Ireland as a Taiwan for some fallen English or British regime

How could there be a situation where a government that is defeated in the British Isles East ends up fleeing west into Ireland? Some potential ideas for discussion:

1. Royalists do that. Okay, they would prefer France, but what if Ireland is poised to be a military stronghold that's more strategically beneficial as a staging ground for a restoration?

2. Retreat from the Spanish Armada

3. Retreat from the Armada of 1779, when the British were against both the Spanish and the French

4. Some sort of Napoleonic flight

5. Alternatively, go back earlier in history and have a fallen Scottish regime fleeing back to their Celtic cousins.
 
Have James II bunker down in Ireland. If luck happens to be on his side, then it will be quite difficult for William the Usurper to dislodge him from there.
 
I'd be interested in a Jacobite Ireland as well, though I guess it requires a French wank to protect them from the encroaching British.
 
A communist revolution in the United Kingdom, perhaps? Of course, depending on the point of divergence, it might be restricted to Northern Ireland, but still.
 
For most of history, England was massively wealthier than Ireland. By the time Ireland started to close that gap, England had ten times the population. There isn't a scenario where England can't just easily invade Ireland and clear out the problem regime. If there is a foreign power strong enough to project power into Ireland, then that foreign power can replace the government of England.
 
For most of history, England was massively wealthier than Ireland. By the time Ireland started to close that gap, England had ten times the population. There isn't a scenario where England can't just easily invade Ireland and clear out the problem regime. If there is a foreign power strong enough to project power into Ireland, then that foreign power can replace the government of England.
Maybe a power that wants to keep the Isles divided? France for instance might prefer an Irish proxy state over the Stuarts returning to London.
 
The RoC survived in Taiwan because the PRC did not have significant naval capability, and because the US with its overwhelming naval power protected the RoC.

Any English or British state will have substantial naval power, and it would be highly unlikely that any third party could project enough naval power into British waters to protect Ireland from Britain.

However, let's go wild.

During WW I, Germany invents tanks, dive bombers, and torpedo bombers. In 1917, Germany observes the February Revolution and concludes that Russia is busted and be ignored. But the US has just declared war, so Germany decides to crush France and Britain before the US can intervene.

Germany unleashes a massive new tank force and rips open the Western Front in May; France collapses and the BEF is also destroyed by July.

Supported by dive bombers and torpedo bombers, the German High Seas Fleet moves to the Channel and covers the German invasion of Britain. Most of the Royal Navy is lost in a desperate attempt to stop or cut off the invasion, due to the new German aircraft, but the High Seas Fleet takes very heavy losses as well. With most of the British Army lost in France or deployed overseas, and with tanks spearheading the German drive, the Germans conquer Britain by October.

The British government, together with many troops and civilian refugees, withdraws to Ireland. (Assume no Easter Rising.) The US had begun sending troops and ships to Europe; after the fall of Britain, the US Navy prevents Germany from invading Ireland.

The United Kingdom survives as a rump state in Ireland.
 
Beside the Jacobite option,you could have Henry III losing his throne to Louis the Lion for good and the Plantagenet loyalists re allocating to Ireland.
 
For most of history, England was massively wealthier than Ireland. By the time Ireland started to close that gap, England had ten times the population. There isn't a scenario where England can't just easily invade Ireland and clear out the problem regime. If there is a foreign power strong enough to project power into Ireland, then that foreign power can replace the government of England.
The English almost went bankrupt during the Elizabethan conquest of Ireland and came close to losing until the Battle of Kinsale went wrong for the Irish, and that was with much of Ireland under their control and many of the Irish nobility submitting to them. They would have a much harder time than you suggest invading a completely separate Ireland.
 
Despite British naval supremacy, aren't amphibious invasions inherently difficult? That's why England itself has been so hard to invade, after all.
 
I would think it would have to due to an internal split as if it's as a result of a foreign invasion then if the invader can reach Great Britain by sea they should also be able to transport forces to Ireland.
 
The English almost went bankrupt during the Elizabethan conquest of Ireland and came close to losing until the Battle of Kinsale went wrong for the Irish, and that was with much of Ireland under their control and many of the Irish nobility submitting to them. They would have a much harder time than you suggest invading a completely separate Ireland.
While the Kinsale Part is true, the bankruptcy part is a common misconception that always makes me sigh. The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland was crippling to the economy of the Kingdom of Ireland, and to further the economic interests of the Conquest and to cement English control of the region, the English Parliament and Elizabeth I knew that a stable economy was needed in Ireland. As such, the Kingdom of Ireland's economic debts were taken up by the Kingdom of England, and later on partially by the Kingdom of Scotland. On a sheer comparisonary note the annual revenue of the Kingdom of Ireland on average from 1575 - 1605 was around 10,000 to 25,000 pounds a year, whilst the 9 Years War cost a total of around ~120,000 Pounds. To the Kingdom of Ireland, that was crippling. However, the average revenue of England during the same period of was around ~200,000 to ~300,000 pounds a year. The Elizabethan Conquest came nowhere near bankrupting England. Shouldering Ireland's debt was the cause of restlessness in Parliament at the time partially because Irish debt suddenly made up 65% of all English debt which forced James I & VI to pass some of the debt to Scotland, partially because nearly a third of the Elizabethan force were Scottish loaned out to England.
 
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