Nintendo's New Groove: An Alternate Nintendo Timeline

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The Beginning of a New Groove
Somewhere, in the early 1980s, Atari and Nintendo had plans for releasing the Famicom outside of Japan. But due to some unfortunate setbacks such as the Great Video Game Crash of 1983, something involving Coleco showing a demonstration of a prototype of Donkey Kong for its forthcoming Coleco Adam home computer system in the CES, and a failed contract, things fell apart, but luckily for Nintendo, they managed to release the Famicom outside of Japan in 1985, and it was named the “Nintendo Entertainment System”. Because of that, the world wasn’t the same thanks to the release of the NES.

Now, in our timeline, we are all impressed by Nintendo’s legacy after the release of the NES, even with some mishaps along the way, and it’s very weird…

But however, what if Atari and Nintendo actually managed to release the Famicom outside of Japan? If we were to do that, here are four ideas I had in mind.:
  1. Coleco shows a demonstration of a different game that isn’t Donkey Kong for its forthcoming Coleco Adam home computer system in the CES
  2. Atari creates the pat-pended Atari Seal of Quality, which’ll later on be known as the Atari-Nintendo Seal of Quality, and then the Nintendo Seal of Quality (as a result of what’s to come)
  3. The 1983 video game crash is prevented by actual good copies of Pac-Man being released and E.T. not getting a video game adaptation (at the time).
    However, Pac-Man’s prototypes (Pac-Man for the Atari 2600 IOTL) and E.T. 's Atari 2600 games are found in the future (through Atari’s vault) and lead to a cult following.
    Along with that, some gaming consoles get discontinued, a few games were either retooled or cancelled (due to that aforementioned Seal of Quality, that is), and of course, the sales between console gaming and computer gaming are very equal.
  4. Oh! And Atari was bought by someone other than Warner.

And on a side-note, the SwordQuest competition ended up becoming successful thanks to no 1983 video game crash ITTL. Therefore, all four games get released in time. We all don’t know who the winners are, but that’s a story for another time.

And thus, Atari and Nintendo actually managed to release the Famicom outside of Japan! However, it had to be renamed to the “Atari-Nintendo Advanced Video System”. It was released in Autumn of 1984. Even if it’s released, the Atari 2600 is still on sale until it ceases production in the year 1986.

Should I explain some details about the Atari-Nintendo Advanced Video System? Please stay tuned.
 
The Atari-Nintendo Advanced Video System

The Atari-Nintendo Advanced Video System
Released in: Autumn of 1984
This is the Atari-Nintendo Advanced Video System, or ANAVS for short. This is like OTL’s Nintendo Entertainment System, except with more add-ons from the Famicom console, and those innovative wireless controllers! No strings attached, y’all! The following launch titles include:
  1. Baseball
  2. Donkey Kong
  3. Donkey Kong 3
  4. Donkey Kong Jr.
  5. Donkey Kong Jr. Math
  6. Duck Hunt
  7. Golf
  8. Hogan’s Alley
  9. Mario Bros.
  10. Nintendo BASIC (Known as Family BASIC in Japan)
  11. Pinball
  12. Popeye
  13. Popeye’s English Play
  14. Sky Skipper (IOTL, Sky Skipper wasn’t released on the Famicom/NES)
  15. Tennis
  16. Wild Gunman
Overall, the reception of the ANAVS is the same as OTL’s reception of the NES. Thus, Nintendo has struck gold thanks to their efforts with Atari!

As for the price, how much does the ANAVS cost? $179 for the Deluxe Set.

After the ANAVS’s launch, a few more games were released for this system, especially Lode Runner. Yes, Hudson Soft released Lode Runner for this 8-Bit gaming console, just like OTL.

Also, here are some of the two boxarts shown ITTL.

Also, as for the ratings? It'll be like the ESRB ratings, except for the Atari-Nintendo Advanced Video System. Here's how the age ratings work.:
  • G Rating (General Audience) - Just like the ESRB's E Rating.
  • PG Rating (Parental Guidance Audience) - Just like the ESRB's E+10 Rating.
  • PG-13 Rating (Parental Guidance Audience Over 13) - Just like the ESRB's T Rating.
  • M Rating (Mature Audience Over 18) - Just like the ESRB's M Rating.
And here’s the logo.:

Stay tuned for what 1985 has to offer!

NOW YOU’RE PLAYING WITH POWER!
 
I commend your photopaint, you're doing the effort...still i've zero faith on atari would not fumble the famicom but well not bad work so far
 
Just to see if Atari and Nintendo can make this partnership work. I genuinely liked what they were trying to do with the Jaguar and the cancelled Panther and I'd like to see those consoles get a good run.
Jaguar and Panther are butterfly away, as either tramiel don't get atari, he will not buy the british flare techologies, plus those consoles were massive POS inferior even the SNES at the time
 
1985: Hey Paisanos!
The year is 1985. Known for releasing some hit games on the ANAVS. The following include Pac-Man, Ice Climber, Balloon Fight, Urban Champion, Excitebike, Gyromite, Stack-Up, Wrecking Crew, Mach Rider, Bomberman, and more. However, there was one game that stands out from the bunch, and that game is called…
That’s right, Super Mario Bros.! This is the game that was a sleeper hit for the ANAVS! The ANAVS was selling like hot cakes thanks to this game. There’s a bonus, in one of the re-releases of this game, it’s even packed in with Duck Hunt!
 
That’s right, Super Mario Bros.! This is the game that was a sleeper hit for the ANAVS! The ANAVS was selling like hot cakes thanks to this game. There’s a bonus, in one of the re-releases of this game, it’s even packed in with Duck Hunt!
Now I wonder the side effect launching the famicom a whole year early...as that might not change superfamicom timetable, others might...NEC and Sega would
 
If Warner didn’t buy Atari, who did? There wasn’t a lot of takers and everyone turned down Bushnell until Manny Gerard at Warner got interested.

Atari needed hundreds of millions dollars to launch the VCS in ‘77 and it’s not easy to find a company that would buy them and then invest that much.

(Companies that turned down Atari: Disney, MCA, National Semiconductor, at least one major toy company, etc…)
 
If Warner didn’t buy Atari, who did?
Good question. You can find out who bought Atari in this little AU of mine.
There wasn’t a lot of takers and everyone turned down Bushnell until Manny Gerard at Warner got interested.

Atari needed hundreds of millions dollars to launch the VCS in ‘77 and it’s not easy to find a company that would buy them and then invest that much.

(Companies that turned down Atari: Disney, MCA, National Semiconductor, at least one major toy company, etc…)
As for what you said, I see what you mean. If Atari is bought by some company, it'll make a difference in a timeline. But hey, that's life.
 
1986: The Disk System Cometh
The year is 1986, where Nintendo releases a new add-on for the Famicom in Japan. It’s called the Famicom Disk System.
Released on February 21, 1986, this peripheral for the Famicom uses proprietary floppy disks called "Disk Cards" for cheaper data storage and it adds a new high-fidelity sound channel for supporting FDS games. Plus, the mascot for the FDS is Diskun.


Plus, notable games released for this system are The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, The Mysterious Murasame Castle, Castlevania, Pro Wrestling, Kid Icarus, Volleyball, Super Mario Bros. Plus (a combination of OTL’s Super Mario Bros. (FDS) and Super Mario Bros. 2 (the Japanese version in which we call “The Lost Levels” outside of Japan)), Zanac, and Stinger. However, the Famicom Disk System wasn’t released outside of Japan, but some games get released in cartridge form outside of Japan later on.

Funnily enough, it is also the same year that a certain movie based off of the Super Mario Bros. game on the ANAVS came out. That movie is known as…
Super Mario Bros.: The Great Mission to Rescue Princess Peach! Released in Japan on July 20, 1986. Since Nintendo is involved with this, it gave Nintendo an opportunity to work on a Super Mario anime series. However, an English dub for that movie has not been made until 1989…

Also, the Atari 2600 ceases production that year. That is all.
 
Along with that, some gaming consoles get discontinued, a few games were either retooled or cancelled (due to that aforementioned Seal of Quality, that is), and of course, the sales between console gaming and computer gaming are very equal.
Curious question. How do bad Licensed Video Games and Crappy Video Games become Original video game with original characters similar to how Journey to Silius went from Terminator to original game called Journey to Silius or Sunman went from Superman to Sunman, Crappy Video games changed into Good Games Respectively?
Just leave the Good Licensed Video games such as DuckTales (NES) alone.
 
Curious question. How do bad Licensed Video Games and Crappy Video Games become Original video game with original characters similar to how Journey to Silius went from Terminator to original game called Journey to Silius or Sunman went from Superman to Sunman, Crappy Video games changed into Good Games Respectively?
Just leave the Good Licensed Video games such as DuckTales (NES) alone.
Well, good question. The answer is that sometimes if a licensed game is good, it'll be released. Though sometimes, not all bad video games get changed into good video games. There always has to be a dud somewhere.

And yes, the good licensed video games such as DuckTales (NES) will be spared.
 
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