Keynes' Cruisers Volume 2

Story 2546
The Northwest Pacific Ocean, 1924 May 14, 1944

The Avenger from the Wasp ducked back into the cloud. The radio operator was already double checking their position. He would soon be sending an updated spotting message to the fleet. Three Japanese carriers and at least two of the massive battleships that were at Makassar had been spotted a minute ago. The roving fighter patrols had made a single pass, thankfully shooting long and below the lumbering scout before a friendly cloud gave them the chance to send a signal. Over the next seven minutes, two more messages were sent. The first was sent to the carrier and an acknowledgement was received from an airborne Avenger from Enterprise that had been acting as a radio relay. The second set of messages were sent to the other scouts. As they completed their legs, they would be converging on the identified enemy concentration. Even before the last scout began their turn to attack, a cruiser was listing from half a dozen 500 pound bomb hits.
 
The Northwest Pacific Ocean, 1924 May 14, 1944

The Avenger from the Wasp ducked back into the cloud. The radio operator was already double checking their position. He would soon be sending an updated spotting message to the fleet. Three Japanese carriers and at least two of the massive battleships that were at Makassar had been spotted a minute ago. The roving fighter patrols had made a single pass, thankfully shooting long and below the lumbering scout before a friendly cloud gave them the chance to send a signal. Over the next seven minutes, two more messages were sent. The first was sent to the carrier and an acknowledgement was received from an airborne Avenger from Enterprise that had been acting as a radio relay. The second set of messages were sent to the other scouts. As they completed their legs, they would be converging on the identified enemy concentration. Even before the last scout began their turn to attack, a cruiser was listing from half a dozen 500 pound bomb hits.
the death ride of the yamato only this time its whatever remains of the Imperial fleet?
 

Driftless

Donor
The Northwest Pacific Ocean, 1924 May 14, 1944

The Avenger from the Wasp ducked back into the cloud. The radio operator was already double checking their position. He would soon be sending an updated spotting message to the fleet. Three Japanese carriers and at least two of the massive battleships that were at Makassar had been spotted a minute ago. The roving fighter patrols had made a single pass, thankfully shooting long and below the lumbering scout before a friendly cloud gave them the chance to send a signal. Over the next seven minutes, two more messages were sent. The first was sent to the carrier and an acknowledgement was received from an airborne Avenger from Enterprise that had been acting as a radio relay. The second set of messages were sent to the other scouts. As they completed their legs, they would be converging on the identified enemy concentration. Even before the last scout began their turn to attack, a cruiser was listing from half a dozen 500 pound bomb hits.
How far away from the US Fleet, approximately?
 

Driftless

Donor
At the very edge of striking range at this time and heading east south east at 18 knots.
So, by the time a strike group gets prepped, launched, and organized over their carriers, then it should be within reasonable range for one (or more?) strikes?

Also, have the Japanese located the US fleet?
 
So, by the time a strike group gets prepped, launched, and organized over their carriers, then it should be within reasonable range for one (or more?) strikes?

Also, have the Japanese located the US fleet?
The Japanese have a very good general idea of where the US carrier task force is. Land based aircraft had launched mid-day strikes to little effect.
 
So, by the time a strike group gets prepped, launched, and organized over their carriers, then it should be within reasonable range for one (or more?) strikes?

Also, have the Japanese located the US fleet?

I think a better question is: even if they do know where they are, what can their air wings possibly do that’s remotely constructive at this point besides dying for their emperor. Three carriers vs the Essex and Independence Pez dispenser. The only things stopping the Yamato’s dying right away is the fact that the first strike will focus on the carriers unless their air wings are judged no threat.
 
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The Northwest Pacific Ocean, 1924 May 14, 1944

The Avenger from the Wasp ducked back into the cloud. The radio operator was already double checking their position. He would soon be sending an updated spotting message to the fleet. Three Japanese carriers and at least two of the massive battleships that were at Makassar had been spotted a minute ago. The roving fighter patrols had made a single pass, thankfully shooting long and below the lumbering scout before a friendly cloud gave them the chance to send a signal. Over the next seven minutes, two more messages were sent. The first was sent to the carrier and an acknowledgement was received from an airborne Avenger from Enterprise that had been acting as a radio relay. The second set of messages were sent to the other scouts. As they completed their legs, they would be converging on the identified enemy concentration. Even before the last scout began their turn to attack, a cruiser was listing from half a dozen 500 pound bomb hits.

Which US admiral is in charge of this fleet right now?
 
Fester, what are the frontlines on the eastern front are they going push the germans back to the pre war border or are we taking about the mid 1943 otl frontlines/
 
North of Caen, 1535 May 14, 1944

A dozen Shermans began to move. Four of the American tanks had been converted to the Firefly configuration. The troop had taken losses from the beach to the bunker complex that had been holding up the inland exploitation of the infantry since noon time. Engineers with flame throwers had been diverted from their other tasks to help the inland march. Now the mortars attached to the Suffolk battalion at the spearhead of the division were chucking a thick smoke screen for the tanks to maneuver to a slightly exposed flank. As they were moving, half a dozen Typhoons came in low. Their quad cannons chewed up the ground in front of the Hussars while a mixture of napalm canisters and high explosives showered the German position with death and chaos. The squaddies began to advance a few dozen yards in front of the tanks as the engineers began to blow holes in the wire and lanes in the anti-tank and anti-personnel minefields. Two batteries of 25 pounders began to fire a mixture of smoke and high explosive. Any German defender who was outside of the bunkers was either dying or lying as close to the dirt as they could manage.

Machine guns began to send bursts of steel out to the fields and in to the bunker complex. An anti-tank gun was trying to engage shadows and sounds hiding in the smoke. Riflemen were advancing under the cover of a bewildering array of machine guns. Soon the Shermans emerged from the smoke. The Fireflies with their high velocity cannon attempted to breach bunkers while the regular Shermans used high explosive shells and machine gun fire to break up impromptu counter-attacks and keep the Germans immobile as the infantry threw grenades into fox holes and the engineers attached multi-stone satchel charges to bunkers.

By tea time, the medics were crawling over the complex as only two bunkers that were not able to cover or impede the road remained to be taken. One company of the Suffolks would remain to deal with the hold-outs while the rest of the battalion continued south.
So going off one month earlier than in the original timeline, off one fewer beach, against Germans not so attrited by Russia, they might manage to take a day one objective (Caen) on day one which it took two months to take in the original timeline?
This timeline is really showing up some of the original timeline operations and what they had (commanders, equipment, troop numbers & morale) to work with. :)

Good work! :)
 
So going off one month earlier than in the original timeline, off one fewer beach, against Germans not so attrited by Russia, they might manage to take a day one objective (Caen) on day one which it took two months to take in the original timeline?
This timeline is really showing up some of the original timeline operations and what they had (commanders, equipment, troop numbers & morale) to work with. :)

Good work! :)
Don't forget they are also hitting the south of France at the same time in this timeline. Or at least they should be given how everything is described so I would love to see a map showing all the landing locations.
 
So going off one month earlier than in the original timeline, off one fewer beach, against Germans not so attrited by Russia, they might manage to take a day one objective (Caen) on day one which it took two months to take in the original timeline?
This timeline is really showing up some of the original timeline operations and what they had (commanders, equipment, troop numbers & morale) to work with. :)

Good work! :)
Although the tides were actually optimum on June 5/6 for a landing, May's tides were good enough but not as good as those in June.
 
@fester - hi quick question as we're about to see the groundwar heat up on the continent again what does the standard German, US and UK/Commenwealth armoured and inf division look like.

We've had a large numbers of butterflies before and during TTL which have impacted:
Industrial outputs - what's being made and where is it going
Manpower - how many guys do we have left to split between the home front and the PBI
'lessons learned' - has there been the same series of events to lead to institutional outputs e.g. British by war end putting everyone and their mother in a tank, then putting that tank inside another tank.

the discussion over Caen is throwing up some flags in terms of what are these guys bringing to the party at the local/tactical level which is different to OTL.
 
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Story 2547
Northwest of Saint Tropez, France 1643 May 14, 1944

A dozen Panzers were burning. They had bowled through a light line of scouts mounted in jeeps and motorcycles. Machine guns had scattered the screen forty minutes ago but they did not kill their greatest threat. Half a dozen radiomen had started to call in first warnings and then artillery corrections. Three French cruisers supported a pair of American battleships in stripping the impromptu battlegroup built around a reinforced company of nearly obsolete Panzers from the four hundred and fifty infantrymen that would have allowed the tanks to get stuck in with the French infantry. As artillery shells released butterfly patterns of steel scythes, the riflemen who had been riding on top of the tanks were some of the first casualties, and the riflemen who were guiding the tanks through any impromptu minefields and ambushes soon were either bleeding into the earth or attempting to become part of the earth as they dug in with shovels, knives, helmets and their hands. By the time that the artillery was called off as it was danger close to the lead French companies, the attack had already been broken up with a trio of Panzers stuck on the trails as near misses and shrapnel ripped tracks off their bogies and a single eight inch shell was barely slowed when it went through the turret face of the attack commander's tank. Half a dozen M-10s began to fire at nearly point-blank range even as the French infantry used their bazookas to hold their ground.

When the Germans attempted to fall back, the artillery resumed their rains of destruction. The road off the coast would soon be cleared.
 
Story 2548
Northwest Pacific, 2254 May 14, 1944

USS Archerfish shuddered for the last time. Ten torpedoes were in the water. Six were swimming towards the big bastard closest to them, and four more at a heavy cruiser not much further away. Water entered her tanks and her nose pointed down as the skipper sought safety in the murky deep.
 
Northwest Pacific, 2254 May 14, 1944

USS Archerfish shuddered for the last time. Ten torpedoes were in the water. Six were swimming towards the big bastard closest to them, and four more at a heavy cruiser not much further away. Water entered her tanks and her nose pointed down as the skipper sought safety in the murky deep.
OTL she did not make any sinking's in her first 4 patrols - her 5th being somewhat more successful in that she famously sank the Shinano - the largest ship ever sunk by a submarine on the 28th Nov 1944.

I wonder who she has chanced across here?
 
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