List of monarchs III

No.

If you want to make a new list, then, at the current rate, you are going to have to wait for another day and a few hours, before, it would be considered as dead.
Mostly I just wanted to make sure it wasn’t forgotten. I think it’s interesting. Could you quote the last post to bring it up to this page?
 
What if Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales lived?

Monarchs of England

1485-1509: Henry VII (House of Tudor)
1509-1545: Arthur (House of Tudor)
[1]
1545-1552 Matilda (House of Tudor-Grey) [2]
[1] Born in 1486, Arthur Tudor was the firstborn child and son of King Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth of York. From a young age he was touted as a bride for the Spanish Princess, Catherine of Aragon. So it was that they were betrothed when they were young. The pair would first meet in England in 1502, and were married not long after. The two soon journeyed for Ludlow, the traditional residence for a Prince of Wales. There Arthur feel ill and almost died, though thankfully he would live.

Arthur and Catherine would live in Ludlow together and had 5 Kids, all of whom lived into adulthood. In 1509, Arthur’s Father, King Henry VII passed away. Henry had fallen ill with Tuberculosis. Arthur and Catherine would journey to London, where they would be crowned King and Queen of England and France at Westminster Abbey, by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Quicky, Arthur would begin negotiating matches for his children, with him looking to marry them to Spanish, Scottish or Portuguese Princes and Princesses. He would also sign several trade treaties with Scotland, Denmark, Spain and Portugal, most of which were successful and brought a wave of wealth into England.

Arthur also sponsored several Colleges, Scholars, and Philosophers, such as Polydore Vergil, Thomas More and Bernard André. These endeavours would lay the foundations for the English Cultural Revolution in the 1570s, 1580s and 1590s.

Arthur is also remembered for his campaigns against the French. In 1512, he invaded France during the War of the League of Cambrai and managed to force France to pay a large sum of money to England by the end of the war. In the 1520s, Arthur fought alongside his nephew, Charles and would help him defeat the French. As a result Boulogne and Rouen were annexed by England. Arthur also led campaigns in the 1530s, though these were not as successful as the ones from the 1520s and 1510s, with England only gaining some money and a handful of forts as a result.

Arthur is also known for launching the English Inquistion with his Wife, Catherine of Aragon. The Inquisition began in 1527, after a man translated the Bible into English. It saw the burning of all Bibles in any language other than Latin and the executions of men who were Protestant, women were spared, though they were fired heavily. While it failed to wipe out Protestantism in England, it did succeed in delaying it for a long period of time.

Arthur enobled many of his friends and colleagues. He made his long time friend, the Earl of Kildare, the Duke of Kildare in 1538. He made Rhys ap Thomas, the Earl of Pembroke and he made his cousin the Earl of Devon, the Duke of Devon and made his favourite Diplomat, Thomas Boleyn the Earl of Wiltshire in 1540.

Arthur’s health would decline in the 1540s and he died in 1545, after a 36 year long reign. He was survived by his wife and children. His wife was later made a Servant of God in 1875. Not long prior to his death he granted an English Explorer, named Thomas of Blackmore a charter to go explore lands in the New World.

Upon his death Arthur was succeeded by his Granddaughter Matilda

Kathy Stafford.jpg

Rachael Henley as Queen Matilda in the 2005 Drama 'Flowers of Faith', which, over seven episodes, detailed the lives of seven European Queens who, in their own way, all fought to defend Catholicism.

[2] No one expected Matilda to be Queen. No one really wanted her to be, either. But when Arthur died in 1545, there was little choice. The twelve-year-old was Arthur’s only male-line grandchild, born to his heir, Prince Henry, and his Portuguese wife, Princess Beatrice, the year before Prince Henry died leading his father’s troops during the 1534 invasion of France.

Henry’s sisters, Princess Isabella, Lady Margaret and Lady Katherine had all signed away their rights to the English throne upon their respective marriages, something Arthur, all too aware of how dangerous foreign claimants to a throne could be, had insisted upon, meaning their sons – between them, they had seven - were ineligible to inherit the English throne.

Had Matilda’s great-uncle, Henry of York, had a son or grandson who was Matilda’s senior in age, her accession might have been more difficult, but since, in 1545, his only grandson, Henry Stanley, Lord Strange, was three years younger than her, Matilda was crowned England’s first Queen Regnant without too much of a fuss, her Regency Council headed by the Dukes of Norfolk and Kildare.

A devout Catholic, Matilda strove to emulate her great-grandmother Queen Isabella of Spain in many things, including her efforts to Christianise the New World. She sponsored the creation of two new orders of missionary nuns – the Order of St Hilda and the Order of St Bertha, whom she sent to the Indies and to Newfoundland respectively. Both orders still flourish in the English territories of Berbice-Demerara and Rose County (OTL Atlantic Canada) today.

Matilda was promised to her second cousin, Alexander, Duke of Ross almost from the moment of her birth, her grandfather Arthur keen to reunite his line with that of his favourite sister. It was quite the scandal, therefore, when the fifteen-year-old Queen suddenly eloped with Thomas Grey, Baron Harington, while visiting his father, the 3rd Marquess of Dorset during her 1548 summer progress.

The young couple were blissfully happy, however, and managed four children in as many years.

Unfortunately, Matilda’s health had never been strong, and constant pregnancies only weakened it further. When she caught the measles in the summer of 1552, therefore, it was a death sentence.

Matilda died in her favourite palace, Knole, in the arms of her old governess, Lady Maud Parr, on the 12th of July 1552.

She was succeeded by…….
 
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Still looking for a suitable portrait of Matilda - will add one in when I find one. Do we want historical paintings or do you want to see the actress I would pick to play her if I could choose one?
 
What if... Arduin I defeated Holy Roman Emperor Henry II in battle?

Kingdom of Italy
1002-1015: Arduin I (House of Anscarid) [1]
1015-1050 Arduin II Augustus (House of Anscarid) [2]


Second Western Roman Empire
1050-1078: Enrico I (House of Anscarid) [3]
1078-1093: Maximillian I (House of Anscarid) [4]

Bertha, Queen of Italy

[1] Arduin was born in 955, in Pombia, to Dado, Count of Pombia, a nephew of the Italian King Berengar I who was deposed by Holy Roman Emperor Otto III. Arduin was named after his maternal grandfather, Arduin Glaber.

In 990, Arduin succeeded his relative, Conrad, as Margrave of Ivrea. A year later, Arduin became Count of the Sacred Palace of the Lateran. As the Margrave of Ivrea, Arduin backed monastic orders and minor nobles, which resulted in the souring of imperially appointed bishops. Arduin was eventually excommunicated, which was later confirmed by Pope Sylvester II. The pope also demanded that Arduin abdicated in favour of his eldest son. But, Arduin refused and returned to his lands.

There were brief clashes between the supporters of Arduin and the supporters of the Emperor. However, Otto I died without any direct heir, which would lead to a several-month-long succession crisis before any major clashes could commence. After the death of Otto III, a diet of Italian lords and knights elected Arduin as King of Italy. The Holy Roman Emperor Henry II disputed the election of Arduin to the throne of Italy. Henry sent Duke Otto I of Carinthia to Italy to depose Arduin, but in the spring of 1003, Arduin defeated Otto in the Battle of Fabrica, near the Brenta River.

Arduin rallied support from his allies to create an army to face Henry II, who personally led an army to invade Northern Italy. But, Arduin defeated the Emperor in the Battle of Pavia, and he was soon officially crowned in the city.

During Arduin I’s rule, he would help establish the independence of the majority of Northern Italy from the Holy Roman Empire. Arduin would rule until he died in 1017. The Diet of Italy elected _his eldest son, Arduin II_____________ to be his successor.

[2] Arduin II's reign was not an easy one. The Germans, embittered and furious about their defeat wanted to get back at him. The five years long German succession war was over and Germany was once again united under new king Bruno of Augsburg, late king Henry's brother and they didn't hide their intention to take revenge on Italians. The Germans weren't the first problem that was faced by new king, though. His brother, Ottone and Guilberto both revolted, claiming that Ottone was better fit to be king than Arduin. He defeated them, though, but they fled to Germany, when they conspired with Bruno of Augsburg to restore German hold over Italy.
The deed was done in 1021, when the Germans invaded Italy.
Initially, the invasion was much of a success even taking Milan and forcing Arduin to seek refuge in Rome, but several factors worked in Arduin's favor - a) the pope, Gregory VI was very supportive towards Arduin's cause, remembering who he was humiliated and nearly-deposed by Henry II, but treated kindly by Arduin I, so he excommunicated Bruno, Ottone and Guilberto and paid for Arduin's army
b) the old ally of his father, duke of Polans Boleslav the Brave, who took advantage of German crisis, consolidating his rule over Bohemia and even becoming duke of Kiev in 1018, after Yaroslav the Wise was killed, did not wish to see his gains forfeited, allied once againt with king of Italy and ransacked Saxony
c) Guilberto betrayed Ottone and Bruno and leaked the information about their position to Arduin
Battle of Pisa, which happened in 1023 proved to be a complete disaster for German forces, which found themselves quickly overran by Arduin's far more superior forces, with Ottone being killed and Bruno barely fleeing the battlefield.
However, Bruno managed to gain an important ally in form of Byzantine emperor, Basil II and his brother-in-law, Hungarian king Stephen I which allowed the war to go on until 1025, when Basil died and his brother and successor withdrew any support towards Bruno.
Stephen, not wanting to see his kingdom initiated the peace negotiations and these mostly successful, involving white peace for all sides in involved, except for recognition of royal titles of Bolesław and Arduin.

Arduin then spent time rebuilding his kingdom and governing, until Stephen I's son died in 1031. Stephen asked kings of Germany, Poland and all Slavs and Italy to support his sororal nephew, Peter Orseolo as his successor. The kings agreed and crushed anti-Orseolo uprising in 1040, leaving Orseolo on the throne. Arduin didn't do it out of his good heart, though. The influence of Orseolo family in Venice was not insignificant and in 1042, Arduin seized that city and placed it under royal authority. In 1045, he took advantage of Byzantine period of internal weakness and drove them out of the Italian peninsula. In 1046, he managed to be crowned Emperor, but he only reigned as such for 4 years.

[3] Enrico I would be the first ruler of the "restored Western Roman Empire", as the realm that his father had created would be known as. As ruler of a revived Western Roman Empire, Enrico I would have to face the menace of Constantinople, who was not happy with how his father had taken their lands in Italy or his proclamation as the new Emperor of the Western Roman Empire. However, he was lucky in how the ERE would have to face the Seljuks, who took over most of Anatolia by the end of Enrico I's reign.

In domestic matters, Emperor Enrico I of the Second Western Roman Empire would be a ruler who would focus on centralizing authority in his realm and trying his best to ensure a new era of prosperity and stability for his newly reformed Western Roman Empire with Milan, the capital of his "restored" Western Empire, becoming one of the largest cities in Italy with 60,000 people. His foreign policy as the new Western Roman Emperor would see Sicily taken from the Muslims and a war with the Holy Roman Empire which saw large parts of Provence taken by the new Western Roman Empire that Enrico had. Enrico I would die in 1078 with his son becoming the new Western Emperor after his death.
Harald 3. Hen.jpg

A 14th-century depiction of Emperor Maximillian I

[4] Maximilian I, born 1053, in Milan, was the third child of Emperor Enrico I and Judith of Bavaria. His two eldest siblings both died at young ages, thus Maximillian became the heir apparent to the Second Western Roman Empire.

During his reign as Western Emperor, Maxmillian I permitted knights, counts, margraves, dukes, princes, archbishops, bishops, abbots, etc, just outside of Italy to become semi-independent vassals of the Western Roman Empire.

In 1073, he married Anne of Lohrbach, a daughter of Count Otto of Lohrbach, however, his marriage to her would bore him no children.

Maxmillian I was an avid hunter and often organized hunts, which eventually evolved into the Imperial Hunt, a day of hunting that was officially recognized by the Western Roman Emperor and occurred every year. The Emperor was also a pious Christian, who wrote many poems about the wonders of Christian virtue, some of which survive to this day.

In 1093, Maximillian died of an unknown illness and as the Emperor did not have a clear successor, the Imperial Diet selected ___________ as Maxmillian’s successor.
@Cate13, here.
 
I do not understand why would Arthur Tudor would name his own granddaughter after the Norman Empress from the 12th century. He could've gone for Catherine or Elizabeth plus other common relatable names at the time. I suppose it's AH after all.
 
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What if... Arduin I defeated Holy Roman Emperor Henry II in battle?

Kingdom of Italy
1002-1015: Arduin I (House of Anscarid) [1]
1015-1050 Arduin II Augustus (House of Anscarid) [2]


Second Western Roman Empire
1050-1078: Enrico I (House of Anscarid) [3]
1078-1093: Maximillian I (House of Anscarid) [4]
1093-1107: Arduin III
(House of Anscarid) [5]

Bertha, Queen of Italy

[1] Arduin was born in 955, in Pombia, to Dado, Count of Pombia, a nephew of the Italian King Berengar I who was deposed by Holy Roman Emperor Otto III. Arduin was named after his maternal grandfather, Arduin Glaber.

In 990, Arduin succeeded his relative, Conrad, as Margrave of Ivrea. A year later, Arduin became Count of the Sacred Palace of the Lateran. As the Margrave of Ivrea, Arduin backed monastic orders and minor nobles, which resulted in the souring of imperially appointed bishops. Arduin was eventually excommunicated, which was later confirmed by Pope Sylvester II. The pope also demanded that Arduin abdicated in favour of his eldest son. But, Arduin refused and returned to his lands.

There were brief clashes between the supporters of Arduin and the supporters of the Emperor. However, Otto I died without any direct heir, which would lead to a several-month-long succession crisis before any major clashes could commence. After the death of Otto III, a diet of Italian lords and knights elected Arduin as King of Italy. The Holy Roman Emperor Henry II disputed the election of Arduin to the throne of Italy. Henry sent Duke Otto I of Carinthia to Italy to depose Arduin, but in the spring of 1003, Arduin defeated Otto in the Battle of Fabrica, near the Brenta River.

Arduin rallied support from his allies to create an army to face Henry II, who personally led an army to invade Northern Italy. But, Arduin defeated the Emperor in the Battle of Pavia, and he was soon officially crowned in the city.

During Arduin I’s rule, he would help establish the independence of the majority of Northern Italy from the Holy Roman Empire. Arduin would rule until he died in 1017. The Diet of Italy elected _his eldest son, Arduin II_____________ to be his successor.

[2] Arduin II's reign was not an easy one. The Germans, embittered and furious about their defeat wanted to get back at him. The five years long German succession war was over and Germany was once again united under new king Bruno of Augsburg, late king Henry's brother and they didn't hide their intention to take revenge on Italians. The Germans weren't the first problem that was faced by new king, though. His brother, Ottone and Guilberto both revolted, claiming that Ottone was better fit to be king than Arduin. He defeated them, though, but they fled to Germany, when they conspired with Bruno of Augsburg to restore German hold over Italy.
The deed was done in 1021, when the Germans invaded Italy.
Initially, the invasion was much of a success even taking Milan and forcing Arduin to seek refuge in Rome, but several factors worked in Arduin's favor - a) the pope, Gregory VI was very supportive towards Arduin's cause, remembering who he was humiliated and nearly-deposed by Henry II, but treated kindly by Arduin I, so he excommunicated Bruno, Ottone and Guilberto and paid for Arduin's army
b) the old ally of his father, duke of Polans Boleslav the Brave, who took advantage of German crisis, consolidating his rule over Bohemia and even becoming duke of Kiev in 1018, after Yaroslav the Wise was killed, did not wish to see his gains forfeited, allied once againt with king of Italy and ransacked Saxony
c) Guilberto betrayed Ottone and Bruno and leaked the information about their position to Arduin
Battle of Pisa, which happened in 1023 proved to be a complete disaster for German forces, which found themselves quickly overran by Arduin's far more superior forces, with Ottone being killed and Bruno barely fleeing the battlefield.
However, Bruno managed to gain an important ally in form of Byzantine emperor, Basil II and his brother-in-law, Hungarian king Stephen I which allowed the war to go on until 1025, when Basil died and his brother and successor withdrew any support towards Bruno.
Stephen, not wanting to see his kingdom initiated the peace negotiations and these mostly successful, involving white peace for all sides in involved, except for recognition of royal titles of Bolesław and Arduin.

Arduin then spent time rebuilding his kingdom and governing, until Stephen I's son died in 1031. Stephen asked kings of Germany, Poland and all Slavs and Italy to support his sororal nephew, Peter Orseolo as his successor. The kings agreed and crushed anti-Orseolo uprising in 1040, leaving Orseolo on the throne. Arduin didn't do it out of his good heart, though. The influence of Orseolo family in Venice was not insignificant and in 1042, Arduin seized that city and placed it under royal authority. In 1045, he took advantage of Byzantine period of internal weakness and drove them out of the Italian peninsula. In 1046, he managed to be crowned Emperor, but he only reigned as such for 4 years.

[3] Enrico I would be the first ruler of the "restored Western Roman Empire", as the realm that his father had created would be known as. As ruler of a revived Western Roman Empire, Enrico I would have to face the menace of Constantinople, who was not happy with how his father had taken their lands in Italy or his proclamation as the new Emperor of the Western Roman Empire. However, he was lucky in how the ERE would have to face the Seljuks, who took over most of Anatolia by the end of Enrico I's reign.

In domestic matters, Emperor Enrico I of the Second Western Roman Empire would be a ruler who would focus on centralizing authority in his realm and trying his best to ensure a new era of prosperity and stability for his newly reformed Western Roman Empire with Milan, the capital of his "restored" Western Empire, becoming one of the largest cities in Italy with 60,000 people. His foreign policy as the new Western Roman Emperor would see Sicily taken from the Muslims and a war with the Holy Roman Empire which saw large parts of Provence taken by the new Western Roman Empire that Enrico had. Enrico I would die in 1078 with his son becoming the new Western Emperor after his death.

Harald 3. Hen.jpg

A 14th-century depiction of Emperor Maximillian I

[4] Maximilian I, born 1053, in Milan, was the third child of Emperor Enrico I and Judith of Bavaria. His two eldest siblings both died at young ages, thus Maximillian became the heir apparent to the Second Western Roman Empire.

During his reign as Western Emperor, Maxmillian I permitted knights, counts, margraves, dukes, princes, archbishops, bishops, abbots, etc, just outside of Italy to become semi-independent vassals of the Western Roman Empire.

In 1073, he married Anne of Lohrbach, a daughter of Count Otto of Lohrbach, however, his marriage to her would bore him no children.

Maxmillian I was an avid hunter and often organized hunts, which eventually evolved into the Imperial Hunt, a day of hunting that was officially recognized by the Western Roman Emperor and occurred every year. The Emperor was also a pious Christian, who wrote many poems about the wonders of Christian virtue, some of which survive to this day.

In 1093, Maximillian died of an unknown illness and as the Emperor did not have a clear successor, the Imperial Diet selected his distant cousin as Maxmillian’s successor.

[5] Arduin III was almost not chosen for his blood as he was descended from Ottone, Arduin II’s rebellious brother. But in the end he was elected.

Arduin had been one of the first Dukes to become a vassal of the Western Roman Empire. And while not particularly athletic or warlike (he would not participate or participate only nominally in both the many wars of Maximillian I and his many hints), Arduin was a skilled administrator with his lands thriving.

Aditionally, He had three grown sons sons leading the Diet to hope that the next election would be so difficult.

Arduin would be a very similar emperor to how he was as a Duke: boring but prosperous. After reigning for 14 years he would pass in his sleep, leaving behind ________ as his heir.
 
I do not understand why would Arthur Tudor would name his own daughter after the Norman Empress from the 12th century. He could've gone for Catherine or Elizabeth plus other common relatable names at the time. I suppose it's AH after all.
It's not his daughter, it's his granddaughter. His daughters were Isabella, for Isabella the Catholic, Margaret for Princess Margaret and Margaret Beaufort, and Katherine for their mother. It was his son Henry that named his daughter Matilda. As for why: she was a warrior's daughter, granddaughter and great-granddaughter. Why shouldn't she be named for a warrior's Queen? :)
 
It's not his daughter, it's his granddaughter. His daughters were Isabella, for Isabella the Catholic, Margaret for Princess Margaret and Margaret Beaufort, and Katherine for their mother. It was his son Henry that named his daughter Matilda. As for why: she was a warrior's daughter, granddaughter and great-granddaughter. Why shouldn't she be named for a warrior's Queen? :)
Thanks for the clarification anyways, but okay I suppose for the naming.
 
What if Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales lived?

Monarchs of England

1485-1509: Henry VII (House of Tudor)
1509-1545: Arthur (House of Tudor)
[1]
1545-1552: Matilda (House of Tudor-Grey) [2]
1552-1589: Henry “the strange” VIII (House of Tudor-Stanley) [3]


[1] Born in 1486, Arthur Tudor was the firstborn child and son of King Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth of York. From a young age he was touted as a bride for the Spanish Princess, Catherine of Aragon. So it was that they were betrothed when they were young. The pair would first meet in England in 1502, and were married not long after. The two soon journeyed for Ludlow, the traditional residence for a Prince of Wales. There Arthur feel ill and almost died, though thankfully he would live.

Arthur and Catherine would live in Ludlow together and had 5 Kids, all of whom lived into adulthood. In 1509, Arthur’s Father, King Henry VII passed away. Henry had fallen ill with Tuberculosis. Arthur and Catherine would journey to London, where they would be crowned King and Queen of England and France at Westminster Abbey, by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Quicky, Arthur would begin negotiating matches for his children, with him looking to marry them to Spanish, Scottish or Portuguese Princes and Princesses. He would also sign several trade treaties with Scotland, Denmark, Spain and Portugal, most of which were successful and brought a wave of wealth into England.

Arthur also sponsored several Colleges, Scholars, and Philosophers, such as Polydore Vergil, Thomas More and Bernard André. These endeavours would lay the foundations for the English Cultural Revolution in the 1570s, 1580s and 1590s.

Arthur is also remembered for his campaigns against the French. In 1512, he invaded France during the War of the League of Cambrai and managed to force France to pay a large sum of money to England by the end of the war. In the 1520s, Arthur fought alongside his nephew, Charles and would help him defeat the French. As a result Boulogne and Rouen were annexed by England. Arthur also led campaigns in the 1530s, though these were not as successful as the ones from the 1520s and 1510s, with England only gaining some money and a handful of forts as a result.

Arthur is also known for launching the English Inquistion with his Wife, Catherine of Aragon. The Inquisition began in 1527, after a man translated the Bible into English. It saw the burning of all Bibles in any language other than Latin and the executions of men who were Protestant, women were spared, though they were fired heavily. While it failed to wipe out Protestantism in England, it did succeed in delaying it for a long period of time.

Arthur enobled many of his friends and colleagues. He made his long time friend, the Earl of Kildare, the Duke of Kildare in 1538. He made Rhys ap Thomas, the Earl of Pembroke and he made his cousin the Earl of Devon, the Duke of Devon and made his favourite Diplomat, Thomas Boleyn the Earl of Wiltshire in 1540.

Arthur’s health would decline in the 1540s and he died in 1545, after a 36 year long reign. He was survived by his wife and children. His wife was later made a Servant of God in 1875. Not long prior to his death he granted an English Explorer, named Thomas of Blackmore a charter to go explore lands in the New World.

Upon his death Arthur was succeeded by his Granddaughter Matilda.

View attachment 650727
Rachael Henley as Queen Matilda in the 2005 Drama 'Flowers of Faith', which, over seven episodes, detailed the lives of seven European Queens who, in their own way, all fought to defend Catholicism.

[2] No one expected Matilda to be Queen. No one really wanted her to be, either. But when Arthur died in 1545, there was little choice. The twelve-year-old was Arthur’s only male-line grandchild, born to his heir, Prince Henry, and his Portuguese wife, Princess Beatrice, the year before Prince Henry died leading his father’s troops during the 1534 invasion of France.

Henry’s sisters, Princess Isabella, Lady Margaret and Lady Katherine had all signed away their rights to the English throne upon their respective marriages, something Arthur, all too aware of how dangerous foreign claimants to a throne could be, had insisted upon, meaning their sons – between them, they had seven - were ineligible to inherit the English throne.

Had Matilda’s great-uncle, Henry of York, had a son or grandson who was Matilda’s senior in age, her accession might have been more difficult, but since, in 1545, his only grandson, Henry Stanley, Lord Strange, was three years younger than her, Matilda was crowned England’s first Queen Regnant without too much of a fuss, her Regency Council headed by the Dukes of Norfolk and Kildare.

A devout Catholic, Matilda strove to emulate her great-grandmother Queen Isabella of Spain in many things, including her efforts to Christianise the New World. She sponsored the creation of two new orders of missionary nuns – the Order of St Hilda and the Order of St Bertha, whom she sent to the Indies and to Newfoundland respectively. Both orders still flourish in the English territories of Berbice-Demerara and Rose County (OTL Atlantic Canada) today.

Matilda was promised to her second cousin, Alexander, Duke of Ross almost from the moment of her birth, her grandfather Arthur keen to reunite his line with that of his favourite sister. It was quite the scandal, therefore, when the fifteen-year-old Queen suddenly eloped with Thomas Grey, Baron Harington, while visiting his father, the 3rd Marquess of Dorset during her 1548 summer progress.

The young couple were blissfully happy, however, and managed four children in as many years.

Unfortunately, Matilda’s health had never been strong, and constant pregnancies only weakened it further. When she caught the measles in the summer of 1552, therefore, it was a death sentence.

Matilda died in her favourite palace, Knole, in the arms of her old governess, Lady Maud Parr, on the 12th of July 1552.

She was succeeded by her 16 year old cousin, Henry Stanley, Lord Strange.
1621037579664.png


[3] Henry Stanly, Lord Strange, Duke of York, was born in 1536, the son of Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509–1572) and Elizabeth, Duchess of York (1513-1551) eldest daughter and heiress of Henry, Duke of York (1491-1534, dying in France along side his nephew) by his wife, Lady Elizabeth Stafford (c.1497–1558)

While Matilda had isolated a lot of politics by marrying below her station, Henry’s father, was arranging his alliances and giving his son the best education

In 1551, 15 year old Henry was married to 18 year old, Margaret of Scotland (1533-1599), second daughter and third child of James V (1512-1548) and Renée of France (1510-1574).

With the support of Scotland and Northern lords, Henry Stanly was able to ride south to London to declare himself king.
Prince consort, Thomas Grey, Baron Harington, was imprisoned at the Tower of London, for treason.
Matilda’s four children, were declared illegitimate and placed into the ward ship of Henry’s ally Thomas Percy, 7th Earl of Northumberland.

For the next 37 years, Henry would carrying on his cousin’s religious and colonial policies, while improving on foreign relationships which had been ruined under Matilda’s reign.

Matilda’s daughters were each sent to the the Order of St Hilda and the Order of St Bertha, one son died of the sweats, as an infant, while the eldest son was sent as a missionary to colonies on the coast of New Derby (South Africa)

Henry enjoyed trade and peace abroad, while sending settlers to slowly colonies Ireland, with hopes to unite the ancient tribal kingdoms under the English rule.
His death aged 43, came following years of lazy living leading to obesity, at his death he had a waist measurement of 58 inches, and had became confined to the ground floor Richmond Palace. He was covered with painful, pus-filled boils and suffered from gout. He was succeeded by ____________, _______________.
 
What if Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales lived?

Monarchs of England

1485-1509: Henry VII (House of Tudor)
1509-1545: Arthur (House of Tudor)
[1]
1545-1552: Matilda (House of Tudor-Grey) [2]
1552-1589: Henry “the strange” VIII (House of Tudor-Stanley) [3]
1589 - 1618: Catherine I (House of Tudor-Stanley) [4]


[1] Born in 1486, Arthur Tudor was the firstborn child and son of King Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth of York. From a young age he was touted as a bride for the Spanish Princess, Catherine of Aragon. So it was that they were betrothed when they were young. The pair would first meet in England in 1502, and were married not long after. The two soon journeyed for Ludlow, the traditional residence for a Prince of Wales. There Arthur feel ill and almost died, though thankfully he would live.

Arthur and Catherine would live in Ludlow together and had 5 Kids, all of whom lived into adulthood. In 1509, Arthur’s Father, King Henry VII passed away. Henry had fallen ill with Tuberculosis. Arthur and Catherine would journey to London, where they would be crowned King and Queen of England and France at Westminster Abbey, by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Quicky, Arthur would begin negotiating matches for his children, with him looking to marry them to Spanish, Scottish or Portuguese Princes and Princesses. He would also sign several trade treaties with Scotland, Denmark, Spain and Portugal, most of which were successful and brought a wave of wealth into England.

Arthur also sponsored several Colleges, Scholars, and Philosophers, such as Polydore Vergil, Thomas More and Bernard André. These endeavours would lay the foundations for the English Cultural Revolution in the 1570s, 1580s and 1590s.

Arthur is also remembered for his campaigns against the French. In 1512, he invaded France during the War of the League of Cambrai and managed to force France to pay a large sum of money to England by the end of the war. In the 1520s, Arthur fought alongside his nephew, Charles and would help him defeat the French. As a result Boulogne and Rouen were annexed by England. Arthur also led campaigns in the 1530s, though these were not as successful as the ones from the 1520s and 1510s, with England only gaining some money and a handful of forts as a result.

Arthur is also known for launching the English Inquistion with his Wife, Catherine of Aragon. The Inquisition began in 1527, after a man translated the Bible into English. It saw the burning of all Bibles in any language other than Latin and the executions of men who were Protestant, women were spared, though they were fired heavily. While it failed to wipe out Protestantism in England, it did succeed in delaying it for a long period of time.

Arthur enobled many of his friends and colleagues. He made his long time friend, the Earl of Kildare, the Duke of Kildare in 1538. He made Rhys ap Thomas, the Earl of Pembroke and he made his cousin the Earl of Devon, the Duke of Devon and made his favourite Diplomat, Thomas Boleyn the Earl of Wiltshire in 1540.

Arthur’s health would decline in the 1540s and he died in 1545, after a 36 year long reign. He was survived by his wife and children. His wife was later made a Servant of God in 1875. Not long prior to his death he granted an English Explorer, named Thomas of Blackmore a charter to go explore lands in the New World.

Upon his death Arthur was succeeded by his Granddaughter Matilda.

View attachment 650727
Rachael Henley as Queen Matilda in the 2005 Drama 'Flowers of Faith', which, over seven episodes, detailed the lives of seven European Queens who, in their own way, all fought to defend Catholicism.

[2] No one expected Matilda to be Queen. No one really wanted her to be, either. But when Arthur died in 1545, there was little choice. The twelve-year-old was Arthur’s only male-line grandchild, born to his heir, Prince Henry, and his Portuguese wife, Princess Beatrice, the year before Prince Henry died leading his father’s troops during the 1534 invasion of France.

Henry’s sisters, Princess Isabella, Lady Margaret and Lady Katherine had all signed away their rights to the English throne upon their respective marriages, something Arthur, all too aware of how dangerous foreign claimants to a throne could be, had insisted upon, meaning their sons – between them, they had seven - were ineligible to inherit the English throne.

Had Matilda’s great-uncle, Henry of York, had a son or grandson who was Matilda’s senior in age, her accession might have been more difficult, but since, in 1545, his only grandson, Henry Stanley, Lord Strange, was three years younger than her, Matilda was crowned England’s first Queen Regnant without too much of a fuss, her Regency Council headed by the Dukes of Norfolk and Kildare.

A devout Catholic, Matilda strove to emulate her great-grandmother Queen Isabella of Spain in many things, including her efforts to Christianise the New World. She sponsored the creation of two new orders of missionary nuns – the Order of St Hilda and the Order of St Bertha, whom she sent to the Indies and to Newfoundland respectively. Both orders still flourish in the English territories of Berbice-Demerara and Rose County (OTL Atlantic Canada) today.

Matilda was promised to her second cousin, Alexander, Duke of Ross almost from the moment of her birth, her grandfather Arthur keen to reunite his line with that of his favourite sister. It was quite the scandal, therefore, when the fifteen-year-old Queen suddenly eloped with Thomas Grey, Baron Harington, while visiting his father, the 3rd Marquess of Dorset during her 1548 summer progress.

The young couple were blissfully happy, however, and managed four children in as many years.

Unfortunately, Matilda’s health had never been strong, and constant pregnancies only weakened it further. When she caught the measles in the summer of 1552, therefore, it was a death sentence.

Matilda died in her favourite palace, Knole, in the arms of her old governess, Lady Maud Parr, on the 12th of July 1552.

She was succeeded by her 16 year old cousin, Henry Stanley, Lord Strange.
View attachment 650743


[3] Henry Stanly, Lord Strange, Duke of York, was born in 1536, the son of Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509–1572) and Elizabeth, Duchess of York (1513-1551) eldest daughter and heiress of Henry, Duke of York (1491-1534, dying in France along side his nephew) by his wife, Lady Elizabeth Stafford (c.1497–1558)



While Matilda had isolated a lot of politics by marrying below her station, Henry’s father, was arranging his alliances and giving his son the best education



In 1551, 15 year old Henry was married to 18 year old, Margaret of Scotland (1533-1599), second daughter and third child of James V (1512-1548) and Renée of France (1510-1574).



With the support of Scotland and Northern lords, Henry Stanly was able to ride south to London to declare himself king.

Prince consort, Thomas Grey, Baron Harington, was imprisoned at the Tower of London, for treason.

Matilda’s four children, were declared illegitimate and placed into the ward ship of Henry’s ally Thomas Percy, 7th Earl of Northumberland.



For the next 37 years, Henry would carrying on his cousin’s religious and colonial policies, while improving on foreign relationships which had been ruined under Matilda’s reign.



Matilda’s daughters were each sent to the the Order of St Hilda and the Order of St Bertha, one son died of the sweats, as an infant, while the eldest son was sent as a missionary to colonies on the coast of New Derby (South Africa)



Henry enjoyed trade and peace abroad, while sending settlers to slowly colonies Ireland, with hopes to unite the ancient tribal kingdoms under the English rule.

His death aged 43, came following years of lazy living leading to obesity, at his death he had a waist measurement of 58 inches, and had became confined to the ground floor Richmond Palace. He was covered with painful, pus-filled boils and suffered from gout. He was succeeded by ____________, _______________.
220px-Elizabeth%2C_Queen_of_Bohemia_from_NPG.jpg

[4]
Catherine Tudor was born on September 1, 1567 as the older of two daughters of King Henry. As such, she was raised from a young age to be the Queen, something bolstered by her father's ill health during his final years as King.

Unlike her father, her reign would be one marked by a peaceful succession of power and would see a continuation of her father's policies, albeit with some changes to make them more flexible and effective. She would be a devout Catholic, if a pragmatic-minded one as well during this period.

One of her main achievements was how she dealt with Protestantism and helped expand her colonial possessions, killing two birds with one stone. Under her rule, the colonies of New Derby and the Americas became dumping grounds for "undesirables" who were utilized as easily expendable colonists with many of these colonists being either Protestants or Irish rebels, both peoples who Queen Catherine saw as "undesirables"

She would die in 1618 from a sudden stroke and would be succeeeded by the oldest of her children with her husband, a powerful nobleman, __________
 
What if Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales lived?

Monarchs of England

1485-1509: Henry VII (House of Tudor)
1509-1545: Arthur (House of Tudor)
[1]
1545-1552: Matilda (House of Tudor-Grey) [2]
1552-1589: Henry “the Strange” VIII (House of Tudor-Stanley) [3]
1589-1618: Catherine I (House of Tudor-Stanley) [4]
1618-1640: Arthur II (House of Tudor-Tudor) [5]


[1] Born in 1486, Arthur Tudor was the firstborn child and son of King Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth of York. From a young age he was touted as a bride for the Spanish Princess, Catherine of Aragon. So it was that they were betrothed when they were young. The pair would first meet in England in 1502, and were married not long after. The two soon journeyed for Ludlow, the traditional residence for a Prince of Wales. There Arthur feel ill and almost died, though thankfully he would live.

Arthur and Catherine would live in Ludlow together and had 5 Kids, all of whom lived into adulthood. In 1509, Arthur’s Father, King Henry VII passed away. Henry had fallen ill with Tuberculosis. Arthur and Catherine would journey to London, where they would be crowned King and Queen of England and France at Westminster Abbey, by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Quicky, Arthur would begin negotiating matches for his children, with him looking to marry them to Spanish, Scottish or Portuguese Princes and Princesses. He would also sign several trade treaties with Scotland, Denmark, Spain and Portugal, most of which were successful and brought a wave of wealth into England.

Arthur also sponsored several Colleges, Scholars, and Philosophers, such as Polydore Vergil, Thomas More and Bernard André. These endeavours would lay the foundations for the English Cultural Revolution in the 1570s, 1580s and 1590s.

Arthur is also remembered for his campaigns against the French. In 1512, he invaded France during the War of the League of Cambrai and managed to force France to pay a large sum of money to England by the end of the war. In the 1520s, Arthur fought alongside his nephew, Charles and would help him defeat the French. As a result Boulogne and Rouen were annexed by England. Arthur also led campaigns in the 1530s, though these were not as successful as the ones from the 1520s and 1510s, with England only gaining some money and a handful of forts as a result.

Arthur is also known for launching the English Inquistion with his Wife, Catherine of Aragon. The Inquisition began in 1527, after a man translated the Bible into English. It saw the burning of all Bibles in any language other than Latin and the executions of men who were Protestant, women were spared, though they were fired heavily. While it failed to wipe out Protestantism in England, it did succeed in delaying it for a long period of time.

Arthur enobled many of his friends and colleagues. He made his long time friend, the Earl of Kildare, the Duke of Kildare in 1538. He made Rhys ap Thomas, the Earl of Pembroke and he made his cousin the Earl of Devon, the Duke of Devon and made his favourite Diplomat, Thomas Boleyn the Earl of Wiltshire in 1540.

Arthur’s health would decline in the 1540s and he died in 1545, after a 36 year long reign. He was survived by his wife and children. His wife was later made a Servant of God in 1875. Not long prior to his death he granted an English Explorer, named Thomas of Blackmore a charter to go explore lands in the New World.

Upon his death Arthur was succeeded by his Granddaughter Matilda.

View attachment 650727
Rachael Henley as Queen Matilda in the 2005 Drama 'Flowers of Faith', which, over seven episodes, detailed the lives of seven European Queens who, in their own way, all fought to defend Catholicism.

[2] No one expected Matilda to be Queen. No one really wanted her to be, either. But when Arthur died in 1545, there was little choice. The twelve-year-old was Arthur’s only male-line grandchild, born to his heir, Prince Henry, and his Portuguese wife, Princess Beatrice, the year before Prince Henry died leading his father’s troops during the 1534 invasion of France.

Henry’s sisters, Princess Isabella, Lady Margaret and Lady Katherine had all signed away their rights to the English throne upon their respective marriages, something Arthur, all too aware of how dangerous foreign claimants to a throne could be, had insisted upon, meaning their sons – between them, they had seven - were ineligible to inherit the English throne.

Had Matilda’s great-uncle, Henry of York, had a son or grandson who was Matilda’s senior in age, her accession might have been more difficult, but since, in 1545, his only grandson, Henry Stanley, Lord Strange, was three years younger than her, Matilda was crowned England’s first Queen Regnant without too much of a fuss, her Regency Council headed by the Dukes of Norfolk and Kildare.

A devout Catholic, Matilda strove to emulate her great-grandmother Queen Isabella of Spain in many things, including her efforts to Christianise the New World. She sponsored the creation of two new orders of missionary nuns – the Order of St Hilda and the Order of St Bertha, whom she sent to the Indies and to Newfoundland respectively. Both orders still flourish in the English territories of Berbice-Demerara and Rose County (OTL Atlantic Canada) today.

Matilda was promised to her second cousin, Alexander, Duke of Ross almost from the moment of her birth, her grandfather Arthur keen to reunite his line with that of his favourite sister. It was quite the scandal, therefore, when the fifteen-year-old Queen suddenly eloped with Thomas Grey, Baron Harington, while visiting his father, the 3rd Marquess of Dorset during her 1548 summer progress.

The young couple were blissfully happy, however, and managed four children in as many years.

Unfortunately, Matilda’s health had never been strong, and constant pregnancies only weakened it further. When she caught the measles in the summer of 1552, therefore, it was a death sentence.

Matilda died in her favourite palace, Knole, in the arms of her old governess, Lady Maud Parr, on the 12th of July 1552.

She was succeeded by her 16 year old cousin, Henry Stanley, Lord Strange.
View attachment 650743


[3] Henry Stanly, Lord Strange, Duke of York, was born in 1536, the son of Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509–1572) and Elizabeth, Duchess of York (1513-1551) eldest daughter and heiress of Henry, Duke of York (1491-1534, dying in France along side his nephew) by his wife, Lady Elizabeth Stafford (c.1497–1558)

While Matilda had isolated a lot of politics by marrying below her station, Henry’s father, was arranging his alliances and giving his son the best education

In 1551, 15 year old Henry was married to 18 year old, Margaret of Scotland (1533-1599), second daughter and third child of James V (1512-1548) and Renée of France (1510-1574).

With the support of Scotland and Northern lords, Henry Stanly was able to ride south to London to declare himself king.

Prince consort, Thomas Grey, Baron Harington, was imprisoned at the Tower of London, for treason.

Matilda’s four children, were declared illegitimate and placed into the ward ship of Henry’s ally Thomas Percy, 7th Earl of Northumberland.

For the next 37 years, Henry would carrying on his cousin’s religious and colonial policies, while improving on foreign relationships which had been ruined under Matilda’s reign.

Matilda’s daughters were each sent to the the Order of St Hilda and the Order of St Bertha, one son died of the sweats, as an infant, while the eldest son was sent as a missionary to colonies on the coast of New Derby (South Africa)

Henry enjoyed trade and peace abroad, while sending settlers to slowly colonies Ireland, with hopes to unite the ancient tribal kingdoms under the English rule.

His death aged 43, came following years of lazy living leading to obesity, at his death he had a waist measurement of 58 inches, and had became confined to the ground floor Richmond Palace. He was covered with painful, pus-filled boils and suffered from gout. He was succeeded by ____________, _______________.

220px-Elizabeth%2C_Queen_of_Bohemia_from_NPG.jpg

[4]
Catherine Tudor was born on September 1, 1567 as the older of two daughters of King Henry. As such, she was raised from a young age to be the Queen, something bolstered by her father's ill health during his final years as King.

Unlike her father, her reign would be one marked by a peaceful succession of power and would see a continuation of her father's policies, albeit with some changes to make them more flexible and effective. She would be a devout Catholic, if a pragmatic-minded one as well during this period.

One of her main achievements was how she dealt with Protestantism and helped expand her colonial possessions, killing two birds with one stone. Under her rule, the colonies of New Derby and the Americas became dumping grounds for "undesirables" who were utilized as easily expendable colonists with many of these colonists being either Protestants or Irish rebels, both peoples who Queen Catherine saw as "undesirables"

She would die in 1618 from a sudden stroke and would be succeeeded by the oldest of her children with her husband, a powerful nobleman, __________


[5] Arthur was the eldest son of Catherine I and John Owen Tudor, Earl of Pembroke (the granddaughter and heir of Rhys ap Thomas having married a Tudor (though not a Tudor of the Royal House of Tudor, but a Tudor descended from a cousin of Owen Tudor)). As such he was prepared for the throne since a very young child.

He would succeed his mother at age 31, continuing the new tradition of peaceful transitions of power. At this point he was married (to Princess Beatrice of Portugal) with four children. Arthur and Beatrice would have another four children after he became king. The first four were much more polite, dignified, and refined; the second four having suffered from having their parents attention occupied by the ruling of a nation.

Rather irreligious, Arthur would relax many of the practices of his mother in regard to religion. Though by this point, the colonies were decidedly Protestant, and Arthur’s tolerance did much to bind the colonies to England, perhaps even avoiding a revolution.

Arthur would pass away age 53 from a winter cold that settled in his lungs. As his death was no surprise (he lingered for several months) Arthur had plenty of time to prepare his successor ________ and ensure that once again there was a peaceful transition of power.
 
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