Nobunaga’s Ambition Realized: Dawn of a New Rising Sun

Any changes in Philippine? Also I am surprised Japanese not tried to expand Mercantile interest towards india.
The Philippines has stayed mostly the same except less Japanese because no diaspora of Kirishitans. Japanese trade will eventually expand to India, the realm just needs to have enough economic and political power projection closer to home first.
The Ryukyu Islands, Guam, Midway, Carolina and Mariana Islands, Kurils, Sakhalin, Aleutians.
For now, the Ryukyu Kingdom is kinda in both the Japanese and Ming spheres of influence, so Japan would take Ming retaliation if they take further steps. As of now, the Ryukyu Kingdom becoming a direct tributary, vassal, or protectorate is very unlikely and there is chance that Okinawa never becomes Japanese.
 
For now, the Ryukyu Kingdom is kinda in both the Japanese and Ming spheres of influence, so Japan would take Ming retaliation if they take further steps. As of now, the Ryukyu Kingdom becoming a direct tributary, vassal, or protectorate is very unlikely and there is chance that Okinawa never becomes Japanese.
The Ming are gonna die eventually and when they do nothing stops Japan taking full control of the Ryukyu.
 
The Ming are gonna die eventually and when they do nothing stops Japan taking full control of the Ryukyu.
Yeah I totally agree China when weak always neglects it's navy so it'd not care that a bunch of islands got snatched by the Japanese. Also that the ryukyus are an en route to Beiritou so preventing Chinese influence from reaching the ryukyus is a must.
 
Yeah I totally agree China when weak always neglects it's navy so it'd not care that a bunch of islands got snatched by the Japanese. Also that the ryukyus are an en route to Beiritou so preventing Chinese influence from reaching the ryukyus is a must.
Precisely. There’s no point controlling Taiwan if they don’t even control Senkaku
 
Chapter 31: Nobunori’s New and Proper Governance, The Calm Before the Storm

Chapter 31: Nobunori’s New and Proper Governance, The Calm Before the Storm


Nobutomo’s coup in 1619 not only swept Saito Yoshioki out of power but reduced the power of hereditary Oda retainers in Azuchi, with Nobunori taking more direct control of the government and Oda clan members and regional daimyo gaining greater influence over political affairs. Trade expansionist-minded Oda retainers were also promoted to an extent, most notably Mori Naritoshi who was appointed to the Sangi-shu and became one of the leading figures of the new administration. The position of inspector-general, while still important, would see its powers and influence considerably reduced to prevent another political usurpation from happening again. Additionally, under Yoshioki’s tyranny, while the realm had continued prospering and expanding economically, control over its peripheries and foreign policy needed much reinvigorating due to neglect and lack of interest. The next few years would see an effort to make up for the lost years.

Firstly, Nobunori promoted Ikeda Masatora (池田政虎), the 29 year old second son of the late Ikeda Terumasa, to the foreign affairs magistracy from his old position as Iriebashi urban magistrate. Being a full-time resident of Bireitou from a young age and fluent in Chinese, Masatora was naturally well-informed on the political and economic dynamics of east and southeast Asia and set a new course in Azuchi diplomacy. Under the advice of the shrewd magistrate, Nobunori sent embassies to Batavia, Manila, Ayutthaya, Dong Kinh, and Banda Aceh in the 1620s to establish firmer relations with European and Southeast Asian powers, and Azuchi even managed to organize a mission to Goa in 1626, marking Japan’s first serious interaction with the Indian subcontinent. The realm was also able to navigate difficult crises overseas, such as the Dutch-Ming war over the Pescadores between 1622 and 1624, damages caused by roaming samurai mercenaries in various conflicts, and tensions between Japan and Siam after the murder of Si Saowaphak in 1624 by anti-Japanese nobles in favor of his 13 year old son Athittayawong. Referring to Nobuhide the Younger’s writings, the various Nihonmachis throughout Southeast Asia were recognized politically as autonomous outposts of the realm and began to receive financial support, although arrangements differed by city based on size and relations with the on-site foreign government. Nobunori’s new foreign policy improved relations with the Iberian powers and especially Dai Viet, although in the long run the former never fully trusted the Japanese again and the Netherlands began to displace them as the pre-eminent European presence in the realm.​

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Portrait of Ikeda Masatora​

The Sangi-shu was also permanently expanded in size from 13-14 to a firm 15 members with the appointments of Kamakura Tandai Oda Toshimasa and Bireitou governor Oda Tadataka, both strengthening both the power of the Oda clan in political affairs and prestige and reasserting Azuchi influence over the Kanto region and Bireitou respectively. Closer to home, Nobunori also arranged a marriage between his eldest daughter Takahime (尊姫) and the emperor, strengthening Oda power in the imperial court on top of his second son Tomoshige becoming the heir of the Konoe family.

The change in governance also benefited the operations of the Azuchi navy, now headed by naval magistrate Kuki Moritaka (九鬼守隆). Saito Yoshioki’s lack of interest in trade resulted in temporary stagnation in naval expansion and activity, but this was quickly reversed after 1619. Organizationally, the Azuchi navy integrated the Kanto navy as its 5th sub-branch based from Shimoda (下田) alongside those in Iriebashi, Nagasaki, Kanazawa (金沢), and Hakodate as well as the central fleet in Hyogo (兵庫).​

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Drawing of Shimoda from the early 1600s​

Despite incidents and diplomatic tension with the Iberian powers, the Kirishitan population grew to around 10% in the 1620s, with the heaviest concentrations in northern Kyushu, and the Kinki region. Native Japanese priests, particularly outside of Kyushu, progressively began to distance themselves from the authority of European Jesuits and Franciscans due to the latter’s damaged reputation over the preceding decades, although no break on doctrine occurred. Knowledge of other non-Japanese religions began to spread in the realm, particularly through the various embassies in the 1620s. In one instance, Theravada Buddhist monks accompanied the Ayutthaya embassy on their journey back to Japan and subsequently took a tour of Kyoto’s temples and shrines and conversed with various Buddhist priests on their differing interpretations and applications of Gautama Buddha’s teachings. These interactions along with the successful embassy to Goa led to a new Japanese tradition of Buddhist pilgrimage to sites in India and Southeast Asia.​

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A Siamese statue of the Buddha gifted to Myoushin-ji Temple (妙心寺) in 1622​

The aftermath of the 1619 coup was marked by political revitalization on the domestic and international fronts. However, nothing could prevent one particular incident. On November 1626, while the Goa embassy was sailing back to Sakai, Tadataka’s adopted son Tadahide (織田忠秀) [1], who was in Iriebashi, received an urgent messenger with shocking and troubling news: a Spanish expedition had begun construction of a coastal fortress in southwestern Bireitou.

Crisis loomed large in the distance.

[1]: Tadahide is actually Oda Nobuhide’s biological son who was only 6 when his father died and was thus deemed too young to be appointed governor of the island. He is, however, Tadataka’s heir as Tadataka has no sons.​
 
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Damn! Nobunori has cemented his family's position as masters of Japan even more! A marriage with his daughter and the Emperor! The head honcho of the country couldnt be clearer. I'm sure he and his administration will brave the storm.
 
Damn! Nobunori has cemented his family's position as masters of Japan even more! A marriage with his daughter and the Emperor! The head honcho of the country couldnt be clearer. I'm sure he and his administration will brave the storm.

Agreed.

And while it’d be a challenge…Spain would be operating at a significant disadvantage. Very far from the homeland, takes months to get anywhere…if he was able to take out that outpost and secure any other ports they have in the region, he’d have months to prepare for the arrival of a major force.
 
Damn! Nobunori has cemented his family's position as masters of Japan even more! A marriage with his daughter and the Emperor! The head honcho of the country couldnt be clearer. I'm sure he and his administration will brave the storm.
A marriage between the Emperor and Nobunori’s daughter means the next emperor will be of the Oda clan not the Yamato clan. Could this be the end of the Yamato?

Also I wonder if the Dutch will help out the Japanese if this upcoming Bireitou crisis leads to a Spanish-Japanese War?
 
Probably the Spanish will get fucked over by the Japanese unless the Japanese really underperform considering the Japanese have the geographical advantages that even if Japanese ships are not as good they'd win.
 
Probably the Spanish will get fucked over by the Japanese unless the Japanese really underperform considering the Japanese have the geographical advantages that even if Japanese ships are not as good they'd win.
Yeah, I don't think the Japanese are going to put up with a Spanish presence in Bireitou.
 
Yeah, I don't think the Japanese are going to put up with a Spanish presence in Bireitou.
Yeah I agree totally. Japan will at most allow ships there but nothing more.

Speaking of religion how would Japanese culture affect Christianity? Like would Japanese gods become saints and Japanese style statues referencing saints be made and be known of in Europe? Also considering that the SEA would be influenced by Japan would parts of SEA just never convert into Islam?

I also hope Japan fully switches to hiragana in the 18-19th century.
 
A marriage between the Emperor and Nobunori’s daughter means the next emperor will be of the Oda clan not the Yamato clan. Could this be the end of the Yamato?

Also I wonder if the Dutch will help out the Japanese if this upcoming Bireitou crisis leads to a Spanish-Japanese War?
Nah - The Fujiwara did it, as well as the Tokugawa IOTL, and it still changed nothing to the fact that the the dynastic lineage belonged to that of the Yamato line.

That said - taking over the Konoe family meant that the Oda is poised to have a presence in the court nobility.

Also - I wonder what will be the prefix for Japan will be, like Sino- is for China and Anglo- for Britain.
 
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Nah - The Fujiwara did it, as well as the Tokugawa IOTL, and it still changed nothing to the fact that the the dynastic lineage belonged to that of the Yamato line.

That said - taking over the Konoe family meant that the Oda is poised to have a presence in the court nobility.

Also - I wonder what will be the prefix for Japan will be, like Sino- is for China and Anglo- for Britain.
Nippon? Or zipangu. Zipanguese as a name would be interesting.
 
One nitpick: Hanoi only become a name during the Nguyen Dynasty. In the 17th century it is popularly referred as Dong King or Eastern Capital.
 
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Speaking of religion how would Japanese culture affect Christianity? Like would Japanese gods become saints and Japanese style statues referencing saints be made and be known of in Europe? Also considering that the SEA would be influenced by Japan would parts of SEA just never convert into Islam?
IOTL many Kirishitans believed the kami were angels, and incorporated other aspects of Shinto and Buddhism into their faith IIRC.
 
A marriage between the Emperor and Nobunori’s daughter means the next emperor will be of the Oda clan not the Yamato clan. Could this be the end of the Yamato?
No, Japanese trace descent patrilineally. The Emperor marrying Nobunori's daughter gives the Imperial and Shogun families marriage ties but preserves the agnatic descent of the Yamato.
 
Will mahabodhi and sarnath restored? Any will there be any missionar activities in india?

Any chances of mahasangati in japan with Mahayana and theravada in attendance?
Barring major changes, restorations will happen but major changes in Japanese Buddhism will take a few decades if they were to happen.
Yeah I agree totally. Japan will at most allow ships there but nothing more.

Speaking of religion how would Japanese culture affect Christianity? Like would Japanese gods become saints and Japanese style statues referencing saints be made and be known of in Europe? Also considering that the SEA would be influenced by Japan would parts of SEA just never convert into Islam?

I also hope Japan fully switches to hiragana in the 18-19th century.
Because Japan doesn't have a religious agenda, it would take the confluence of multiple Buddhist powers to really shake up the Islamization of Southeast Asia, if anything Japan's religious makeup will be affected more. The evolution of Japanese Christianity is less determined at this point because 1. Christianity is still growing without much restriction, and 2. Jesuits and Franciscans are still influential enough to not force a break in doctrine.

I don't foresee Japan fully dumping hiragana, maybe a hiragana-katakana dual system but it would take a lot for kanji to just go away.
One nitpick: Hanoi only become a name during the Nguyen Dynasty. In the 17th century it is popularly referred as Dong King or Eastern Capital.
Will fix, thanks for the heads up.
Nippon? Or zipangu. Zipanguese as a name would be interesting.
For the purposes of the timeline, Japan and Japanese are the terms to avoid confusion but ITTL both Nipponese and Japanese are contenders for a modern day term.
IOTL many Kirishitans believed the kami were angels, and incorporated other aspects of Shinto and Buddhism into their faith IIRC.
A lot of that was because of the isolation of Kakure Kirishitans from the rest of Christendom, that particular sect of "Catholics" diverged significantly from Christianity.
 
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