Miscellaneous <1900 (Alternate) History Thread

i was actually thinking about writing a TL in which the Nizari Ismaili state in Masyaf survives, and slowly conquers the Levant.

For those who do not know, the Nizari Ismaili State of Masyaf is the direct historical inspiration for the Assassins Creed.
 
i was actually thinking about writing a TL in which the Nizari Ismaili state in Masyaf survives, and slowly conquers the Levant.

For those who do not know, the Nizari Ismaili State of Masyaf is the direct historical inspiration for the Assassins Creed.
That sounds very interesting, if you're willing I'd read it.
 

Bytor

Monthly Donor
TL;DR: Could Charles XII won the Great Northern War without giving up Northern Livonia to Peter the Great?

Not sure if this is relevant, but is there any way that Charles XII could have won the Great Northern War (1700-1721)? I’ve thought that maybe if he had pursued Russia instead of the PLC after the Russian army was crushed in the battle of Narva that Peter would have surrendered and, well, be honest, Augustus II wouldn’t stand a chance at Charles XII in his prime and no allies, or would he have had to agreed to the peace that Peter the Great presented to him where he got to keep Northern Livonia to be able to win. Just a question that’s been rattling in my brain for a while.
Yes, chase after Peter the Great at Narva.

Swedish forces through out this war show the ability many times over to win against forces 2x to 4x their in the middle of winter, so it's no stretch to think that if C12 had chased PtG after Narva, like at least some of his generals wanted, that it would have been the end of PtG.

See my "I want Charles in Charge of Me" thread. https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/i-want-charles-in-charge-of-me.414828/
 
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More pro-scientific Ancient Rome? (Ancient Rome wasn't as pro-scientific as Ancient Greece was. Why? Could this have been avoided?)
 
Slavery was also a in Ancient Greece...
But the problem was far worse in Ancient Rome?
The great estates became worked by slaves, leading to the landowning peasants flocking to the cities as cheap labour. So you have something of a double whammy against the need or impetus for technological solutions to problems as both country and city have masses of cheap labour available.
 
nearly ASB alt history exercise. IOTL nearly every monarch of europe recognized the Ottoman's claim as Caesars of Rome. What if the Pope in 1453 also recognized the Ottomans as the Caesars of Rome? What would be the political and geopolitical effects of that?
 
How far back is it plausible to isolate urea from urine as Herman Boerhaave did in the early 18th century? According to Wikipedia, his process was:
  1. Boiled off water, resulting in a substance similar to fresh cream
  2. Used filter paper to squeeze out remaining liquid
  3. Waited a year for solid to form under an oily liquid
  4. Removed the oily liquid
  5. Dissolved the solid in water
  6. Used recrystallization to tease out the urea
This sounds like something that could have been discovered centuries before by medieval science in the Islamic world or elsewhere. Urea's main use is as a fertiliser or ingredient in fertiliser, but it's also used as an ingredient in a variety of soaps, skin medicine, etc. I believe it is also useful as a precursor chemical so a variety of other discoveries might be made earlier OTL, human and animal urine was of course used for a variety of purposes such as tanning or night soil, but early urea production would presumably be better as it offers a more concentrated (and hygenic) form of one of the active ingredients.

Is early isolation and early industry (like historic potash production) producing urea plausible? If so, how early can we push this back to? Late Middle Ages or earlier? What would the effects be?
 
General monarchy question. I know young would-be kings, queens, emperors, and empresses would have a regent rule in their stead until they came of age. What, generally speaking, was that age, especially in the West circa the nineteenth century? Would it have been 18, or was a different age generally considered to mark adulthood and thus the ability to rule on their own? I'm specifically curious about France, if that changes anything, but I know there was never a time in the nineteenth century when one emperor took over directly from another, so I don't know how much precedent there is.
 
General monarchy question. I know young would-be kings, queens, emperors, and empresses would have a regent rule in their stead until they came of age. What, generally speaking, was that age, especially in the West circa the nineteenth century? Would it have been 18, or was a different age generally considered to mark adulthood and thus the ability to rule on their own? I'm specifically curious about France, if that changes anything, but I know there was never a time in the nineteenth century when one emperor took over directly from another, so I don't know how much precedent there is.
It varied from country to country and from regency to regency. Either 18 or 21 were common ages, though 19 was used a few times (apparently as a compromise between 18 and 21, in some cases). But the last proper regency in France, for the under-age Louis XV, lasted only until he was 13.
You could try looking through this list of regents: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_regents#Europe_2 for some more information.
 
What would be the best way for Deism to gain more of a following in the United States either before or during the American Revolution, enough to become a major religious category?
 
When the title Prince of Asturias (Príncipe de Asturias) was created in 1388, what if its territory included most of the rest of erstwhile Kingdom of León (particularly the OTL Spanish provinces of León and Zamora)?
 
Napoleonic wars question, In the peninsular wars, how many spanish soldiers had defected to King Joseph Bonaparte and gave loyalty to him and How many Spanish soldiers under Joseph's Kingdom served Spain under him.
 
If Peter III died in 1760 or whatever, before Tsar Elizabeth did. Who would she choose as heir?

"She held a negative opinion of King George and his diplomats, often treating them with contempt.[18] Nonetheless, the British crown still formally requested 20,000 troops in 1775[19] and sought an alliance.[20] She refused both pleas. Upon Spain's entry into the war, Britain once again turned to the Russian Empire, but this time, the English hoped for naval support. Catherine II once again ignored the British requests."

Also could this happen? Any timelines?
 
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