Industrial consequences of France controlling west bank of the Rhine?

This is a follow-up to one of my previous threads, where I inquired about the linguistic consequences of a France that achieves their "natural borders". Here is a map for reference:
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As we know, the Rhineland of OTL went on to become Germany's industrial heartland and one of the primary economic engines of the European continent. To how severe a degree could the region's annexation by France impact its future industrial development? Could it still reach the heights it did in OTL? Does this France replace OTL Germany as the continent's foremost industrial power?
 
As we know, the Rhineland of OTL went on to become Germany's industrial heartland and one of the primary economic engines of the European continent.
That's true, but the most important part of that industrial heartland is the Rhur region on the eastern side.
To how severe a degree could the region's annexation by France impact its future industrial development? Could it still reach the heights it did in OTL?
I don't think it could reach the same heights, but it could still reach very high indeed. Germany would (still) fight for industrial primacy in Europe with Britain and France. The rhineland would develop differently ; the western rhineland would be more connected to Wallonia and Northern France (Hauts de France) and together they would form the biggest industrial basin in Europe. Some kind of treaty for free trade along the Rhine is likely to happen sooner rather than later.
Does this France replace OTL Germany as the continent's foremost industrial power?
I believe so, but not by a wide margin. With Belgium ressources and the border on the Rhine, France would be a scary beast but Germany industrial potential keeps it a peer power (or the tier just below that).

That being said, this is far from my area of expertise so take what I say with a grain of salt.
 
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France looks good like that, and it gives Germany more of a German looking face like a woman holding her head up, if you go with the border they have to the east.
 
If the two countries remain hostile to each other, as seems likely, then Napoleon might do something to inhibit German use of the Rhine itself as a route for moving goods.
 
They would be very even in all likelihood, Belgium and Lorain for France, rurh and Silesia for Germany
 
I remember reading that a major weakness of the French economy in the industrial revolution was a dearth of domestic coal. With the Saarland and Wallonia solidly French, this could lead to a far more confident and wealthier France in the 19th century.

Also I can’t imagine how traumatising it must be for pan-German nationalism that France occupies the Rhine. A poorer less industrialised Prussia might not be able to dominate Germany like she did in OTL, which could halt the birth of Germany for a very good while
 
When does France gain these territories? It's important, because Germany might not even become a reality, depending on the PoD. For example an allied Westphalia controlling the Ruhr could boost France even further if there is sufficient industrial cooperation. France will always want buffer states between her and Austria/Prussia.
 
When does France gain these territories? It's important, because Germany might not even become a reality, depending on the PoD. For example an allied Westphalia controlling the Ruhr could boost France even further if there is sufficient industrial cooperation. France will always want buffer states between her and Austria/Prussia.
One option is Napoleon accepting the Frankfurt proposals offered to him after the Battle of Leipzig. It would be a bitter pill for him to swallow, but long-term with industrialization it would have been quite advantageous to France.
 
One option is Napoleon accepting the Frankfurt proposals offered to him after the Battle of Leipzig. It would be a bitter pill for him to swallow, but long-term with industrialization it would have been quite advantageous to France.
As far as I've understood, Napoleon wanted a Rhine border to further his policy of a strong offense being the best defense, i.e the border was supposed to be porous enough that any conflict France ended up in could reliably be brought to the right bank in Germany instead of fought in French territory. If the Ruhr becomes the designated boxing ring for any squabble France will have (most likely with Prussia or any other German state keen on unification) it might make early industrialists less keen on placing their egg in such a shaky basket. Then again, economic patterns are surprisingly resilient to political changes.
 
Mhmm having your most profitable and wealthiest territories on the frontier is a mixed bag imo, for one the logistics are good as you're within easy reach of manpower, supplies and transport links; it's not hard to motivate soldiers to fight hard for their core homeland; and usually the wealthy citizens who live there would happily give you as much support and political capital to do with whatever you want.

However, you're absolutely forced to defend it which can be very hard to work around for maneuver warfare, any step back is going to be a painfully expensive one, the enemy doesn't need to beat you to score victory; they can turn artillery shells towards economic and civilian targets.
If the Ruhr becomes the designated boxing ring for any squabble France will have (most likely with Prussia or any other German state keen on unification) it might make early industrialists less keen on placing their egg in such a shaky basket.
The main advantages of the Ruhr were; within easy reach of good coal and iron deposit, pre-existing manufactories (Krupp and Essen), the Rhine waterways made transport into and out of Germany very easy. I think the advantages of the Rhur ensures that it'll be strong industrial center but I think we might see Silesia or Brandenburg be the premier industrial center of Germany as that has similar advantages and wouldn't be so much on the border
 
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