When Napoleon escaped from Elba and returned to France in 1815, his brother Joseph advised him to appoint their younger brother Lucien as governor of Corsica, which is where Napoleon and his family came from. Lucien would thus have been in that position when Napoleon was defeated at Waterloo.

If Lucien had gone to Corsica, he would still have remained master of the Island, and what resources would it not have presented to our persecuted patriots? To how many unfortunate families would not Corsica have afforded an asylum? [Napoleon] repeated that he had perhaps committed a fault, at the time of his abdication, in not reserving to himself the sovereignty of Corsica, together with the possession of some millions of the civil list; and in not having conveyed all his valuables to Toulon, whence nothing could have impeded his passage. In Corsica, he would have found himself at home; the whole population would have been, as it were, his own family. He might have disposed of every arm and every heart. Thirty thousand or even 50,000 allied troops could not have subdued him.
was it possible for Napoleon to have defended Corsica as kind of a giant Elba?

And if not, on the second scenario the text supposes, had Lucien been appointed Governor of Corsica on the 100 days, would it have been possible for the Bonapartes to remain in control of Corsica after the 100 days? Or would the Allies have forced an invasion of the island nevertheless?
 
I expect the Allies will force the issue, having had the example of Elba already.
Where something like this might have worked was the first time around.
 
I expect the Allies will force the issue, having had the example of Elba already.
Where something like this might have worked was the first time around.
In the case of the first time around, I thought of using the Polish-Saxon crisis to flare up and distract the Allies' attention from Napoleonic Corsica, but whether or not Napoleon and his troops can survive approximately a year of guerilla warfare against the British and the Bourbons until the Crisis flares up remains to be seen...
 


I would say improbable, Corsica had been annexed directly to metropolitan France (even if it was a region in full ferment of a possible revolt) but if we go with Napoleon exiled to his native home, it offers interesting ideas for what could happen in Sardinia (Napoleon tries the coup and tries to unify the two islands, the Sardinians would be more than happy to expel the Savoys from the island, Otl almost did it in 1797 by making them flee a Cagliari in revolt, to then return with the army to quell the city) but given the links between the two languages (Sardinian and Corsican are enough intelligible, indeed according to some linguists the dialects of northern Sardinia (Sassari and surroundings) are of Corsican origin, only Gallurese is considered the true Sardinian language (without too many external influences) without forgetting that during the Genoese control of the two islands the Judicate of Torres ( my place of origin ) had important interests in the opposite island
 
The assertion that "Thirty thousand or even 50,000 allied troops could not have subdued him" seems questionable given that fewer than 30,000 were entirely sufficient to subdue the island in 1769 - and without any prolonged guerilla war, either. Aside from a very minor localized uprising in 1774, the French conquest of Corsica met little opposition after the military defeat of Paoli's forces in 1769. Did Napoleon, who had not been on Corsica for many years and had barely concerned himself with the island once he ruled France, really command more devotion than the "father of the nation" Pasquale Paoli? I think not. And the notion that "whole population would have been... his own family" is almost laughable; Corsica was notoriously a fractious clan society, and even Paoli had internal enemies that could not be overcome even by his personality or appeals to national unity. There will certainly be local factions opposing the Bonapartes who will be happy to support the island's (re-)annexation to France or some other power, particularly given that the transformation of Corsica into a Bonapartist pariah state is likely to destroy the economy. Even if the coalition doesn't want to invade for some reason, they can certainly spare a few frigates for a blockade.
 
The assertion that "Thirty thousand or even 50,000 allied troops could not have subdued him" seems questionable given that fewer than 30,000 were entirely sufficient to subdue the island in 1769 - and without any prolonged guerilla war, either. Aside from a very minor localized uprising in 1774, the French conquest of Corsica met little opposition after the military defeat of Paoli's forces in 1769. Did Napoleon, who had not been on Corsica for many years and had barely concerned himself with the island once he ruled France, really command more devotion than the "father of the nation" Pasquale Paoli? I think not. And the notion that "whole population would have been... his own family" is almost laughable; Corsica was notoriously a fractious clan society, and even Paoli had internal enemies that could not be overcome even by his personality or appeals to national unity. There will certainly be local factions opposing the Bonapartes who will be happy to support the island's (re-)annexation to France or some other power, particularly given that the transformation of Corsica into a Bonapartist pariah state is likely to destroy the economy. Even if the coalition doesn't want to invade for some reason, they can certainly spare a few frigates for a blockade.
So in other words, Bonapartist copium
 
People forgot one thing, Napoleon disliked Corsica after his family must fled the island in June 1793. The ennemies of his family loot his family house, almost killed him severals times and wanted to slaughter all his family.

He returned to the island only once in his life, but only because some wrong winds forced his small flotilla coming from the Egypt to seek refuge in Ajaccio.
 
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