Having shamelessly lied about alternating between Theodore and Corsica and then proceeding to post three Corsica updates in a row, I apologize and assure you that the next update will absolutely, definitely be a Theodore in London update. There will be less violence and more parties.

We finally got some knife action!

Well, someone certainly got some knife action.

IOTL, Andergossen survived his stint on Corsica, although he made rather a mess of his judicial duties and was recalled for various abuses. Nevertheless, he was promoted to Brigadier not long thereafter and was in command of the forces in eastern Liguria at the time of the capitulation to Austria in 1746. One source mentions he was still alive and still a brigadier in 1766, despite being 85 years old and half-blind (which suggests he was around 60 in 1741).
 
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I wonder if TTL word for guerilla ends up being corsican :cool:

That's actually something I've been mulling over for a while.

In WW2, the rural French resistance was known as the Maquis. This refers to a kind of dense Mediterranean brushland common to Corsica where bandits and insurgents could easily hide. The word, in fact, is originally Corsican; the French maquis comes from the Italian macchia, and in turn from the Corsican machja (and ultimately from the Latin macula, meaning a spot, stain, splotch, or other mark). I'm not sure when exactly maquis (in the sense of "brushland") came into use in French, although the OED says it's "early 19th century." If that's accurate, I assume it made its way into French as a consequence of the annexation of Corsica.

The Corsicans certainly linked banditry with the machja, particularly the banditi d'unori ("bandits of honor" - men who lived in the wilderness because they were marked for death in a vendetta, who might steal to survive but were not career criminals). If the Corsican Revolution succeeds, the image of the heroic Corsican "bandits" who drove off the invaders could, I suppose, lead to a popularization of the machja and its association with revolutionaries more generally, just as the experience of the Peninsular War led to the adoption of guerrilla. If so, the question is whether it still comes to English via French (and thus Maquis becomes associated with resistance fighters two centuries before IOTL) or whether it's adopted directly from macchia (as the more indigenous Corsican machja seems less likely to gain currency).

If it is popularized via Italian, I'm not sure what the singular form would be (i.e. the Italian equivalent of maquisard). I assumed something like "macchiatore," but a Google search suggests that this is already a word that means "stainer" (appropriate given its Latin derivation).
 
That's actually something I've been mulling over for a while.

In WW2, the rural French resistance was known as the Maquis. This refers to a kind of dense Mediterranean brushland common to Corsica where bandits and insurgents could easily hide. The word, in fact, is originally Corsican; the French maquis comes from the Italian macchia, and in turn from the Corsican machja (and ultimately from the Latin macula, meaning a spot, stain, splotch, or other mark). I'm not sure when exactly maquis (in the sense of "brushland") came into use in French, although the OED says it's "early 19th century." If that's accurate, I assume it made its way into French as a consequence of the annexation of Corsica.

The Corsicans certainly linked banditry with the machja, particularly the banditi d'unori ("bandits of honor" - men who lived in the wilderness because they were marked for death in a vendetta, who might steal to survive but were not career criminals). If the Corsican Revolution succeeds, the image of the heroic Corsican "bandits" who drove off the invaders could, I suppose, lead to a popularization of the machja and its association with revolutionaries more generally, just as the experience of the Peninsular War led to the adoption of guerrilla. If so, the question is whether it still comes to English via French (and thus Maquis becomes associated with resistance fighters two centuries before IOTL) or whether it's adopted directly from macchia (as the more indigenous Corsican machja seems less likely to gain currency).

If it is popularized via Italian, I'm not sure what the singular form would be (i.e. the Italian equivalent of maquisard). I assumed something like "macchiatore," but a Google search suggests that this is already a word that means "stainer" (appropriate given its Latin derivation).
Interesting.
Perhaps macchiato or macchioso used as a noun?
Or one could make up macchigiano based on partigiano, partisan, which bore a sense of guerrilla fighter.
 
If it is popularized via Italian, I'm not sure what the singular form would be (i.e. the Italian equivalent of maquisard). I assumed something like "macchiatore," but a Google search suggests that this is already a word that means "stainer" (appropriate given its Latin derivation)
Uhm it is not an easy question, I was thinking about it too...
You would stain espresso with milk? :eek: :winkytongue:
My colleagues in Italy mostly have macchiato in the mid-morning coffee pause. The haram thing is Cappuccino at any other meal that is not breakfast.

I think partigiano only acquired that meaning much later, but I might be wrong. *Macchiardo* could be a possibility, but also *Macchiante* might be, it is not really a common word the "staining" meaning.
 
I am almost feeling sympathetic towards Spinola. Certainly the local Greeks, who are pretty much screwed given how hard they have thrown their lot in with the Genoese.

I'm thinking that 'Macchigiano' might transform into 'machinator' or somesuch (in some dialects of) English, given confusion over etymologies, perhaps?
 
I am almost feeling sympathetic towards Spinola. Certainly the local Greeks, who are pretty much screwed given how hard they have thrown their lot in with the Genoese.

I'm thinking that 'Macchigiano' might transform into 'machinator' or somesuch (in some dialects of) English, given confusion over etymologies, perhaps?
Hmm if it goes via French like partigiano and cortigiano then likely we get maquisan or maquesan.
 
Although in french it's "maquisard", the suffix "-ard" may indicate wether (or both) a pejorative connotation or a belonging to the mentioned place "maquis".
"-an" can also indicate a belonging to a place, but I think it is more indicating the belonging to an activity.

My two pennies :
I would suppose it would transpose exactly in english (except for the pronunciation) due to the influence of french language in english, especially at that time. Moreover it would merge easily in the english dictionary due to its construction being equivalent to already known english words (see "drunkard", "coward", "wizard", ...)
 
Although in french it's "maquisard", the suffix "-ard" may indicate wether (or both) a pejorative connotation or a belonging to the mentioned place "maquis".
"-an" can also indicate a belonging to a place, but I think it is more indicating the belonging to an activity.

My two pennies :
I would suppose it would transpose exactly in english (except for the pronunciation) due to the influence of french language in english, especially at that time. Moreover it would merge easily in the english dictionary due to its construction being equivalent to already known english words (see "drunkard", "coward", "wizard", ...)
Well, OTL "maquisard" is a French formation based on "maquis", TTL they would be borrowing "macchigiano" directly and frenchifying it much like they did with partigiano (partisan) and cortigiano (cortesan). Assuming "macchigiano" is the word created and not one of the others suggested.
 
I’ve looked into some French sources and the earliest use of maquis I can find seems to be in 1775, or just after the French conquest of Corsica. “Maquis,” however, is not the original spelling - the 1775 document spells it mackis (“On appelle mackis en Corse, ce que nous appellons, en France, taillis ou broussailles”), and it appears in a 1791 document as machies. The first “modern” spelling I’ve been able to find isn’t until 1829, which seems to be why several etymologies give the early 19th century as the time of the word’s origin. The term was only associated with resistance fighters in the 1940s. From what I can tell, it arrived at that meaning by way of the phrase prendre le maquis (lit. “take [to] the bush”), meaning to take refuge in the wild to avoid the law or a vendetta, which presumably comes from the equivalent Corsican phrase piglià a machja.

The Corsicans of the 18th century associated the machja with bandits and outlaws, and could well have used piglià a machja or a similar phrase to describe men like Rauschenburg. One could certainly imagine a French soldier asking a Corsican villager where the “bandits” they were chasing had gone to, to which he might respond with a shrug - “a machja?” Although IOTL the adoption of mackis/machies/maquis didn’t come until after the conquest of 1769, ITTL the intervention of 1738-1741 was significantly more difficult, costly, and dramatic than the intervention IOTL, and might make a bigger splash in French culture. All you need are a few French authors to pick up on it, and perhaps a popularization of some of the officers’ diaries written about the occupation (of which there were several), and an early adoption of maquis(ard) in the sense of “guerrilla” seems plausible.

That said, given that the spelling was not “maquis” until 1829, if such an adoption happens in the late 18th century it might enter English via French not as maquis but as mackis or machies, which might lead in turn to a different pronunciation in English.

Alternatively, the term might come straight into English from Italian. Denis Richard, Theodore’s English (ex-)secretary, kept a diary and took it back home with him (which ITTL will be much better known, as will Costa’s writings once translated). Hopefully without giving too much away, I’ll also add that the mid/late 18th century British presence on Corsica will be greater than it was historically. In that case you might skip mackis/machies/maquis altogether and get the word straight from machja/macchia, depending on how the Brits write it down. I don’t have Costa’s original text, but if he used the word I assume it would have been macchia as I don’t think he wrote in the Corsican vernacular. I’m not sure how that would be taken up into English, or whether it would come straight from machja/macchia or through some theoretical Italian form like “macchiardo,” “macchiante,” or “macchigiano.”

I must confess that I like the sound of “machiard” as an English term, perhaps because it is reminiscent of the ancient Greek makhe and suffix -makhia, adopted into English as -machy, meaning “battle.”

I am almost feeling sympathetic towards Spinola. Certainly the local Greeks, who are pretty much screwed given how hard they have thrown their lot in with the Genoese.

Spinola is easy to sympathize with. Mari’s scorched-earth methods made him much easier to villainize; it’s hard to burn down people’s houses and cut down their orchards and look like the good guy. Spinola doesn’t shy away from ordering his commanders to march out and “make them fear justice” and so on, but if anything he’s too soft on the rebels. One gets the sense that while Mari wanted vengeance, Spinola just wanted tranquility.

The Greeks are in a lot of trouble, which is a shame because they have so much in common with the Corsicans. There’s about 800 Greeks on the whole island - men, women, and children - which means that, no matter how hardcore the Stefanopoli company is, if the Corsicans win this thing the Greeks will be utterly at their mercy. The Greeks know this, and in fact IOTL the Greek community tried several times to emigrate from Corsica during the rebellion, possibly to Sardinia or British Minorca, but the Genoese continually prevented them from doing so because they couldn’t afford to lose them. That didn’t stop the Genoese from withholding their pay when things got bad, however, and IIRC by 1745 or so the Greek militia company hadn’t been paid in a year.

I have no doubt that if he had his way, Theodore would keep them - he advocated settling new immigrants in Corsica to boost the population and the economy, and since the Corsican Greeks are technically Catholics they’re presumably even less objectionable than the Jewish colony which Theodore offered to establish. The question is whether King Theodore, even once the war is over, will actually be able to shield them from the wrath of the Corsicans, or whether the history of the Corsican Greeks ends with either mass emigration or a pogrom.

I have a more thorough post on the Corsican Greeks that’s kicking around on my computer, and at some point I’ll post that. They’re rather peripheral to the story right now but we’ll get to know some of their leaders a little better later on.
 
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Spinola is easy to sympathize with. Mari’s scorched-earth methods made him much easier to villainize; it’s hard to burn down people’s houses and cut down their orchards and look like the good guy. Spinola doesn’t shy away from ordering his commanders to march out and “make them fear justice” and so on, but if anything he’s too soft on the rebels. One gets the sense that while Mari wanted vengeance, Spinola just wanted tranquility.

The Greeks are in a lot of trouble, which is a shame because they have so much in common with the Corsicans. There’s about 800 Greeks on the whole island - men, women, and children - which means that, no matter how hardcore the Stefanopoli company is, if the Corsicans win this thing the Greeks will be utterly at their mercy. The Greeks know this, and in fact the Greek community tried several times to emigrate from Corsica during the rebellion, possibly to Sardinia or British Minorca, but the Genoese continually prevented them from doing so because they couldn’t afford to lose them. That didn’t stop the Genoese from withholding their pay when things got bad, however, and IIRC by 1745 or so the Greek militia company hadn’t been paid in a year.

I have no doubt that if he had his way, Theodore would keep them - he advocated settling new immigrants in Corsica to boost the population and the economy, and since the Corsican Greeks are technically Catholics they’re presumably even less objectionable than the Jewish colony which Theodore offered to establish. The question is whether King Theodore, even once the war is over, will actually be able to shield them from the wrath of the Corsicans, or whether the history of the Corsican Greeks ends with either mass emigration or a pogrom.

I have a more thorough post on the Corsican Greeks that’s kicking around on my computer, and at some point I’ll post that. They’re rather peripheral to the story right now but we’ll get to know some of their leaders a little better later on.
Spinola certainly has some nuance to him compared to Mari, which makes him more believable and interesting as an antagonist to Theodore and the Corsicans. That said, I'm still rooting for Theodore to crush him and the Genoese.

Hopefully Theodore can also do something to save the Corsican Greeks, because I can't see how they don't get killed off or pushed out of Corsica once the war ends.
 
I suggest macchiaro (montanaro=lives in the mointains).
Macchigiano is also good, like valligiano (from the valleys) or marchigiano (from the marche region).

I think partigiano only acquired that meaning much later, but I might be wrong. *Macchiardo* could be a possibility, but also *Macchiante* might be, it is not really a common word the "staining" meaning.
I think the original meaning is related to parteggiare (choose a side).
Macchiardo sounds more like an italianization of maquisard.
 
Super stoked for King Theodore getting to use his high class swooning skills in some proper continental parties

Otherwise loving everything and anything you put out
 
Binged this over the weekend. Feel bad for ignoring non-watched threads for so long that I didn't find this one earlier. Very much watched now.

Interesting that we have some of the same themes as Sons of the Harlot Empress (protagonists succeeding because much more powerful enemies become busy elsewhere, protagonists being chased off into exile only to return and win) but they're pretty unavoidable here as France getting busy in the War of Austrian Succession and Theodore going into exile are IOTL.

With the war on the butterflies are really going to flap their wings now so it'll be impossible to maintain a butterfly net around Corsica. I think the way that you handled covering stuff outside of Italy in SotHE was good, it kept the focus on Italy while giving us basic information from elsewhere. With this TL having a lot more posts per TL year than that one I'll have a much easier time keeping track of the who's who of foreign kings.
 
Thanks for the support! I'm glad this has been an enjoyable read so far, and I hope I can keep it that way.

Interesting that we have some of the same themes as Sons of the Harlot Empress (protagonists succeeding because much more powerful enemies become busy elsewhere, protagonists being chased off into exile only to return and win) but they're pretty unavoidable here as France getting busy in the War of Austrian Succession and Theodore going into exile are IOTL.

I'm a sucker for a good underdog story and I think that probably comes through pretty clearly in my writing. It's also part of what drew me to Theodore in the first place.

Of course the 'return from exile' plot actually happened twice in SothE, with Octavian in Corsica and then Ptolemy in the east. I should say, though, that while Octavian's journey obviously wasn't historical, it was based on the life of Adalbert, son of Berengar II, who fled to Corsica after Otto deposed his father and briefly landed at Rome before Otto forced him to flee again. Octavian's Corsican adventure in SothE is basically "Adalbert, but successful because Otto dies of malaria."

So I suppose both my TLs involve Corsica and exile; it's just that one has exile to Corsica, and the other exile from Corsica. :p

With the war on the butterflies are really going to flap their wings now so it'll be impossible to maintain a butterfly net around Corsica. I think the way that you handled covering stuff outside of Italy in SotHE was good, it kept the focus on Italy while giving us basic information from elsewhere. With this TL having a lot more posts per TL year than that one I'll have a much easier time keeping track of the who's who of foreign kings.

That's the general idea, although I'm still not sure how I'll handle certain events. I'll have to play it by ear, and probably rely a lot on the readers for suggestions, because as I've mentioned by knowledge of the 18th century world is not very deep.

I suggest macchiaro (montanaro=lives in the mointains).

[...]

Macchiardo sounds more like an italianization of maquisard.

This seems eminently sensible to me. For various reasons, I'm leaning more towards an Italian-to-English path rather than a French-to-English path. I do wonder whether the English would be inclined to borrow the word intact, or whether a corruption is likely - either just of spelling ("machiaro," for instance) or of pronunciation too.

Once I've picked a word and introduced it, I wonder whether I should go back and edit out guerrilla from the previous updates for the sake of in-universe consistency...
 
This seems eminently sensible to me. For various reasons, I'm leaning more towards an Italian-to-English path rather than a French-to-English path. I do wonder whether the English would be inclined to borrow the word intact, or whether a corruption is likely - either just of spelling ("machiaro," for instance) or of pronunciation too.

Once I've picked a word and introduced it, I wonder whether I should go back and edit out guerrilla from the previous updates for the sake of in-universe consistency...
Perhaps only replace where people have made direct reference in TTL rather than OTL notes?
I've been assuming a direct adoption of the full term rather than one derived from maquis/ma(c)chia, hence my avoidance of -ard suffixes.
I'm leaning towards a part anglicisation of ma(c)chiaro: mackerow? macaroon? (;)) macch(in)eer?
 
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