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List of Alternate Monarchs and Aristocratic Lineage

Jacqueline of Hainaut born as boy (named William):

William VII/IV (1401-1454) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing 1417, m. a) Catherine of Artois (1397-1422) b) Margaret of Brandenburg (1410-1465)

1b) William VII/V (1426-1472) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing 1454, m. Mary of Cleves (1426-1487)

1) John (1447-1455)​
2) Adolph (1451-1453)​
3) William VIII/VI (1453-1501) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing 1472, m. Margaret of Burgundy (1456-1508) see below​
4) Mary (1456)​
5) John (1457)​
6) Margaret (1460-1491) m. Maximilian I (1459-1519) Holy Roman Emperor​
7) Agnes (1461-1511) m. George (1455-1504) Duke of Bavaria-Landshut​
8) Albert (1464)​

2b) John (1429)

3b) Margaret (1431-1436)

4b) Catherine (1435-1489) m. Charles (1433-1477) Duke of Burgundy

1) Margaret (1456-1508) Duchess of Burgundy, m. William VIII/VI (1453-1501) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing​
 
Jacqueline of Hainaut born as boy (named William):

William VII/IV (1401-1454) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing 1417, m. a) Catherine of Artois (1397-1422) b) Margaret of Brandenburg (1410-1465)

1b) William VII/V (1426-1472) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing 1454, m. Mary of Cleves (1426-1487)

1) John (1447-1455)​
2) Adolph (1451-1453)​
3) William VIII/VI (1453-1501) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing 1472, m. Margaret of Burgundy (1456-1508) see below​
4) Mary (1456)​
5) John (1457)​
6) Margaret (1460-1491) m. Maximilian I (1459-1519) Holy Roman Emperor​
7) Agnes (1461-1511) m. George (1455-1504) Duke of Bavaria-Landshut​
8) Albert (1464)​

2b) John (1429)

3b) Margaret (1431-1436)

4b) Catherine (1435-1489) m. Charles (1433-1477) Duke of Burgundy

1) Margaret (1456-1508) Duchess of Burgundy, m. William VIII/VI (1453-1501) Count of Hainaut and Holland, Duke of Bavaria-Straubing​
Wilhelm VIII/VI's would-be son is going to be very wealthy once he inherits the Burgundian lands I say.
 
I'll defer to our resident Visconti expert, @The Undead Martyr. They likely know all the details of this marriage arrangement.
I can't recall whether the county was returned as part of the dowry, or if Asti or any other territories in Italy were ceded (I think that it was). Mainly the match was an inheritance treaty (GG somewhat unrealistically did not seem to consider the French crown annexing Milan, rather an Orleans-Visconti line ruling independently; he really loved his daughter, and viewed the burgeoning Milanese state as the incubator of his dynastic and personal glory), and part of Gian Galeazzo's attempts to sway France (specifically Orleans) into Italy on his behalf, with various schemes of conquering either Genoa or the papal Adriatic territories and establishing his son in law as an ally in Italy, and/or curry favor in Paris to prevent them from siding with his enemies. The French were neither willing nor able to reciprocate, in part perhaps because his first marriage produced no surviving sons (one died at 18 I think).
He paid a fairly hefty sum- something like half a million ducats as I recall. The gold and extending French influence into Milan was the main draw.
 
I can't recall whether the county was returned as part of the dowry, or if Asti or any other territories in Italy were ceded (I think that it was). Mainly the match was an inheritance treaty (GG somewhat unrealistically did not seem to consider the French crown annexing Milan, rather an Orleans-Visconti line ruling independently; he really loved his daughter, and viewed the burgeoning Milanese state as the incubator of his dynastic and personal glory), and part of Gian Galeazzo's attempts to sway France (specifically Orleans) into Italy on his behalf, with various schemes of conquering either Genoa or the papal Adriatic territories and establishing his son in law as an ally in Italy, and/or curry favor in Paris to prevent them from siding with his enemies. The French were neither willing nor able to reciprocate, in part perhaps because his first marriage produced no surviving sons (one died at 18 I think).
He paid a fairly hefty sum- something like half a million ducats as I recall. The gold and extending French influence into Milan was the main draw.
Vertus belonged to Valentina as she was the only surviving child of her late mother (who had received Vertus as part of her dowry) and Milan was allowed to be inherit by Valentina‘s heirs only if the Visconti male line died (and Gian Galeazzo had not motive to suspect who Valentina‘s heirs would become Kings of France)
 
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Philip the Bold has one more daughter (Joanna, b. 1388) who marries Sigismund of Luxembourg

Joanna of Burgundy (1388-1443) m. Sigismund I (1368-1437) King of Bohemia and Hungary, Holy Roman Emperor

1) Elizabeth (1409-1461) m. Albert V (1397-1441) Archduke of Austria

2) Margaret (1411-1467) m. Vladislaus III (1408-1451) King of Poland*

3) Anna (1417-1459) m. Frederick II (1413-1471) Elector of Brandenburg

4) Joanna (1418-1419)

5) Catherine (1420-1492) m. Louis IX (1417-1479) Duke of Bavaria-Landshut

6) Charles V (1423-1454) King of Bohemia and Hungary, King of The Romans 1437, Holy Roman Emperor 1445, m. Radegonde of France (1428-1472)

* Son of Vladislaus II Jogaila and Anna of Cili
 
I'd love to see Joan of Navarre marry Edward of Angoulême if he survives ATL. More Anglo-Navarran (Navarrese?) matches please. (I'd say she could marry Richard II but no one deserves that sort of punishment ...)
Not an Anglo-Navarrese match exactly, but I had the idea of Pedro, comte de Mortain marrying Marie de Coucy, countess of Soissons and inheriting the Coucy lands (and perhaps (eventually) Navarre as well).
 
POD: Edward the Exile lives until 1070 and succeeds his uncle Edward the Confessor as king of England. Edgar Atheling becomes king after him.

Edgar II of England (1051-1125) m. Cecily of Normandy (1056-1126)
  1. Edward (1073-1099) m. Gunhild of Wessex (1070-1114) [1]
  2. Edith (1075-1126) m. Harold, Earl of East Anglia (1067-1098) [2]
  3. Edmund (1078-1082)
  4. Margaret, Abbess of Romsey Abbey (1080-1153)
  5. Agatha (1082-1093)
  6. Ethelred (1086)
  7. Aelfgifu (1089-1122) m. Eric II of Denmark (1090-1137)
[1] ATL granddaughter of Harold Godwinson.
[2] Posthumous son of Harold Godwinson in OTL. Becomes an earl because the Godwin family is still very powerful.
 
Philip III (1396-1467) Duke of Burgundy, m. a) Michelle of France (1396-1417) b) Jacqueline of Hainaut (1401-1459)

1b) Margaret (1423-1456) m. William (1410-1461) Duke of Brabant and Luxembourg*

1) Philip IV (1441-1499) Count of Hainaut and Holland 1459, Duke of Brabant and Luxembourg 1461, Duke of Burgundy 1467, m. Magdalena of France (1443-1495)​
2) Anthony (1443)​
5) Elizabeth (1444)​
6) Jacqueline (1448-1489) m. Nicholas (1448-1482) Duke of Lorraine​
7) Margaret (1449-1512) m. Edward IV (1442-1483) King of England​
8) Joanna (1452-1503) m. Albert IV (1447-1508) Duke of Bavaria-Munich​
9) William (1456)​
* Son of Anthony of Brabant and Elizabeth of Luxembourg
 
@Kurt_Steiner can correct me on whether this marriage would be more likely to be "successful" than Pedro's OTL marriage to another French Blanche:

Pedro I, King of Castile & Léon [from 1350] (b.1334) m: 1346 Blanche of Navarre [1] (b.1331)

Maria (b.1350)​
Stillborn Child (1351)​
Pedro [2] (1353-1359)​
Blanca (b.1356)​
Duarte[3], Prince de los Asturias (b.1358)​
Isabel (b.1359)​
Catalina (b.1361)​

[1] OTL, she became the second wife of Philippe VI of France, but between 1345-1348 she was betrothed to Pedro.
[2] Pedro seems like one of those guys who'd have an ego big enough to name a son after himself
[3] godson of Edward III of England

Continuing this:

Pedro I, King of Castile & Léon [from 1350] (b.1334) m: 1346 Blanche of Navarre [1] (b.1331)

Maria (1350-) m: 1367 Joao I[1], King of Portugal (1349-)​
Joao (1370-1373)​
Pedro II, King of Portugal (1373-1435) m:​
Ines (1375-1432)​
Fernando (1377)​
João (1378-1422)​
Blanca (1382-1410)​
Stillborn Child (1351)​
Pedro (1353-1359)​
Blanca (1356-1371) m: 1371 John, Duke of Lancaster (1340-1399)​
John (1371)​
Duarte, Prince de los Asturias (b.1358) m: 1375 Philippa of Lancaster (1361-)​
Blanca (1378-1431)​
Pedro (1380-1385)​
Duarte (1382-1384)​
Felipe (1383-)​
Maria (1385-1413)​
Juana (1387-1441)​
Isabel (1388-1459)​
Pedro (1390)​
Leonor (1393-1428)​
Margarita (1396-1451)​
Isabel (1359-) m: 1372 Edmund, Duke of York (1341-1402)​
Isabella (1380-)​
Edward, Duke of York (1381-)​
Stillborn Son (1383)​
Philippa (1384-)​
Catalina (1361-) 1m: 1375 Carlos, Prince of Viana (1361-1382[2]); 2m: 1365 ?​

[1] Son of Pedro I and Ines de Castro (Fernando I dies in infancy, and after the death of Pedro’s daughter, Maria), Pedro’s kids by Ines wind up as heirs to the throne.
[2] Killed in the battle of Mont-de-Marsan against Armagnac forces
@isabella @WillVictoria @VVD0D95 @Ivan Lupo @Dr.Evil @Prince de Pringondani @The Professor @Zygmunt Stary @Jan Olbracht @RedKing @Kurt_Steiner
 
An idea I had:

Jean IV, Duke of Brittany [1345-1399] (1339-1399) 1m: 1361 Mary of England (1344-1362); 2m: 1366 Joan de Holland (1350-1379); 3m: 1381 Bona of Navarre (1367-1397)

[2m.] Jeanne (1375-1379)​
[2m.] Jean V, Duke of Brittany [1399-1432] (1376-1432)​
[2m.] Marguerite (1379-1432)​
[3m.] Pierre (1388-1390)​
[3m.] Arthur (1390)​
[3m.] Marie (1392-1450)​
[3m.] Bonne (1395-1443)​
Jeanne of Brittany (named for her mother, father and grandmothers) dies unexpectedly in infancy. The shock of the news causes Joan de Holland to go into premature labour with her youngest child. Unfortunately, Joan dies in childbirth, although the daughter (named Marguerite for Joan of Kent's mom, Margaret Wake) is healthy. Carlos II of Navarre sends envoys to London to offer his daughter Juana for Richard II, but instructs them to stop in Brittany to sound out a potential marriage for his second youngest daughter, Bona, with the duke of Brittany. Unfortunately, the envoys never make it as far as London, since they end up being detained by Charles V (this happened OTL as well IIRC). Due to Bona being closer to marriageable age than Juana, she winds up as "duchess of Brittany" (the main competition to Juana OTL was Philippa of Lancaster. Here, with a breathing Anglo-Breton alliance in the person of Jean V, the English aren't pushing so hard).
Building on this:

Jean IV, Duke of Brittany [1345-1399] (1339-1399) 1m: 1361 Mary of England (1344-1362); 2m: 1366 Joan de Holland (1350-1379); 3m: 1381 Bona of Navarre (1367-1397)

[2m.] Jeanne (1375-1379)​
[2m.] Jean V, Duke of Brittany [1399-1432] (1376-1432) m: 1399 Catherine d'Alençon [1] (b.1380)​
[2m.] Marguerite (1379-1432) m: 1394 Edward, 2e Duke of York [2] (b.1373)​
[3m.] Pierre (1388-1390)​
[3m.] Arthur (1390)​
[3m.] Marie (1392-1450) m: 1400 Alain IX de Rohan, Comte de Porhoët [3] (b.1382)​
[3m.] Bonne (1395-1443) m: ?​
[1] OTL, Catherine's brother was his parents' ninth kid, and, at the time of his birth, their only son. Catherine might be French but she's also not "partisan" (Burgundy, Berri, Anjou, Orléans). OTL she married twice (first to Pedro of Navarre, then to Ludwig VII of Bavaria-Ingolstadt).
[2] Edward of Norwich is Richard II's "favourite". Marguerite is also Richard II's half-niece. The marriage sees Edward created "Lord Warden of the Cinq Ports" in 1396 (instead of his dad). My idea is that Anglo-Breton relations take a nose-dive following Richard II's deposition
[3] as meh as a Rohan match sounds, the comtes de Porhoët are "already" starting their climb. In 1373, Alain IX's granddad married Bona of Navarre's aunt, Jeanne. And in 1374, Alain's aunt, another Jeanne, had married Catherine d'Alençon's uncle, the comte du Perche. Not to mention Alain IX's mom is the daughter of Olivier de Clisson, the Constable of France. As with Jean V-Catherine, Marie-Alain is a French match aimed at not being "too French" for the English, or "too English" for the French.

@Jan Olbracht @VVD0D95 @CaptainShadow @isabella:
 
[3] as meh as a Rohan match sounds, the comtes de Porhoët are "already" starting their climb. In 1373, Alain IX's granddad married Bona of Navarre's aunt, Jeanne. And in 1374, Alain's aunt, another Jeanne, had married Catherine d'Alençon's uncle, the comte du Perche. Not to mention Alain IX's mom is the daughter of Olivier de Clisson, the Constable of France. As with Jean V-Catherine, Marie-Alain is a French match aimed at not being "too French" for the English, or "too English" for the French.
Indeed, the Rohan match is perfect for a younger daughter, not to mention Alain's paternal grandmother was also a rich heiress in her own right, though she had French connections too.
EDIT: er... the pun was unintentional.
 
Évreux Navarre continues.

Charles IV (1397-1449) King of Navarre 1425, m. Mary of France (1393-1440)

1) Eleanor (1413-1464) m. Martin II (1404-1435) King of Aragon*

2) Isabella (1414-1435) m. Edward I (1391-1438) King of Portugal

3) Mary (1416-1459) m. Humphrey (1390-1447) Duke of Gloucester

4) Charles (1419)

5) Charles (1421-1425)

6) Philip IV (1422-1481) King of Navarre 1449, m. a) Radegonde of France (1428-1444) b) Isabella of Bourbon (1434-1465) c) Bona of Savoy (1449-1503)

7) Joanna (1424-1427)

8) Blanche (1426-1494) m. Gaston IV (1422-1472) Count of Foix

* Son of Martin I of Sicily and Blanche of Navarre
 
Family Tree WI basis: Richard, Duke of York becomes King in early 1456 after he claims the throne for himself post-First Battle of St Albans, resulting in him submitting his genealogy earlier and the Act of Accord of October 1460 (which placed Richard, Duke of York as heir to the throne instead of Edward, Prince of Wales in the aftermath Battle of Northampton) occurring in 1455.
In OTL, I believe York didn't claim the throne at this point because he didn't covet the throne yet as was not pushed into a corner, as he was by the Nov 1459 Parliament of Devils. In this, Margaret of Anjou would have been much more aggressive in her approach to York, with an increased number of secret Parliaments (of which York is not invited to), in which an attainder is actively discussed (post-Coup at Dartford), increasing York's paranoia and need to move swiftly. Margaret of Anjou would be more aggressive as I would have the Nevilles ally with York pre-Dartford, increasing the seriousness of the Coup.
After York is named heir to the throne in the Act of Accord (which was put in place in Aug 1455 in this), King Henry VI dies in Jan 1456. He was said to have hurt himself in a fit of madness, resulting in his death, but many Lancastrians suspected York was behind his death

So, without further ado, family tree:

Richard III (formerly Richard, Duke of York) (1411-1472) m. Cecily Neville, Queen Consort of England (1415-1495)
1a. Anne of York m. Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter (exe. 1461) (a), Francis II, Duke of Brittany (b)
2a. Henry of York (born and died 1441)
3a. Edward, Prince of Wales (1442-) m. Magdalena of Valois (1443-)*
4a. Edmund, Duke of York (1443-) m. Margaret Beaufort (1443-) (marriage to Edmund Tudor annulled February 1456 (no Henry Tudor)) (a)
5a. Elizabeth of York (1444-) m. Charles the Bold (1433-) (a)
6a. Margaret of York (1446-) m. John V, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg (1439-) (a)**
7a. William of York (1447-died young)
8a. John of York (1448-died young)
9a. George, Duke of Clarence (1449-) m. Isabel Neville (1451-) ***
10a. Thomas of York (1450/51-died young)
11a. Richard, Duke of Gloucester (1452-) m. Margaret Stewart (1455/56-) (a) ****
12a. Ursula of York (1455)
13a. Joan of York (1457-) m. Joao, Prince of Portugal (1455-)*****
14a. Cecily of York (1457-), of weak disposition since birth, m. Edward, Earl of Lancaster (1453-)



* I do not see Richard III, who heavily critised Somerset's failings in France and had formally been Lieutenant, as being willing to ally with them and give up on the Hundred Years War. So, this marriage only marked a temporary peace with France whilst Richard III dealt with continued Lancastrian opposition, then he moved against France for Gascony, Normandy and Aquitaine. John II of Aragon's late reign featured poor relations with France, so RIII would have entered a formal alliance with him to add to his growing number of anti-French allies that included Brittany and Burgundy, giving a potential ally in RIII's undoubtable aims to reclaim said lands.
** furthering relations to the Hanseatic League
*** I definitely still see Warwick desiring a royal match for at least one of his daughters, and I don't see York opposing this as they were his allies, and his son would be marrying one of England's greatest heiresses at the time
****married during the unpopular James III's reign. Was organised by Richard III - suggested by the Duke and Duchess of York - under the premise of building better relations with the pro-English James III, but was, in fact, to weaken Scotland's trust in their King - was an unpopular match, a fourth son being seen as beneath the second Scottish Princess - thus lessening their threat.
*****twins are more likely to be born to geriatric mothers. Also, with the butterflies of York becoming King, who knows what could have happened? Especially as Cecily would likely have been capable of having further children as her mother - Joan Beaufort - was still having children in her later thrities as well as her sister. Also, forties pregnancies (Cecily, Duchess of York would have been 41/42 in 1457) as exhibited by Elizabeth Woodville, who had Princess Bridget at around 43).
 
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3a. Edward, Prince of Wales (1442-) m. Joanna of Aragon (1455-)* (a)
Isn’t Joanna too young for Edward? Would Margaret of Foix make more sense for Edward if Richard wants an anti-French alliance? It would bring Navarre, the Count of Foix, and possibly Aragon into the English fold.
 
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