Medieval America Mark III

Whether or not the Youtube video is accurate, the "wheat and cattle to hogs and corn" is from White's site itself. The wide scale factor farming we see in present day America would not necessarily be the same in a non-Industrial setting, where technology, infrastructure, and even market demands would be different. Relatively little of the corn we grow is for direct consumption--a large amount is for syrup and animal feed, and in some cases it's used for things that have nothing to do eating. People eat less meat, drink no soda, and don't drive cars. The primary purpose of growing things is going to be for sustenance eating, so that means hardier crops which provide more calories, not treats. (I do think it's curious White doesn't mention potatoes--he might have intended to railroad in a blight so we wouldn't get a gamebreaker crop.) And pigs are also a somewhat more intensive animal in Medieval America, though I think to make it cleaner, the site does again put the thumb on the world and say almost half the continent considers eating swine to be taboo.

It should also be said that it would all be pretty gradual. It's not like you cross the Ohio or Delaware and suddenly people are growing corn instead of wheat, though again, sometimes culture will take a heavier hand in places.
 

Eparkhos

Gone Fishin'
Here's my first draft, I'll probably revise it later.

State of Tenasy (Tennisy/Tennessee)

(flag)

Government: Feudal State (tributary to Ohio)
Head of State: Governor (Nathan II York)
Population: 1,250,000
Religion: Non-Denominational Church (official); Evangelist, Syncretic Christianity (minority)
Totemic Symbol: Passion flower; Eagle with gloriole

(map)

Before the Regression, Tenasy had stood as a union of three regions, the famous grand divisions, sandwiched between the old Midwest to the north and the Deep South to the south. While the centuries since have seen the Grand Divisions crumble until only the middle is left standing, Tenasy’s geographic position remains the same, and offers a road to power for any governor strong or foolish enough to take it.

The heart of Tenasy is the Cumberland (Central) Basin, an area of relatively flat terrain, small ranges of hills and good soil that is well-watered by the many rivers that flow across it. This basin supports more than half of the state’s population, but it would be unable to carry such a large number of residents were it not for the other major geographic formation of the region, the Highland Rim. The Rim is a belt of dense forests and rough hills that shield the Basin from outside marauders; while it is difficult to penetrate, its soil is of passable quality and thus it has a sizable population. These two landforms ensured that, even as the Regression crippled much of the surrounding country, Middle Tenasy was able to get on fairly well. It was far from perfect, of course--there was a reason why the capital was moved to Fort Rosencrans, on an island in the Stones River[1] near Murfreesboro--but the region was spared from the destruction that was visited on much of the South.

While the Cumberland Basin remained mostly intact, the same could not be said for the state itself. East Tennessee, the valley of the Tennessee River, separated from the Basin by the Cumberland Plateau and the ridges-and-valleys of the southern Appalachians, drifted away from the government in Rosencrans during a period of turmoil, helped by the general difficulties in communicating across the rough terrain. West Tennessee was also lost, being pulled into Mississippi’s orbit and gradually drifting away over the course of decades.

This left a rump state led by a generally weak governor out of Rosencrans, a state of affairs that lasted for several centuries. The nobility were more than happy to go along with a weak monarchy, as there were no real threats beyond the Kentuckians to the north and the occasional Appalachian raiders from the east. The Kentuckians, like the Mississippians to the south, could rather easily be bought off if needed, and even if they did conquer Tenasy, the aristocracy would be assimilated into the ranks of the conquerors, as was fairly standard procedure in the region. Most governors were willing to accept this state of affairs, and those which weren’t were almost universally overthrown. As you might imagine, this bred conflict between factions of the nobility, and Tenasy soon played host to chronic succession wars which were exacerbated by foreign influence. More than a hundred governors sat upon the throne in the years between 2500 and 2850, and dynastic continuity, let alone stability, was tenuous to say the least. Of course, no-one suffered more than the peasants; by the end of this period, the state had transformed from one of the freer regions to one with debt bondage and serfdom higher than anywhere else north of the Piedmont.

Through much of this period, which stretched from about 2350 to 2850, it was common knowledge that the Bishop of Nashville was more powerful than the Governor, eventually adopting a role similar to that of the grand vizier. The last and largest of the succession wars, fought between 2855 and 2861, pitted the sons of the late and well-beloved Isham I against each other, Alf having the support of the Ohioans and Bob the support of the Mississppians. The conflict raged for years with no clear victory, until at last the Bishop of Nashville, Thomas Abbot, managed to talk the brothers into a ceasefire at Rosecrans; however, they refused to agree on anything, and negotiations dragged on for weeks. Sensing that the nobles were tired of fighting, let alone the peasants, Abbot quietly managed to convince the Ohioans to withdraw their support for their man, and the Mississippians as well. He then persuaded the discontent nobles to elect him as governor, hoping to present a fait accompli to the Landons and to his superiors in Baltimore. Surprisingly this worked and Thomas Abbot became the Governor-Bishop of Tenasy. Of course, this little stunt infuriated the church proper, as Abbot had effectively blown all of the good will the church had built in the region in one go. He was ordered to abdicate and come to Baltimore immediately, which he swiftly did after the threat of all hell being unleashed upon him.

While Thomas Abbot would spend the rest of his life in a cell overlooking the Back River, his nephew, Lee Abbot, somehow managed to secure the governorship for himself. It is from him that the House of Abbot, which ruled Tenasy from 2861 to 2980, and who most famously moved the capital back to Nashville, erected Castle Abbot on the ruins of Fort Negley. Throughout their reign, the Abbots would slowly centralize power, restoring the influence of the governorship and establishing a royal monopoly on tobacco, one of the state’s chief exports. Lee I was able to diffuse the almost inevitable succession wars by giving his younger sons sinecure positions on river islands which they were forbidden to relieve under pain of death. Under Davy III (r. 2963 - 2980) the Tenaseans invaded Shelby County and advanced as far as the Forked Deer river before withdrawing, as well as defeating the Alabamians in several campaigns, briefly annexing Huntsville itself. However, this prosperity was not to last.

Throughout the 2960s and 2970s, a Hillbilly warlord known as John Lee had risen to power in the Sequatchie Valley, gradually moving east and conquering the Upper Tennessee Valley and much of the Smokies, even conquering the Blue Ridges on the far side of the mountains and forcing the Carolinians back across the Catawba. In 2978, he turned his attention westwards, feeling that Davy’s persecution of the Evangelists was a direct affront to his own position as protector of the Evangelists. John Lee and his horde of mountaineers invaded that year, defeating Davy at the Battle of Manchester and (supposedly) killing him in single combat. The Appalchians then steamrolled the Tenaseans, conquering most of Davy’s realm--the Alabamians recovered their losses--and settled several Appalachian clans on land left vacant by the fallen to secure his hold on the region. He proclaimed himself the heir of Alvin York, who was regarded as something of a martial saint by the Appalachians, and declared himself the head of the House of York. He then extracted oaths of loyalty from the Tenasean aristocracy and advanced across the Tennessee River against the Shelbians. He defeated them as well at Clarksburg, but fell off his horse while his army was crossing the Hatchie River and drowned.

With his death, the Appalachian army withdrew back across the river. As was tradition, John Lee’s empire was divided between his three sons, Earl Lee being given the lands west of the Cumberland Plateau. Earl was a fairly unambitious man, and his eighteen years on the throne saw little of note. A few river islands were conquered from the Shelbians, but the most notable event of his reign transpired to the north. With Kentucky reeling from the Ohioan invasion, the Tenasians conquered most of the Pennyroyal and fully integrated it into the realm. Earl leaned heavily on the Appalachians and the Kentuckians, who he viewed as more loyal than the old Tenasean aristocracy. He clung fiercely to his Evangelist faith, even going so far as to make an arrangement with Cincinnati so that he, as a nominal tributary, would be safe from any crusade against him.

Earl died in 2996, leaving the throne to his twenty-year old son, Nathan. Nathan was the son of a Tenasean woman and a fanatical Nondenominationalist, and swiftly set about reversing his father’s policies. The official reconversion of the state to Nondenominationalism was widely greeted with joy, Nathan parading through the streets of Nashville[2] atop a white horse. He significantly reduced the power of the Appalachian nobles, which with his above religious behavior made him a hero to the native aristocracy, and officially reopened the General Assembly in 2997, giving them next to no power but giving the nobles room to air grievances and make themselves feel powerful. He married Delilah Abbot, the granddaughter of Davy III, to secure his legitimacy as Governor of Tenasy. He also began persecuting all heretics in his state, burning the Bell Witch cult that had sprung up around Adams and a pseudo-Buddhist group that had popped up in Monteagle. Most notably, he forcibly converted the Appalachian nobility to Nondenominationalism, something which angered his uncle, the Governor of Appalachia, John II. As the 4th Millenium dawns, the two dynasts stare across the Cumberland Plateau. If everything goes well, it seems as if Nathan could achieve his dream of a reunified Tenasy….


[1] Fort Rosencrans is at the moment merely in a bend of the river, but the narrow connection to the mainland and the oxbow effect make me pretty confident that it won’t be for much longer.
[2] Nashville is and was a major center of the Baptist faith, so I assume that it would retain its importance as a religious center under the Nondenoms. I’ll chalk the 25 year long stay of the Evangelists as being possible because the Nondenom higher-ups were busy with something else.

Population calculations: I set the population of Tenasy’s central basin as being roughly equivalent to Medieval Italy’s, given their roughly analogous soil quality; “The Nashville Basin is carved out of a series of layers of different kinds of rock. Each kind of rock produces a different kind of soil”, Soil Field Guide, Middle Tennessee University; “Soil in Northern Italy ranges from unworkable to extremely fertile.” The Environmental Impact of Maize Cultivation in the European Union. The population density of medieval Italy (non-urbanized!) was ~75 people per square mile; The area of the Cumberland/Central Basin is 8,000 square miles; the area of the rest of Tenasean territory is (roughly) 10,000 miles. From this we get (75*8,000) + (60*10,000), which equals 1,200,000; I will round to 1,250,000 to account for urban and vagrant populations.
 
Interesting. Could you tell me more?
Well, for dog breeds specifically, I want to look at a few individual breeds, with a list of a few modern breeds that form the majority of their ancestral stock. (Of course, this is not a perfect list, as I doubt people would be highly concerned about pedigree in the New Medieval period). One I definitely plan on doing is the Michigan retriever, a lab/goldie/newfoundland/other water dog breed used by fishermen in the Great Lakes. Less defined ideas I have are large bear/wolf hunters, herding and hunting dogs on the Great Plains, and guard/maybe blood sport breed in California. The blood sport part I may not include/focus on for the simple reason that I don't want to write blatant animal cruelty T_T
 
Here There Be Monsters: Giant Pacific Octopus

Colossal_octopus_by_Pierre_Denys_de_Montfort.jpg


Long have sailors feared the abominations of the deep - Leviathans, Sea Serpents, Krakens, whatever they called it they knew something slimy was out there and they didn't like it. In the post-modern world of Medieval America, sailors have new fears to match the times - UFOs, Ghost Ships of the ancient Navy, the webbed claws of the Deep Ones. On the Pacific Coast, a special fear and reverence is given to the Giant Pacific Octopus.

Don't let the name get away from you: the majority of specimens only weigh in at about 35 pounds. Large for a cephalopod, no doubt, but no great shakes for a grown man. In fact, for a creature considered so uncanny, the sailors of the pacific chow down on it with particular gusto, being considered a delicacy in the Pacific Northwest. So what is it about these creatures that inspire such fear? Why is it that the mighty pirates and sailors of Baranoff have chosen this creature as their totemic symbol, rather than the whale, the shark, or any other aquatic beast?

Stories abound across the Pacific of a queer sort of intelligence that proliferates among the octopuses, an intelligence that though not altogether human is nonetheless deeply disconcerting for any man with firm notions about what separates himself from the lowlier lifeforms. The most common stories tell of octopuses spotted in the dead of night heaving themselves up onto land to steal fish as it cures. More disconcerting are the occasional tales of octopuses that toy with fisherman, playing strange games with them that more often than not end with them being tricked into allowing themselves to be pulled into the water. Most disturbing of all are the stories of shipwreck survivors who report their experience underwater, of seeing the creatures swarm. Some even claim that it feels as if they're trying to tell them something...

Soothsayers and spinners of talol tales insist that the creatures have grown smarter with time, since the Regression. Why is not entirely sure. One treatise by the heretic Californian Orion Menes who was R2-45ed some years after its publication argues that the species grew more intelligence due to the liberation of aquarium and university specimens, socialized and trained by humans, into the wild, where they have sparked off an intellectual revolution among the cephlapods. He also suggests that the creatures are growing in size, that their are colossal members of the species lurking in deeper waters, perhaps even directing the actions of its fellows...

Though this account was no doubt fantasy among Menes's many others, it has gained purchase in the Pacific consciousness, and the supernatural reverance for the octopus only grows with time.
 
Here There Be Monsters: Giant Pacific Octopus

Colossal_octopus_by_Pierre_Denys_de_Montfort.jpg


Long have sailors feared the abominations of the deep - Leviathans, Sea Serpents, Krakens, whatever they called it they knew something slimy was out there and they didn't like it. In the post-modern world of Medieval America, sailors have new fears to match the times - UFOs, Ghost Ships of the ancient Navy, the webbed claws of the Deep Ones. On the Pacific Coast, a special fear and reverence is given to the Giant Pacific Octopus.

Don't let the name get away from you: the majority of specimens only weigh in at about 35 pounds. Large for a cephalopod, no doubt, but no great shakes for a grown man. In fact, for a creature considered so uncanny, the sailors of the pacific chow down on it with particular gusto, being considered a delicacy in the Pacific Northwest. So what is it about these creatures that inspire such fear? Why is it that the mighty pirates and sailors of Baranoff have chosen this creature as their totemic symbol, rather than the whale, the shark, or any other aquatic beast?

Stories abound across the Pacific of a queer sort of intelligence that proliferates among the octopuses, an intelligence that though not altogether human is nonetheless deeply disconcerting for any man with firm notions about what separates himself from the lowlier lifeforms. The most common stories tell of octopuses spotted in the dead of night heaving themselves up onto land to steal fish as it cures. More disconcerting are the occasional tales of octopuses that toy with fisherman, playing strange games with them that more often than not end with them being tricked into allowing themselves to be pulled into the water. Most disturbing of all are the stories of shipwreck survivors who report their experience underwater, of seeing the creatures swarm. Some even claim that it feels as if they're trying to tell them something...

Soothsayers and spinners of talol tales insist that the creatures have grown smarter with time, since the Regression. Why is not entirely sure. One treatise by the heretic Californian Orion Menes who was R2-45ed some years after its publication argues that the species grew more intelligence due to the liberation of aquarium and university specimens, socialized and trained by humans, into the wild, where they have sparked off an intellectual revolution among the cephlapods. He also suggests that the creatures are growing in size, that their are colossal members of the species lurking in deeper waters, perhaps even directing the actions of its fellows...

Though this account was no doubt fantasy among Menes's many others, it has gained purchase in the Pacific consciousness, and the supernatural reverance for the octopus only grows with time.
You forgot to threadsmark it, also octopus are evolving in intelligence is a scary thought
 
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You forgot to threadsmark it, also octopus are evolving in intelligence is a scary thought
You think that's scary? I think it was suggested in the alternative evolution thread that some sort that a giant octopus with a carbon mesh in its skin would have enough structural support to get its gigantic tentacles out of the water and busy crushing ships 😱
 
Ok, I made a template for myself and others for making a breed of domestic animal. This is free for anyone to use, here or elsewhere.

Breed Name: self explanatory
Species: what domestic species is this breed part of?
Origin/Range: what part of the continent did the breed come from, and where can it be found now?
Ancestral Stock: what modern breeds do they descend from? (note: this is not a list of every single breed that has left some trace in the breed, just the ones that have left visible marks on the breed)
Roles: what is the breed used for? (i.e. meat, wool, hunting, etc.)
Physical Description: what does the breed usually look like?
Temperament: how does the breed behave? (i.e. friendly, independent, shy, etc.)
History: what is the history of the breed? (this can include notable members of the breed)
Status: how common is the breed, and is it at risk of extinction?
Other: anything you want to include that doesn’t fit in the categories above

I'll work on an individual breed soon-ish.
 
Breed Name: Michigan retriever (often simply called “retrievers” by residents of the Great Lakes)
Species: Dog (Canis lupus familiaris)
Origin/Range: While variants can be found across the Great Lakes, the most common kind is from Chicago, which allowed the breed to spread via trade.
Ancestral Stock: Labrador retriever, golden retriever, Newfoundland, poodle.
Roles: Fishing, retrieving, companionship
Physical Description: Medium to large dogs, Michigan retrievers usually have solid coats of brown, yellow, or black fur, which is usually long and wavy (though a few have the curly hair of poodles). Their webbed toes allow them to easily move through the water, and a double layer of fur keeps them warm even during winter.
Temperament: Considering their ancestors were some of the most popular family dogs in Old America, it should come as little surprise the Michigan retriever is very friendly. While the act of owning dogs entirely for companionship is not very common, the breed is known as a loving companion by all who know one. Indeed, a common phrase among the people of the Great Lakes is “a retriever has never met a stranger.” They have inherited the Newfoundland’s reputation as a “nanny dog”, being common companions to orphanages. Additionally, they are highly intelligent and trainable, making them useful for fishermen (who use them as fishing companions), showsmen (who incorporate them into their performances), and anyone else who keeps them.
History: Since the vast majority of people in Medieval America don’t care too much about pedigree, there isn’t a set date where the breed can be said to have started. That being said, a broad origin can be found in the beginning of the 2300’s, as trade increased around Lake Michigan. Merchants and fishermen brought their dogs with them, allowing the crossbreeding of regional breeds. By the 2800’s, when the name “Michigan retriever” was first coined by merchants from abroad, most water dogs in and around the Great Lakes generally fit the description of the modern Michigan retriever. One famous member of the breed was President, loyal companion of Luthor II of Michigan. According to legend, he was the one to first alert the Governor of the attack of the Night of Burning Ships when he uncharacteristically began barking frantically. This early warning is supposedly what allowed him, his bride, and his loyal soldiers to escape. Afterwards, he was given the honorary title of Deputy President.
Status: Michigan retrievers are very common, and can be found in practically every lakeside settlement in the Great Lakes. Their popularity has even seen them spread down the Mississipi, crossbreeding with local breeds. Of course, caring for them in the relative heat of the south is a bit tricky, but owners have figured out that they’re happier there with a bit of grooming and trimming.
Other: In a few settlements, most notably Chicago, it is illegal to kill a Michigan retriever, punishable by a small fine. Additionally, their large size briefly brought the interest of dog fighters, but the idea was scrapped when the dogs tried to befriend their supposed rivals.
 
Breed Name: Coloradan shepherd, Coloradan mountain dog, Coloradan bear dog
Species: Domestic dog (Canis lupus familaris)
Origin/Range: Colorado, with variants and descendants across most regions west of the Great Plains
Ancestral Stock: Great Pyrenees, Caucasian shepherd, Anatolian shepherd, various other large-bodied breeds
Roles: Livestock guardian, guard dog, war dog, bear hunting, dog fighting
Physical Description: One of the largest breeds in all of New America, the Coloradan shepherd comes in at around 120 pounds on average. Coats are long and fluffy. Coat patterns vary, but are usually white or bridle. Ears are sometimes cropped for protection against wolves as well as cultural reasons.
Temperament: Coloradan shepherds have a fearsome reputation that is only partially deserved. While very protective against anything one considers a threat, they are very loyal and loving to those it considers its flock. It does have a fairly strong prey instinct, however; it is recommended that smaller pets be kept separate from the massive dogs.
History: Coloradan shepherds are one of the oldest breeds in New America, with bones very similar to modern individuals dating back to the 2100’s. This, combined with Colorado’s position as a crossroads, has allowed the dogs to spread very far and give rise to several other breeds. They are the most common livestock guardian of the Rockies, though a few ranchers use donkeys or llamas to protect their herds. They are usually tasked with protecting sheep, the most common livestock of the region. An adult shepherd can easily take on a wolf, and a few can even hold their own against a full grown grizzly bear. Another common task is guarding drug farms. Such a lucrative business demands effective guards, and Coloradan shepherds are more than capable of dealing with a few interlopers. Additionally, many Coloradan warriors bring their companions into battle, whether against enemy tribes or the occasional outside threat. A darker use is for blood sports, namely in the Republic in California. There, dog fighting is considered an acceptable pastime, and the breed is one of the ancestors of the infamous Republican pitdog.
Status: The Coloradan shepherd is very widespread, and is popular enough that the demand for the breed is unlikely to dissipate.
Other: Coloradan shepherds are very closely tied to Coloradan identity; many clans bear the breed as their insignia, and it is often said the shepherds are a reflection of the people they serve: big, strong, and very guarded.
 
The State of Alaska

_medam__state_of_alaska_by_gottfreyundroy_dehvppt-fullview.jpg

  • System of Government: Clan-Based Feudalism
  • Head of State: Governor, selected from the ruling Evans clan
  • Population: 90,000
  • Religion: Laskan Orthodoxy
  • Totemic Symbol: Moose
Juneau's relative prominence prior to the Regression was basically a fluke. It simply had the good fortune of being a mining camp of respectable size that had the good fortune of being kind of near to the continental United States by virtue of its position in the Alaskan Panhandle. Had it not been for these strokes of fate, had the US acquired the territory a bit later, Juneau no doubt would've shared the fate of countless other mining camps. But history occurred as it did, a post office and courthouse were built, and it was off to the races.

When the New Medieval Age arrived, one could be forgiven for assuming that Juneau would sink into irrelevance, but that is not what ended up happening. Juneau had several things going for it. Firstly, it was a fairly decent port. Second, its position allows it to control most of the passages into the inland of British Columbia and the Yukon Country. Though the city itself is of course inaccessible by land, it is put in a very central locale to govern the mountain passes that grant access to the riches of the interor, including the Yukon. Third, the name of "Juneau" still had some resonance of prestige for other tribes. But perhaps the most important factor was the Laskan Orthodox Church.

The Orthodox Church in Alaska goes back to the Russian colonial period, but was long a minority religion. With the collapse of America and the consequent loss of faith in Old World beliefs, the Orthodox Church's rigid worldview enjoyed increased currency, and it was from Juneau that they would assert themselves. Clergymen baptized the barbarian war-lords and influenced them to see things Juneau's way. Perhaps the final straw was the conversion of the green-thumbed sages of Fairbanks, whose agricultural wonders inspired faith in many Laskans.

Most of these conversions occurred in the early dies of the little ice age that came not long after the Regression. The works of Orthodox missionaries were pivotal in establishing a Pan-Laskan identity and communication networks that would lead to the Great Raids. A famous tale holds that the omen for the Raids was given to the governor of Juneau was a double-headed bald eagle. Whatever the case, he contacted his counterpart in Ankrage and Sitka, and made this arrangement: he, as spiritual leader, would be the Governor, the official ruler of the whole of the Laskan people. The mighty warlord of Ankrage would be made President of Hosts, master of battle. And the pirate-king of Baranoff Castle would be made the Admiral of all Laska's ships. Together, they would lead their men down south-a-way for plunder and booty. And so it was, and so the unofficial system that governs Laska was born.

As time has gone on, first Ankrage became the upstart, essentially seizing control over all serious matters from Juneau and eroding their influence. Then, the upstart Ketchikan broke the system entirely when it asserted its independence from Sitka and Juneau, and both powers couldn't do much to stop it without the help of Ankrage. And of course, if the Ketchikanders aren't bad enough, Juneau must constantly compete with Baranoff to maintain control of the isles.

For the governor, now an impotent figure head, the Palace of the White Whale and the Cathedral of St. Nicholas has lost much of its luster. Its all a show being run by Ankrage at this point, but Ketchikan could call curtains any day now.

Yukon Territory

dehvq1d-031608a5-3e70-4305-a790-c34823184696.png

  • System of Government: Tribal Vassal
  • Head of State: Premier Chieftain, selected by the Yukonite Chiefs and confirmed by the Governor of Alaska
  • Population: 10,000
  • Religion: Laskan Orthodoxy
  • Totemic Symbol: White Horse
Yukon is a sleepy if foreboding country, nestled between the high peaks that make up the Laskan interior. Its people are certainly different from the Athabaskan tribes of the further interior, though are also not entirely like the Laskans of the coastline owing to their differing lifestyles, bearing more resemblance to the chiefdoms of Tokai and the Champain highlands. It's people make their living largely by hunting their lands vast forests and fishing its crystal clear lakes and rivers, and a very small amount of agriculture enabled by the techniques taught by the sages of Delta.

Most of its people live in small villages, the only town of even remotely appreciable size being Whitehorse. The polity exists more or less to secure interior trade for the coastal polities, especially Joono, providing a stable and friendly land where Laskan traders can mediate with Athabascans and Eskimoes. There is also a miner copper mining industry in its mountains. They vaguely follow Orthodoxy, though their form is more animistic than any of the others.
 
The State of Alaska

_medam__state_of_alaska_by_gottfreyundroy_dehvppt-fullview.jpg

  • System of Government: Clan-Based Feudalism
  • Head of State: Governor, selected from the ruling Evans clan
  • Population: 90,000
  • Religion: Laskan Orthodoxy
  • Totemic Symbol: Moose
Juneau's relative prominence prior to the Regression was basically a fluke. It simply had the good fortune of being a mining camp of respectable size that had the good fortune of being kind of near to the continental United States by virtue of its position in the Alaskan Panhandle. Had it not been for these strokes of fate, had the US acquired the territory a bit later, Juneau no doubt would've shared the fate of countless other mining camps. But history occurred as it did, a post office and courthouse were built, and it was off to the races.

When the New Medieval Age arrived, one could be forgiven for assuming that Juneau would sink into irrelevance, but that is not what ended up happening. Juneau had several things going for it. Firstly, it was a fairly decent port. Second, its position allows it to control most of the passages into the inland of British Columbia and the Yukon Country. Though the city itself is of course inaccessible by land, it is put in a very central locale to govern the mountain passes that grant access to the riches of the interor, including the Yukon. Third, the name of "Juneau" still had some resonance of prestige for other tribes. But perhaps the most important factor was the Laskan Orthodox Church.

The Orthodox Church in Alaska goes back to the Russian colonial period, but was long a minority religion. With the collapse of America and the consequent loss of faith in Old World beliefs, the Orthodox Church's rigid worldview enjoyed increased currency, and it was from Juneau that they would assert themselves. Clergymen baptized the barbarian war-lords and influenced them to see things Juneau's way. Perhaps the final straw was the conversion of the green-thumbed sages of Fairbanks, whose agricultural wonders inspired faith in many Laskans.

Most of these conversions occurred in the early dies of the little ice age that came not long after the Regression. The works of Orthodox missionaries were pivotal in establishing a Pan-Laskan identity and communication networks that would lead to the Great Raids. A famous tale holds that the omen for the Raids was given to the governor of Juneau was a double-headed bald eagle. Whatever the case, he contacted his counterpart in Ankrage and Sitka, and made this arrangement: he, as spiritual leader, would be the Governor, the official ruler of the whole of the Laskan people. The mighty warlord of Ankrage would be made President of Hosts, master of battle. And the pirate-king of Baranoff Castle would be made the Admiral of all Laska's ships. Together, they would lead their men down south-a-way for plunder and booty. And so it was, and so the unofficial system that governs Laska was born.

As time has gone on, first Ankrage became the upstart, essentially seizing control over all serious matters from Juneau and eroding their influence. Then, the upstart Ketchikan broke the system entirely when it asserted its independence from Sitka and Juneau, and both powers couldn't do much to stop it without the help of Ankrage. And of course, if the Ketchikanders aren't bad enough, Juneau must constantly compete with Baranoff to maintain control of the isles.

For the governor, now an impotent figure head, the Palace of the White Whale and the Cathedral of St. Nicholas has lost much of its luster. Its all a show being run by Ankrage at this point, but Ketchikan could call curtains any day now.

Yukon Territory

dehvq1d-031608a5-3e70-4305-a790-c34823184696.png

  • System of Government: Tribal Vassal
  • Head of State: Premier Chieftain, selected by the Yukonite Chiefs and confirmed by the Governor of Alaska
  • Population: 10,000
  • Religion: Laskan Orthodoxy
  • Totemic Symbol: White Horse
Yukon is a sleepy if foreboding country, nestled between the high peaks that make up the Laskan interior. Its people are certainly different from the Athabaskan tribes of the further interior, though are also not entirely like the Laskans of the coastline owing to their differing lifestyles, bearing more resemblance to the chiefdoms of Tokai and the Champain highlands. It's people make their living largely by hunting their lands vast forests and fishing its crystal clear lakes and rivers, and a very small amount of agriculture enabled by the techniques taught by the sages of Delta.

Most of its people live in small villages, the only town of even remotely appreciable size being Whitehorse. The polity exists more or less to secure interior trade for the coastal polities, especially Joono, providing a stable and friendly land where Laskan traders can mediate with Athabascans and Eskimoes. There is also a miner copper mining industry in its mountains. They vaguely follow Orthodoxy, though their form is more animistic than any of the others.
Hay flashman can you mark this thread as well other threads you dene canon please?
I say this because you have not updated the threadsmarks in a while
 
Hay flashman can you mark this thread as well other threads you dene canon please?
I say this because you have not updated the threadsmarks in a while
I'll get around to it, as I like to update the threadmarks and the OP simultaneously but it's a massive pain in the butt to figure out the formatting, not to mention doing the cross referencing to insure consistency.
 
dcvetw9-aa47de9f-5677-4ddf-831b-5ef3b0591c3f.png


Here's the completed worlda.
A little sneak-preview of the new version of the map for all of you kids out there in Radioland.

Medieval America v. 2 PREVIEW.png


Massive amount of new detail, new states, better formatting, and generally better geographic accuracy. Most of these improvements are out west, however - beyond being the best-detailed part of the setting, the East Coast is sort of a delicate house of cards, any change to one state's borders will have a ripple effect, and generally its much harder to squeeze things in with all of the tiny states and fine details. Unfortunately it seems almost bound to remain markedly less accurate.
 
A little sneak-preview of the new version of the map for all of you kids out there in Radioland.

View attachment 645512

Massive amount of new detail, new states, better formatting, and generally better geographic accuracy. Most of these improvements are out west, however - beyond being the best-detailed part of the setting, the East Coast is sort of a delicate house of cards, any change to one state's borders will have a ripple effect, and generally its much harder to squeeze things in with all of the tiny states and fine details. Unfortunately it seems almost bound to remain markedly less accurate.
I like how you depict the nomadic states. I must steal that for my own maps
 
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