Motorised bicycles encouraged.

Suppose in the immediate post war years the British government took steps to encourage the use of bolt on motors on push bikes. For a start they are no longer considered as motorbikes so need not be registered or pay vehicle excise duty. You also no longer need a licence or to buy insurance. How does traffic policy change with potentially hundreds of thousands or even millions of these contraptions taking people to and from work every day?

 
Suppose in the immediate post war years the British government took steps to encourage the use of bolt on motors on push bikes. For a start they are no longer considered as motorbikes so need not be registered or pay vehicle excise duty. You also no longer need a licence or to buy insurance. How does traffic policy change with potentially hundreds of thousands or even millions of these contraptions taking people to and from work every day?

I remember when I was really young, seeing similar rigs occasionally in my area after the oil crisis hit in the 1970's... I thought they were a great idea...
With millions of 'em in use though, basically unregulated, it would probably only be a matter of time before most states would step in with some regulation - requiring licenses, registration, basic safety features of some sort not typically found on bicycles.
Also, assuming that the overwhelming majority would be 2-cycle engines for less weight and more power-per-weight, hydrocarbon emissions would begin to be an issue with millions of 'em in use.
 

Nick P

Donor
After the first dozen accidents car owners and pedestrians will be screaming for these machines to be insured and regulated properly. The British Govt will eventually look for a way to make money out of these in the form of an annual licence, possibly one that includes basic insurance.

By the 70s there will be a safety campaign for riders to wear helmets and fit lights. By the late 80s the fumes will lead to a push for cleaner running, better economy and drive the market towards electric motors.
 
After the first dozen accidents car owners and pedestrians will be screaming for these machines to be insured and regulated properly. The British Govt will eventually look for a way to make money out of these in the form of an annual licence, possibly one that includes basic insurance.

By the 70s there will be a safety campaign for riders to wear helmets and fit lights. By the late 80s the fumes will lead to a push for cleaner running, better economy and drive the market towards electric motors.
So do you think that in this case the notorious Sinclair C5 would be an electric bike rather than a trike(and death trap) and actually successful? There was a lot of hype in the run up to its launch and when people actually saw the thing they couldn't believe it was so bad. The thing was supposed to be the future of urban transport.


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By the 70s there will be a safety campaign for riders to wear helmets and fit lights. By the late 80s the fumes will lead to a push for cleaner running, better economy and drive the market towards electric motors.
So do you think that in this case the notorious Sinclair C5 would be an electric bike rather than a trike(and death trap) and actually successful? There was a lot of hype in the run up to its launch and when people actually saw the thing they couldn't believe it was so bad. The thing was supposed to be the future of urban transport.


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And don't forget, it was so underpowered, you had to use the pedal assist for slight hills
Only 250Watts.
In the Late '80s, I was doing radio control boats and cars with more power.
The little pink Barbie Car for kids had that much power

Electrics just aren't there until Lead-Acid and Ni-Cads are supplanted by NiMh that had both the capacity and light weight, and 'smart' chargers to take the guesswork, and overcharging of batteries , out of the picture
 
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