Interesting. So, Anglicizing the names and barring anything bad happening, the list of kings for Corsica at this time seems to be Theodore I, Frederick (I?), Theodore II, and Henry (I?). I like how Theo is more interested in/attuned to Corsica's history so he chose a name that might not have had any dynastic precedent.

Theodore I wrote his name as "Theodore I" IOTL even though there was no Theodore II, so my assumption is that Corsican royal naming convention ITTL is to use the ordinal even if there has not yet been a second monarch of that name. "Frederick I" is thus correct even if we never see another Frederick on the throne.

Henry (or Heinrich) is a well-established dynastic name, appearing in the names of both Theodore I (Theodor Heinrich Nicetius Steffan) and Federico I (Friedrich Wilhelm Franz Heinrich), but the specific permutation Arrigo is certainly an innovation.

Baptismal names would be in Latin and thus Henry, Heinrich, and Enrico would all be rendered as Henricus, but Theo's son's baptismal name is actually Arrigus, the medieval Latin form of Arrigo, so there's a case to be made that it really shouldn't be "Henry." Compare Amerigo, as in Amerigo Vespucci, which is basically the same name (equivalent to German Haimerich or Emmerich) but likewise isn't usually translated into an English form (as last time I checked I don't live in "The United States of Henrica" or "Emmerica").
 
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They also contrasted in disposition - unlike Theo’s generally agreeable personality, Carlo had a restless intensity to him. He was talkative and had a curious mind, but was also prickly, argumentative, impatient, and easily bored (unless something interested him, in which case he could not be pried away from it).

Liechtenstein thought him an intelligent young man and praised his work ethic in particular. Given his status and connections, Carlo could have easily avoided any real duties, but instead he pored over every report and treatise Liechtenstein could give him and dutifully observed every maneuver and evolution of Liechtenstein’s cavalry on the parade grounds. Liechtenstein may have taken Carlo on merely out of familial obligation, but he soon came to rely on Carlo as an aide.

Perhaps Carlo was industrious by nature or was just eager to prove himself worthy, but it probably helped that he did not have much else going for him in Vienna. Rather than succumbing to the allure of the big city like some stereotypical wide-eyed boy from the provinces, Carlo’s instinct was to define himself against it and make a virtue of austerity. He was famously a hater of opera, which was practically the national pastime of the Viennese elite, describing it as “dreadfully tedious” and a waste of time.
Potentially silly question, but are you writing Carlo as autistic? Or am I merely an autistic guy reading too much into things?
 
Theodore I wrote his name as "Theodore I" IOTL even though there was no Theodore II, so my assumption is that Corsican royal naming convention ITTL is to use the ordinal even if there has not yet been a second monarch of that name. "Frederick I" is thus correct even if we never see another Frederick on the throne.

Henry (or Heinrich) is a well-established dynastic name, appearing in the names of both Theodore I (Theodor Heinrich Nicetius Steffan) and Federico I (Friedrich Wilhelm Franz Heinrich), but the specific permutation Arrigo is certainly an innovation.

Baptismal names would be in Latin and thus Henry, Heinrich, and Enrico would all be rendered as Henricus, but Theo's son's baptismal name is actually Arrigus, the medieval Latin form of Arrigo, so there's a case to be made that it really shouldn't be "Henry." Compare Amerigo, as in Amerigo Vespucci, which is basically the same name (equivalent to German Haimerich or Emmerich) but likewise isn't usually translated into an English form (as last time I checked I don't live in "The United States of Henrica" or "Emmerica").
That's interesting, though I do like that little quirk of things, even if I imagine in cultures more used to a single example not having an ordinal just calling him Frederick of Corsica for example.

I see, didn't realize Henry was a dynastic name. As for the Arrigo thing, it would largely depend on whether Corsica continues to be its own independent country and how historically relevant such figures are. I could definitely see the Anglosphere continuing to call him and other Arrigos Henrys during much of the 20th century and the name Arrigo being more used in this world's recent time, given what I have seen in the last few decades OTL of using the actual home language name of historical figures. Though, if Corsica as a country gets subsumed in the next century or two and doesn't make it to modern day I could easily see Anglosphere scholars continue to just use Henry instead of Arrigo, though I am sure one pedant or the other will argue with your own Amerigo/Arrigo argument.
 
Poor Carina, born in the wrong era and (probably) in the wrong body. If only she had the chance to girlboss around prove her place in Corsica's future
 
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Laura’s polar opposite (and occasional rival) was the king’s eldest sister Maria Anna Caterina Lucia, known popularly as “Carina.” By this time it was clear that Princess Carina, who celebrated her 30th birthday in 1782, would never marry. After Federico’s death she had received one more proposal from Sigismondo Chigi della Rovere, the Prince of Farnese - a widower 16 years her senior - but while Theo gave his assent, he stressed that he would not make his sister marry against her will, and Carina declined the offer. Theo may have been pleased that he didn’t have to pay a dowry, but this did mean that he would have to support his sister financially for the rest of her life. Much to her delight, Theo appointed her as the colonel-in-chief of the Royal Dragoons, which not only gave her another excuse to wear military dress (not that she needed it) but also provided her with a salary.[3]

Carina was a controversial figure, and not just for choosing to remain unmarried.[4] She is perhaps most famous for her sartorial choices, being fond of masculine (and especially military) dress and wearing breeches when out of doors, although she always appeared at court in conventional clothing for a woman of her station and was usually depicted as such.[5] She had a quick wit and was the best linguist of the family, speaking Italian, French, German, Spanish, and English quite fluently. That wit was not always used for good, as Carina was notoriously sharp-tongued and could be downright cruel. She made a sport of inventing (usually unflattering) nicknames for everyone at court and mastered the art of the cutting remark. Count Ciavaldini, a frequent hunting companion of the king, remarked that the princess did not really respect anyone except “the king, her mother, and her horses.” Queen Laura thought her petty, crass, impious, and immature. In Carina’s defense, however, her society did not really give her a chance to use her intellect for anything more than her own amusement. Theo valued her insight and often solicited her advice, but nobody considered offering the king’s sister a government post.
QUEERDAR ACTIVATED
[4] Carina’s sexuality and gender identity have long been subjects of debate. She refused marriage and is not known to have had any romantic relationships with men, but nevertheless preferred male social company. In fact Carina seems to have disliked most (if not all) of the women in her life, declaring her general contempt for the ladies of court and bemoaning the “defects of our sex” in a letter to her brother. Then again, the social circle of Corsican court women was quite small, and virtually nobody within it shared Carina’s education, to say nothing of her interests or morals. Carina has often been described as a “tomboy,” but some more recent works have argued that she ought to be considered as transgender, pointing to her cross-dressing, preference for masculine hobbies and social roles, and some (admittedly rare) moments in her letters when she appears to speak of herself as a man, for instance describing herself as speaking "as one man to another” to a state minister.
Based on this, I'd suspect Carina was transgender and possibly aromantic.
 
Potentially silly question, but are you writing Carlo as autistic? Or am I merely an autistic guy reading too much into things?

I think that's a valid read on him, but I don't really write characters that way - I build a personality and go from there, although admittedly sometimes the personalities I construct are informed by "neurodivergent" people I know personally or have read about. The nice thing about writing historical characters is that the "true nature" of their personality can always be left ambiguous because of the ambiguous nature of historical sources IRL. Was Sartena autistic, or did he have ADHD, or was he just a smart but restless and irascible person who hated opera? I didn't really write him with a "correct answer" in mind, although I think there's definitely something nonstandard about how his brain works.

The same is true of Carina: I added a footnote about her sexuality/identity because I think that would probably be mentioned in an actual pop-historical text, but there is nothing in my notes which says "Carina is [insert identity here]." Most likely, as I suggested in the update, views of her would change over time. I think now she is likely to be seen as transgender (see, for instance, the recent academic debate about Elagabalus) but I don't think that's necessarily the only possible read on her. Perhaps she was simply drawn to certain aesthetics and hobbies that were seen as exclusively masculine in her day, and never became involved in any romantic relationships (that we know of) because to do so would have been too difficult or compromising given her position. Sometimes historical women (particularly elite women who had more agency over their own lives than most) didn't marry because it represented a loss of independence, and I think Carina is definitely someone who values her independence. Then again, "she was just a tomboy" might be criticized in a modern context as queer erasure (like historical lesbians being described as just really good friends).

When I first started constructing Federico's children, Carina and Theo were both originally designed as "facets" of Theodore's personality. Theo is charismatic and self-assured, while Carina is clever, unorthodox, and linguistically accomplished - all traits that were ascribed to Theodore I, but not all in the same person. Carlo, in contrast, was written to be more like Federico, who himself could potentially be read as having some sort of neurodivergence - his need to control and manage everything, his difficulty relating to people (except for his wife), and his innate suspiciousness of others which turned into paranoia in his last years. They're not the same people but Carlo is definitely more like his father than Theo is, which might be one reason why Theo doesn't really like him that much.

As an aside, it's probably for the best that Carina didn't pick Chigi della Rovere. Certainly he would have been an interesting husband; he was rich, cultured, creative, shared Carina's love of horses, and would probably have agreed with her on religious matters (he got in trouble for publishing an anonymous satire of the Papal conclave). But his OTL second marriage broke up amidst accusations of abuse and mistreatment, and he died in exile in 1793 after being convicted in absentia of hiring someone to poison a cardinal. (The trial may have been politically motivated, as the Roman government was lashing out against "radicals" in the context of the ongoing French revolution.) Chigi may or may not face the same fate ITTL, but the chances are pretty good that in a few years Carina is going to be reading about him in the news and thinking that she really dodged a bullet with that one.

That's interesting, though I do like that little quirk of things, even if I imagine in cultures more used to a single example not having an ordinal just calling him Frederick of Corsica for example.

I see, didn't realize Henry was a dynastic name. As for the Arrigo thing, it would largely depend on whether Corsica continues to be its own independent country and how historically relevant such figures are. I could definitely see the Anglosphere continuing to call him and other Arrigos Henrys during much of the 20th century and the name Arrigo being more used in this world's recent time, given what I have seen in the last few decades OTL of using the actual home language name of historical figures. Though, if Corsica as a country gets subsumed in the next century or two and doesn't make it to modern day I could easily see Anglosphere scholars continue to just use Henry instead of Arrigo, though I am sure one pedant or the other will argue with your own Amerigo/Arrigo argument.

"Frederick of Corsica" would be entirely valid, and indeed ITTL I think I've only ever referred to him as "King Federico," not "Federico I." This TL, after all, purports to be an English-language text, and thus may not always comply with Corsican royal naming conventions in Italian.

I haven't done much research on this, but it appears as though "Arrigo," having fallen into obscurity after the Middle Ages, had a bit of a renaissance in post-Risorgimento Italy - if you look at Italian Wikipedia's list of "people named Arrigo" virtually all of them are either medieval or were born in the late 19th century or afterwards, and the name is still used in Italy today (although it's definitely not common). Perhaps ITTL the name will enjoy an earlier revival.
 
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I like the royal children, each of them are unique in their own way but also rhyme with their predecessors. Can't wait to see how the family develops as it continues to grow and become more settled in European politics, by this point Theo isn't even 30 yet right?
 
Speaking of the family, makes me wonder who will be the lucky one to finally snag a great power wedding match. That will be the true indicator that the Neuhoffs have truly made it as a recognized royal family.
 
Would Austria be interested in a regiment of Corsican soldiers? Perhaps Carlo could raise one and become it’s colonel in Imperial service.
 
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Baptismal names would be in Latin and thus Henry, Heinrich, and Enrico would all be rendered as Henricus, but Theo's son's baptismal name is actually Arrigus, the medieval Latin form of Arrigo, so there's a case to be made that it really shouldn't be "Henry." Compare Amerigo, as in Amerigo Vespucci, which is basically the same name (equivalent to German Haimerich or Emmerich) but likewise isn't usually translated into an English form (as last time I checked I don't live in "The United States of Henrica" or "Emmerica").

Interesting. Could one make a case that it might be an latinized version of Argus instead?

I think that's a valid read on him, but I don't really write characters that way - I build a personality and go from there, although admittedly sometimes the personalities I construct are informed by "neurodivergent" people I know personally or have read about. The nice thing about writing historical characters is that the "true nature" of their personality can always be left ambiguous because of the ambiguous nature of historical sources IRL. Was Sartena autistic, or did he have ADHD, or was he just a smart but restless and irascible person who hated opera? I didn't really write him with a "correct answer" in mind, although I think there's definitely something nonstandard about how his brain works.

The same is true of Carina: I added a footnote about her sexuality/identity because I think that would probably be mentioned in an actual pop-historical text, but there is nothing in my notes which says "Carina is [insert identity here]." Most likely, as I suggested in the update, views of her would change over time. I think now she is likely to be seen as transgender (see, for instance, the recent academic debate about Elagabalus) but I don't think that's necessarily the only possible read on her. Perhaps she was simply drawn to certain aesthetics and hobbies that were seen as exclusively masculine in her day, and never became involved in any romantic relationships (that we know of) because to do so would have been too difficult or compromising given her position. Sometimes historical women (particularly elite women who had more agency over their own lives than most) didn't marry because it represented a loss of independence, and I think Carina is definitely someone who values her independence. Then again, "she was just a tomboy" might be criticized in a modern context as queer erasure (like historical lesbians being described as just really good friends).

When I first started constructing Federico's children, Carina and Theo were both originally designed as "facets" of Theodore's personality. Theo is charismatic and self-assured, while Carina is clever, unorthodox, and linguistically accomplished - all traits that were ascribed to Theodore I, but not all in the same person. Carlo, in contrast, was written to be more like Federico, who himself could potentially be read as having some sort of neurodivergence - his need to control and manage everything, his difficulty relating to people (except for his wife), and his innate suspiciousness of others which turned into paranoia in his last years. They're not the same people but Carlo is definitely more like his father than Theo is, which might be one reason why Theo doesn't really like him that much.

For my money, this is a far better way of writing or indeed viewing people. The modern trend of trying to stick people into boxes, especially when said boxes have come into fashion quite recently, is at best tiresome and simplistic when applied to major historical figures.
 
Would Austria be interested in a regiment of Corsican soldiers? Perhaps Carlo could raise one and become it’s colonel in Imperial service.

Austria wasn't really in the practice of raising foreign regiments at this time, and certainly not from outside the Empire. Unlike Britain or Savoy, their limiting factor was money, not manpower. Although commissions were sold in the Austrian army, from what I can tell the position of inhaber (colonel-proprietor) of an Austrian regiment was usually something granted to a general as recognition of their service.

It was possible for princely officers in 18th century armies to rise incredibly quickly. Consider Albrecht of Brunswick, the younger brother of the reigning Duke of Brunswick, who was made a captain in his brother's proprietary grenadier regiment and sent off to fight the Turks in 1738 at the age of 13 (!), became a captain of the Danish Life-Guards at 18, temporarily joined the British army in the Netherlands as a "volunteer" and was made a lieutenant-colonel there at 19, joined the Prussian army at 20 as the inhaber of his brother's old regiment, and then died at the Battle of Soor in 1745 as a twenty year old Prussian major-general. But this is the 1780s, not the 1740s, the Neuhoffs are not as politically or militarily important as the Guelfs of Brunswick, and while Albrecht already had seven years of military experience by the age of 20, Carlo has none. Albrecht's brief career was also during a period of near-constant war in Europe, whereas Carlo is in a peacetime army - for now, anyway.

Interesting. Could one make a case that it might be an latinized version of Argus instead?

No, it's definitely a Henry/Enrico variant, it's just that it seems to sometimes receive its own Latinization as Arrigus rather than Henricus. When Emperor Henry VII made his descent into Italy, for instance, he was known popularly there as Arrigo. What can I say, pre-modern spelling was inconsistent...
 
Austria wasn't really in the practice of raising foreign regiments at this time, and certainly not from outside the Empire. Unlike Britain or Savoy, their limiting factor was money, not manpower. Although commissions were sold in the Austrian army, from what I can tell the position of inhaber (colonel-proprietor) of an Austrian regiment was usually something granted to a general as recognition of their service.

It was possible for princely officers in 18th century armies to rise incredibly quickly. Consider Albrecht of Brunswick, the younger brother of the reigning Duke of Brunswick, who was made a captain in his brother's proprietary grenadier regiment and sent off to fight the Turks in 1738 at the age of 13 (!), became a captain of the Danish Life-Guards at 18, temporarily joined the British army in the Netherlands as a "volunteer" and was made a lieutenant-colonel there at 19, joined the Prussian army at 20 as the inhaber of his brother's old regiment, and then died at the Battle of Soor in 1745 as a twenty year old Prussian major-general. But this is the 1780s, not the 1740s, the Neuhoffs are not as politically or militarily important as the Guelfs of Brunswick, and while Albrecht already had seven years of military experience by the age of 20, Carlo has none. Albrecht's brief career was also during a period of near-constant war in Europe, whereas Carlo is in a peacetime army - for now, anyway.



No, it's definitely a Henry/Enrico variant, it's just that it seems to sometimes receive its own Latinization as Arrigus rather than Henricus. When Emperor Henry VII made his descent into Italy, for instance, he was known popularly there as Arrigo. What can I say, pre-modern spelling was inconsistent...
Were the Corsicans not considered something alike modern Swiss guards at this point in time?In your story, they were seen as a highly martial people by foreigners. Even the Habsburgs had a regiment of Swiss guards IOTL.

Anyway, didn’t Eugene of Savoy’s older brother become a colonel-proprietor as soon as he entered Austrian service?
 
Were the Corsicans not considered something alike modern Swiss guards at this point in time?In your story, they were seen as a highly martial people by foreigners. Even the Habsburgs had a regiment of Swiss guards IOTL.

Sure, but there's just not that many of them - nearly 2 million Swiss compared to maybe 160k Corsicans - and in any case, Austria had their own "martial people" to recruit from on the Military Frontier. I haven't yet seen an example in this period of an Austrian regiment recruiting principally from non-Austrian territory. The Austrians "leased" units wholesale from Austrian client states like Tuscany and Modena during the SYW, but that's not quite the same thing.

I'm unfamiliar with the career of Eugene of Savoy's brother, but that's a century removed from where we are ITTL, and there's a huge difference between the Austrian army of Eugene's day and the one that existed at the dawn of the French Revolutionary Wars.
 
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Now that I think of it, given that Corsica is an island nation but the people are traditionally pastorialist and used to fighting/living in rough terrain like highlands. Could Corsica eventually have Corsican marines who excel at amphibious landings in rough terrain? North Africa's coastline is pretty hilly and mountainous like Corsica itself, the Corsicans could likely excel fighting there almost as much as at home besides the fact they've never fought in North Africa before. Just think Corsicans leading the vanguard of a joint landing with American forces near let's say Algiers or Tunis would be interesting. If a little implausible given their small numbers and poor funding.
 
Yeah, I think a Hesse-Kassel model is quite possible for Corsica and have before said I felt Corsica's military would probably be a bit larger than Carp suggested especially given how Frederico is portrayed. However, lets be real, there is only really one power to do that with. The British. They are the infinite money-bags people. Which means despite the ways they may have ideological similarities, the odds of Corsican 'Hessians' in New York would be decent realistically although that didn't happen here.
 
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