George V dies in 1892

If Victoria considered May complete to marry Eddy / George who were heirs to a powerful imperative, why she did not care May integral to Ernest, who was a governor of a very small and very good state German state?
 
The Hannovers were not exactly popular in England and they were German Princes before being English Dukes so same problem of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha plus the fact who Victoria likely had not a great relationship with them....
I did not know that the Hanover were not well-seen in England, but I remember reading that May considered going to Mary Princess Royal with a Prince Hanover before he married Victoria Louise
 
Actually wrong nephew it was the King of Denmark who apparently ordered his aunt to turn off the lights. When in England Marie Feodorovna usually stayed with her sister Alexandra at Marlborough House or Sandringham - though she spent most of her time in Denmark.

My bad for getting the nephews mixed up. I remembered reading the story but I couldn't remember the details, I guess I thought George V seemed like a fusspot enough to fit.
 
If Victoria considered May complete to marry Eddy / George who were heirs to a powerful imperative, why she did not care May integral to Ernest, who was a governor of a very small and very good state German state?

The issue was whatever Victoria thought - her influence couldn't and wouldn't have obliterated May's family background - before the Queen decided May would marry Eddie she had mentioned her as a potential bride in Germany and it was made clear that her birth into a morganatic house would hinder her prospects.
 
The issue was whatever Victoria thought - her influence couldn't and wouldn't have obliterated May's family background - before the Queen decided May would marry Eddie she had mentioned her as a potential bride in Germany and it was made clear that her birth into a morganatic house would hinder her prospects.
It is well to remember that Vitoria of Hesse (Ernest sister) married a Battenberg, just like Beatrice. His daughters married respectively the King of Sweden and the King of Spain. The Battenbergs also had morganatic blood and married well, it would not be impossible for May to marry well even though Eddy did not have a husband.
 
In Victoria's case it was a love match - and her father wasn't very happy with the marriage partially because he would lose her as her husband had made his life in Britain (where the matter of his birth was irrelevant) - interesting her own father's second marriage at the same time to his divorced aristocratic mistress met with so much opposition that he had to divorce her.

Her daughter's marriage to the King of Sweden did provoke considerable discussion about if it met with the succession rules of the Kingdom of Sweden - in the end Sweden accepted Britain's explanation of Lady Louise Mountbatten's position within the British Royal Family (where her morganatic background was irrelevant as she had always been in the British succession) and said the marriage would be valid.

Again Beatrice's marriage was largely influenced by her mother's desire to keep her at home. In the case of the King of Spain - Alfonso fell in love with Ena - his mother wasn't best pleased due to Ena's paternal background - which was one reason why Edward VII was happy to raise her rank to Royal Highness before the wedding.

As I said earlier May's background would make it hard (I didn't say impossible) for her to marry into a reigning European house - it would most likely need to be a love match because she offers little in the way of connections (being only the great granddaughter of a British sovereign in the female line) and has no money to gloss over her paternal background.
 
In Victoria's case it was a love match - and her father wasn't very happy with the marriage partially because he would lose her as her husband had made his life in Britain (where the matter of his birth was irrelevant) - interesting her own father's second marriage at the same time to his divorced aristocratic mistress met with so much opposition that he had to divorce her.

Her daughter's marriage to the King of Sweden did provoke considerable discussion about if it met with the succession rules of the Kingdom of Sweden - in the end Sweden accepted Britain's explanation of Lady Louise Mountbatten's position within the British Royal Family (where her morganatic background was irrelevant as she had always been in the British succession) and said the marriage would be valid.

Again Beatrice's marriage was largely influenced by her mother's desire to keep her at home. In the case of the King of Spain - Alfonso fell in love with Ena - his mother wasn't best pleased due to Ena's paternal background - which was one reason why Edward VII was happy to raise her rank to Royal Highness before the wedding.

As I said earlier May's background would make it hard (I didn't say impossible) for her to marry into a reigning European house - it would most likely need to be a love match because she offers little in the way of connections (being only the great granddaughter of a British sovereign in the female line) and has no money to gloss over her paternal background.
The problems about Lady Louise Mountbatten's wedding would never be raised if she was still HSH Princess Louise of Battenberg as she was born
 
The problems about Lady Louise Mountbatten's wedding would never be raised if she was still HSH Princess Louise of Battenberg as she was born

The issue raised in the Swedish media and government at the time was because the Swedish law forbade the succession to someone who married a commoner or private citizen - the government explained that meant someone not born into a royal family or a family equal to that - so Battenburg or Mountbatten it would have still prompted debate as Battenburg would not have counted as being someone born into a royal house - Louise's marriage treaty refers to her as a member of the British Royal House (which she was through her grandmother Alice) which was a bit of a stretch but would have satisfied the Swedish rules.
 
The issue raised in the Swedish media and government at the time was because the Swedish law forbade the succession to someone who married a commoner or private citizen - the government explained that meant someone not born into a royal family or a family equal to that - so Battenburg or Mountbatten it would have still prompted debate as Battenburg would not have counted as being someone born into a royal house - Louise's marriage treaty refers to her as a member of the British Royal House (which she was through her grandmother Alice) which was a bit of a stretch but would have satisfied the Swedish rules.

Didn't St. James' also have ro send a list of precedence at court to Stockholm to prove that Louise wasn't just a nobody?

Also, with Ena it was a case of even though Edward VII gave her a promotion to HRH the wording of thetreaty said "don't come running back to us [England] when the situation in Spain goes sideways", wasn't it?
 
The issue raised in the Swedish media and government at the time was because the Swedish law forbade the succession to someone who married a commoner or private citizen - the government explained that meant someone not born into a royal family or a family equal to that - so Battenburg or Mountbatten it would have still prompted debate as Battenburg would not have counted as being someone born into a royal house - Louise's marriage treaty refers to her as a member of the British Royal House (which she was through her grandmother Alice) which was a bit of a stretch but would have satisfied the Swedish rules.
A morganatic branch of a Royal family had a similar rank to a mediatized house so a Battenberg, being an HSH would be looked down a little but was neither a commoner or a private citizen as a match with her would be counted as equal. The problem of Louise, who was born as princess, but lost her title during the WWI, was who being simply Lady Louise and the daughter of a Marquess do not gave her anymore the required rank (who she had as princess of Battenberg) so they needed an alternative solution
 
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