an agrarian restoration in Bulgaria which happened OTL in 1930 or we could see a communist takeover? If the Agrarians get restored maybe they go friendly towards Greece and Yugoslavia for trade concessions to get their economy up again or on the other hand the Czar may set up a puppet government.
He did die it is in part 29...

So could the Kemal presence in Italy lead to a military reform there and we could see a functioning Italian army ITTL? OR is it just a station in the Kemal journey? OR even he gets Mussolini to back his return to Turkey?
Why the Italian army would want to follow the advice of a self exiled Ottoman general? He's neither Hannibal nor Alexander. That said Kemal at this moment is self exiled yes, but his lieutenants (Kazim Karabekir and Rauf Orbay included TTL) hold most power within the Sivas government. Kemal chose to self exile for his reasons, from the noble like easing things to the much less noble like putting the blame to his successors for the peace and the first years after the peace.

Can we have a timetable on when the 200k rifles will be completed?
No. :p I'll only say that Greek domestic production in not going to be much more than 10-12,000 a year initially.
This 1925 incident is a masterful reaction of the Greek diplomacy unlike OTL where they attacked and got imposed reparations and also it led to a change in Bulgarian government and maybe a friendlier one? Although usually when a nation sees that the world mistreats them they go to the edge maybe a fascist or a communist route.
There is the slight difference between your diplomacy being run by arguably Europe's most talented diplomat at the time and your diplomacy being run by a general who's military talents most certainly did not extend to being diplomatic.
 
Great TL! I only started reading a couple of days ago.

I agree it seems as Bulgaria and Turkey will fall in the delusion of German victory in round two. And this time (compared to OTL) it will be quite different for Bulgaria. AFAIK, Bulgaria never pulled away from the Russian influence, even with the Reds rulling Russia. And allegedly that's why the Bulgarian Army ddin't participate in the Eastern Front. Will be things different now, since the failed Communist coup in Bulgaria?
Between 1885 and 1944 Bulgaria could be said to be a Russian ally only between 1903 and 1913. During the rest of time relations varied from indifferent to outright hostile. The reason why no troops were sent on the Eastern Front was that such a move would have been enormously unpopular, even while the Bulgarian leadership probably hoped for a German victory.
 
Between 1885 and 1944 Bulgaria could be said to be a Russian ally only between 1903 and 1913. During the rest of time relations varied from indifferent to outright hostile. The reason why no troops were sent on the Eastern Front was that such a move would have been enormously unpopular, even while the Bulgarian leadership probably hoped for a German victory.
I actually meant to ask your opinion. Do you think Bulgaria would had been significantly affected early on in a TL where Turkey lost the Greek-Turkish war? As you can see so far I have played it mostly safe following OTL, the only significant difference is the 1925 incident being less embarrassing for the Greeks. Obviously TTL Bulgaria and Turkey do not share a border and will likely find common ground against Greece.
 
Obviously, you 're more familiar with the Bulgarian affairs.
What I 've read (unfortunately, can't remember where) is not that Bulgaria was alligned with the Russian/Soviet policies, but that the Russian influence on the Bulgarian people was really strong. Afterall, it's not that Bulgaria did not participate in Barbarossa; didn't even nominally declare war.
Anyhow, ITTL things so far go as per OTL. Let's see if Earl Marshall will stir things up!
 
I actually meant to ask your opinion. Do you think Bulgaria would had been significantly affected early on in a TL where Turkey lost the Greek-Turkish war? As you can see so far I have played it mostly safe following OTL, the only significant difference is the 1925 incident being less embarrassing for the Greeks. Obviously TTL Bulgaria and Turkey do not share a border and will likely find common ground against Greece.
First of all, I imagine Greece would not have staged an invasion of Bulgaria in 1925 as they did in OTL, since they would have more pressing concerns and no need to restore national honor. Secondly, there would be some demographic shifts. Greece would probably more strongly "encourage" the Bulgarians remaining in Greece, since without the huge wave of refugees from Asia Minor they would have a proportionally higher share of population. Bulgaria meanwhile would do the same to the Greeks still living in Bulgaria (though even in OTL nearly all of them left) due to them being concentrated close to the new border with Greece. Also, with no border with Turkey anymore, the Turkish government might encourage the Bulgarian Turks to leave, since there would be no point in attempting to use them to influence Bulgaria. Though alternatively, depending on the situation in Turkey there might be even less emigration if Turkey is unable to absorb them.

Otherwise there shouldn't be any significant changes, at least until If (or when) a Second World War breaks out.
 
Another question is whether ther are any changes in the relationship between Greece and Yugoslavia.
In OTL Pangalos as a dictator, offer co-sovereignty at the port of Thessaloniki, in an effort to secure the Yugoslav support. What about TTL?
 
@Dementor You got the non invasion but in OTL the Bulgarians got war reparations of that war and ITTL they have to pay both Greece and Yugoslavia and also got humiliated a bit so that should have an impact in the political scene of the state. I feel for a communist takeover just for some spice in Balkans cause we have a Republic in Greece a Constitutional monarchy in both Romania and Yugoslavia so a communist state there could be interesting but I don't know if it is plausible.

Merry Christmas to everyone!!!
 
Another question is whether ther are any changes in the relationship between Greece and Yugoslavia.
In OTL Pangalos as a dictator, offer co-sovereignty at the port of Thessaloniki, in an effort to secure the Yugoslav support. What about TTL?
There have been changes in comparison to OTL. Greece has been in a far stronger position militarily and politically in addition to being under Venizelos who was well respected and liked in Belgrade. So TTL the proposals for a Balkan Entente between Greece, Yugoslavia and Romania that were circulating in 1919-20 have actually come to fruition. Relating to Thessaloniki, Yugoslavia has likely been given a free zone in the port, but that's largely along the 1929-30 agreements of OTL...

@Dementor You got the non invasion but in OTL the Bulgarians got war reparations of that war and ITTL they have to pay both Greece and Yugoslavia and also got humiliated a bit so that should have an impact in the political scene of the state. I feel for a communist takeover just for some spice in Balkans cause we have a Republic in Greece a Constitutional monarchy in both Romania and Yugoslavia so a communist state there could be interesting but I don't know if it is plausible.

Merry Christmas to everyone!!!
The reparations at a state level are largely negligible materially, though obviously important politically. I did actually toy with the idea of the Agrarians surviving TTL with communist support but I couldn't see how they could survive the army/IMRO. The communists on their own even if they managed to take over the country which I find unlikely, it most likely would had resulted to at a minimum Yugoslav invasion, with France and Britain cheering them along, we are still in 1924/25 after all...
 
Part 30 A revolt and a fair
Syria, July 1925

France following the end of the war with Turkey in 1921 had reduced the Army of the Levant to a little over 14,000 regulars and about 8,000 auxiliaries [1] most of them coming from Syria's minorities. This given the treatment Syria was so far receiving and the fighting that had already taken place in 1920 was perhaps ill advised. Syria had been split in 6 autonomous states [2] much to the discomfort of Syrian nationalists and perhaps worse Syrian elites had seen their rights and prerogatives reduced compared to Ottoman times. Things would finally come to a head when the mandate's high commissioner general Maurice Sarrail, not the most diplomatic of men as he had proven to the allied detriment during his time as commander of the Macedonian front during the Great War, threw to jail a Druze delegation that had come to Beirut to petition him. The Druze were the first to revolt under the command of Sultan Al-Atrash, by August after Al-Atrash had scored his first victories against the French colonial forces and French troops were forced to retreat from Druze territory, the revolt would spread like wildfire to the rest of Syria. Hame would be the next to revolt in August [3] under Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, a former Ottoman officer, who left his position in the French colonial army to lead the rebels. By September the rebels would lead a major assault against Damascus, which Sarrail's troops beat back while thanks to Al-Qawuqji's contacts in the Turkish army, Syria's Turkish minority would join the rebellion and arms and volunteers would be smuggled over the border. There would be some notable exceptions to participation to the rebellion though. Greater Lebanon, dominated by the Maronites, remained allied to France and so did the Kurds, particularly after attacks by Turkish and Arab rebels against Kurdish villages. The Alawites would prove initially more ambivalent but the same dynamic that had brought the Kurds on the French side would help to secure Alawite support as well as attacks on largely Alawite French colonial troops spilt to attacks on civilians as well despite efforts by rebel commanders to control things.

Black Sea, August 1925

The first major manoeuvres of the Soviet Black Sea fleet in several years took place, including testing landing operations of 2 naval infantry battalions of the 51st infantry division. Much like the simultaneous manoeuvres of the Baltic fleet they left much to be desired. The Soviet fleet lacked in training and organization and not least was much inferior in material, both in the Baltic and the Black sea. In the Baltic the pair of refurbished dreadnoughts available were hardly sufficient to deal with the British or the French, though at least provided enough of a deterrent against local powers. If anything things were far worse in the Black sea. The British presence in Constantinople was a dagger pointed straight at Ukraine. And the single cruiser and 5 destroyers of the fleet were far inferior even to the Greek navy at the moment. Come Autumn Kliment Voroshilov, who had replaced Frunze after his accidental (officially at least) death in a routine surgery, would receive requests from the navy for immediate measures to strengthen the fleet. But the proposals would be strongly opposed by the army under Tuchachevskii.

Thessaloniki, October 1925

Eleutherios Venizelos opened in person the city's first international trade fair. Since the idea had been first aired the previous year significant effort had been part in international participation to the fair, the only countries notably absent were Turkey, Bulgaria and the Soviet Union. Venizelos would take advantage of the opportunity to announce that work would begin to establish the country's third university in the city, but what would mostly remain in people's memory from the fair was Christos Tsigiridis opening Greece's and the Balkans first radio station for the occasion. Overall the fair could be deemed a success helping the city's further growth. Thessaloniki was a city in flux after the 1917 fire and the exchange of populations. The Hebrard urban plan was being strictly followed, ideas to split up the about 1,300 new holdings in the city centre had been rejected by the government out of hand. Some 33,000 Greek and Armenian refugees had taken the place of the city's 46,000 Muslims while Thessaloniki also remained home to a strong Jewish community of over 60,000 people nearly 37% of the 161,000 people of the city after the population exchange which was increasingly assimilating to Greece [4]. Not all was rosy for the city of course. Thessaloniki was only a distant third behind Athens and Smyrna in population, the two cities had slightly over 450,000 and 370,000 people respectively and this inevitably affected her influence within Greece and the attention it was receiving by everyone, including the government. And while its Jewish community was generally assimilating to Greece some friction inevitably existed. Part of it was politics as the community since 1915 tended to support the Royalist parties, first Gounaris Populists and in the last election, Stratos Conservative Reformists. Part of it was problems over the fate of the old Jewish cemetery of Thessaloniki, one of the world's largest with about half a million tombs, which while initially off the city walls the growth of the city in the previous century had effectively brought in her very centre. The city council wanted to remove the cemetery, with land provided for a new one. But from the Jewish point of view this was highly problematic as for religious reasons moving the tombs was unacceptable making a compromise difficult...

Kayseri, October 1925

Operation of the TOMTAS aircraft factory begun. The first aircraft to be built would be a FIAT BR.3, ostensibly unarmed and for postal service use, in total some 65 BR.3s and Junkers A20s would be assembled by the factory over the next couple of years. How seriously the non militarized part was being taken by anyone was open to question. What was certain was that the Greek counterpart of TOMTAS in Phaleron, near Athens had already begun construction of 100 Breguet 19s for the Greek army's Air service along with a smaller number of Blackburn Velos for the Naval Air Service... [5]

Sivas, December 1925


The German Julius Berger Tiefbau gained the Turkish contracts for the construction of new railroads that would connect Sivas with the existing railway network and the sea. A 409km line from Sivas to Kayseri and from there to the existing Baghdad railroad to the north of Mersin would be built first giving Sivas an outlet to the Mediterranean. A second 380 km line would connect Kayseri to Ankara. Last a 402 km line between Sivas and Samsun would give the temporary capital an outlet to the Black sea. An 120 million Reichsmark credit agreement between the Deutsche Orient Bank of Berlin and the Turkish state would provide financing for the initiation of the project.


[1] That's slightly larger than the ~6,000 of OTL. The additional numbers are mostly Kurds from the additional territory France retained in 1921 as well as the Kurdish statelet in created in North Syria.
[2] Including Rojava /Kurdish region TTL
[3] The Syrians have been alienated even more TTL due to the creation of a Kurdish state as well, so the revolt spreads even faster.
[4] No different than OTL besides tensions in Thessaloniki between the Jewish community and the refugees being relatively lower, as the number of refugees is one third that of OTL and they are far better off economically.
[5] One difference from OTL is Venizelos forcing the army to also use the Phaleron aircraft factory, in OTL initially the army did not want to use it because it had been created by the navy...
 
Will the Armenians-in-exile form their own unit in the Greek Armed Forces? - I'm almost imagening: starting with a company and one pilot in the end of the 1920's; an regiment and a squadron in mid-1930's; and a division and a air group (of three squadrons) in the end of the 1930's
 
I feel like this Syrian revolt will lead to more prominent minorities , looking at you Maronites and Kurds , cause the French will stop this rebellion and they are going to support all the minorities that didn't revolt. Syria could become a federation of different groups in the future not a centralized state but will see about that.

I like the idea of an Armenian regiment in the Greek Army ,as well as a Jewish one but that didn't happen OTL so I doubt it would ITTL. How are the Greek railroads coming? I remember it was commented upon where the end rails would be but I can't recall the plans put ahead. Also another loan for the Turks eh? Can't see that going well for them in light of the looming depression.
 
Will the Armenians-in-exile form their own unit in the Greek Armed Forces? - I'm almost imagening: starting with a company and one pilot in the end of the 1920's; an regiment and a squadron in mid-1930's; and a division and a air group (of three squadrons) in the end of the 1930's
Greece was strongly assimilationist at the time. Separate ethnic military units, designed as such, would go against that. Besides it would be viewed by the Soviets as an act targeting them and the Soviets are already paranoid enough about Greece without Greece giving them fresh reasons to be...

I feel like this Syrian revolt will lead to more prominent minorities , looking at you Maronites and Kurds , cause the French will stop this rebellion and they are going to support all the minorities that didn't revolt. Syria could become a federation of different groups in the future not a centralized state but will see about that.
If anything the Great Syrian revolt TTL is going to be worse from France here, in OTL the Syrians did not have Turkish officers pissed off at France slipping arms and men to them...

I like the idea of an Armenian regiment in the Greek Army ,as well as a Jewish one but that didn't happen OTL so I doubt it would ITTL.
As mentioned above there are serious political reasons against this as well. On the other hand the Greek army still recruits locally. So if there are areas with heavy Jewish or Armenian populations de facto you also get heavily ethnic units. Which is how you've got the 50th Infantry regiment, which was recruiting from Thessaloniki, in OTL being nicknamed the Cohen brigade. TTL you'll also get a notable influx of Circassians in cavalry units.

How are the Greek railroads coming? I remember it was commented upon where the end rails would be but I can't recall the plans put ahead. Also another loan for the Turks eh? Can't see that going well for them in light of the looming depression.
Turkey in OTL took quite a few short term loans, mostly financing railroad construction and railroad nationalization, the financial effort placed on both was rather huge for the size of the Turkish economy of the time. Nationalizations alone cost about 24.2 million pounds and the new railroads built must have cost something around 39.3 million more.
 
If anything the Great Syrian revolt TTL is going to be worse from France here, in OTL the Syrians did not have Turkish officers pissed off at France slipping arms and men to them...
Could this end up with butterflies on french colonial policy? IIRC in OTL there was a period of "liberalisation" after the Great Revolt, but the French kept arbitrarily intervening in the country's politics. Would a more serious scare during the revolt push them to a more diplomatic approach?
 
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