For Want of A Sandwich - A Franz Ferdinand Lives Wikibox TL

Ankole
Ankole.jpg
 
How big is Neo-Kemitism? Is it big in Egypt or is it more of a "sub-Saharan" phenomenon?
Neo-Kemitism is not at all big in Egypt. It's a modern creation owed to Wallace D. Fard, US emigrant to Liberia (better known as Wallace Fard Muhammad, founder of the Nation of Islam), giving a spiritual sense to Pan-Africanism : as Egypt is the cradle of civilization and Egypt is in Africa, the only way to have a religion free of Western, colonialist influences is to return to the cult of Egyptian gods. The mainstream don't mummify themselves, nor do they build pyramids (the majority, I SAID), it's a version of Egyptian mythology as seen in the 1920s-30s and watered down, as it's quite monotheistic in practice, one choose a god to pray to and there is as much as Cults as you want. As I said, in the mainstream.
I’d like to request a list of the Presidents of Chile, if that is possible. Thanks. :)
It's duly noted !
 

This one's a lot of fun, and you can't expect it to pass without me commenting on it:

1936 - Lang, presumably, is the earliest on this list of many directors who do not leave Germany for Hollywood.
1938 - Riefenstahl gets to make her masterpiece during the height of her career, undistracted by the OTL Nazi propaganda pictures that made her famous instead.
1941 - Instead of Citizen Kane, we get Welles' originally intended adaptation of the Conrad classic. It's a movie I'd love to see just to see if he could have pulled it off.
1956-59: Douglas Sirk makes his melodramas in Germany, does he? I'm curious about how to make Imitation of Life work as a German-made film - it's an adaptation of a previously-existing American film, and the plot is American to the core.
1960: Herr Wilder's film is the first on this list to, IOTL, win Best Picture at the Academy Awards. Like Imitation of Life, The Apartment just seems so "American" to me, but I suppose Germany would also have a burgeoning post-war white-collar middle class too, so it still works.
1963: I will presume Grant is made in lieu of Ford's contributions to How the West Was Won. The timing of this - during the height of the OTL Civil Rights movement - is hard to ignore. IOTL Harry Morgan, mostly a television star (Bill Gannon on Dragnet and Colonel Potter on M*A*S*H) played Grant in How the West Was Won, but obviously John Wayne ought to play Grant in a proper biopic directed by John Ford.
1969: Kubrick's Napoleon is obviously an ATL picture close to my own heart. Looks like the timing is such that it would beat Bondarchuk's Waterloo to the screen ITTL, although assuming he also made 2001 it's hard to imagine Kubrick turning the picture around in that short a time-frame.
1972: The Day the Clown Cried? You went there, you madman, you went there. Classic MaskedPickle!
1975: ITTL Forman adapts The Jungle Book instead of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and does so in his native Bohemia. I do hope for the sake of good taste he finds a young actor from the Indian subcontinent to play the lead.
1979: The film Scott would have directed had he not been inspired by Star Wars. Is it wrong that I like to imagine a TL where Scott went the James Ivory route?
1980: Truffaut directing The Elephant Man instead of Lynch. Speaking of, very surprised to not see an adaptation of Dune on here, whether by Lynch or Jodorowsky or anyone else.
1981: Interesting that ITTL the title is translated into English when IOTL everyone calls it Das Boot.
1983: Given that we're still in the De Niro era, does he play Bill the Butcher? (Who died at 33 - De Niro was 40, more than old enough. Day-Lewis was in his early forties.) And which young pretty boy du jour plays Amsterdam?
1984: Amadeus is the second film on this list to have won Best Picture at the Oscars IOTL. A film made in Germany, it presumably would have been adapted from the German translation of the play (which IOTL premiered in 1981 in Berlin), with minimal involvement from Shaffer (who IOTL made many changes for the film). I can see one controversy emerging in how Mozart's accent will be depicted - Austrian being considered a "hick" or "hayseed" accent in Germany (proper) - which is why Arnold Schwarzenegger is dubbed in German despite being a native speaker. Forman still gets to direct, which pleases me.
1987: Not surprised by this one at all. You are of course depriving the lead, Bruno Ganz, of his greatest performance IOTL so it's nice to see his second-greatest performance receive high acclaim. Does Peter Falk still play the American celebrity? :p
1988: I suspect you're being too kind to Michael Cimino, though I note that his film was an international co-production...
1991: This is the part where we realize that in this world we lose all three of Lean's masterpieces - no Kwai, no Lawrence, no Zhivago :( What exactly did Lean do between 1955 and 1991 ITTL anyway? I mean, yes, probably a Mutiny on the Bounty adaptation and maybe still A Passage to India, but that's still only two movies in 35 years - even Lean is more prolific than that. (Ryan's Daughter might still happen ITTL, maybe he makes more of a success out of it.) Still nice to see Nostromo made, and between that and Heart of Darkness, Conrad is very well done by ITTL.
1995: So ITTL Paul Verhoeven managed to make Crusade (which was planned, IOTL, to star Arnold Schwarzenegger, with whom he'd worked on Total Recall). I can't imagine it would be anything less than horrifically violent. I guess making Showgirls an acclaimed, hard-hitting expose that wins acclaim and awards is beyond even your powers :p
1997: I suppose in this timeline the actual German aristocracy will have none of this commoner attempting to imply that he is nobility ;)
1999: Another of the Greatest Films Never Made! Letting Coppola make Megalopolis is definitely too kind to him, it's hard to imagine a man with his titanic ego not capsizing before he can get to this point, but on the other hand it's very hard to resist, I grant you...
2008: So who plays Ignatius J. Reilly? Will Ferrell? And another question - simply because it must be asked - are you going to have Gottlieb publish Toole's book ITTL, thus (presumably) butterflying Toole's suicide? Or, given his other mental issues, would that even be enough?
2015: Quebec's film industry mounting Cleopatra all by its lonesome would surely be a logistical challenge unless it's scaled way down from the 1963 "classic", assuming it still exists ITTL. Yes, we have CGI, but still. Also, the film would almost certainly have to be in French to get public funding, but fortunately Jolie has French-Canadian ancestry and appears to be at least moderately fluent in French (she taught it to her kids), so she's still in.
 
A thing I was thinking about for a long time, and that I want to share with you : what if I set up a Patreon to support myself and this timeline ? I'm a writer (working as a journalist and working on a non-alternate history novel in the same time), I consider this timeline to be a very serious business and I want to see it completed. It would support me in these hard times, give me the knack to see it completed (instead of the Perot TL that I let die after some time) and encourage me in updates.

The levels of suscribing would be : discovering the background beforehand ; honoring quickly your requests for particular updates on people, persons, events ; focusing on a country, cultural franchise, year of your choice ; collaborating into expanding the content I have already written for some countries (I think of you, Brainbin, on Canada) ; making a brand new timeline.
Please tell me if you would be interested.
 
As of returning with That Wacky Redhead author...

This one's a lot of fun, and you can't expect it to pass without me commenting on it:

1936 - Lang, presumably, is the earliest on this list of many directors who do not leave Germany for Hollywood.
1938 - Riefenstahl gets to make her masterpiece during the height of her career, undistracted by the OTL Nazi propaganda pictures that made her famous instead.
1956-59: Douglas Sirk makes his melodramas in Germany, does he? I'm curious about how to make Imitation of Life work as a German-made film - it's an adaptation of a previously-existing American film, and the plot is American to the core.
1960: Herr Wilder's film is the first on this list to, IOTL, win Best Picture at the Academy Awards. Like Imitation of Life, The Apartment just seems so "American" to me, but I suppose Germany would also have a burgeoning post-war white-collar middle class too, so it still works.

Yeah, Babelsberg turns out to be the European Mecca of cinema without the Nazis, and the Berlin Film Festival is much more mainstream than it turns out IOTL. Fritz Lang, Leni Riefenstahl, Douglas Sirk, Billy Wilder make their careers in Germany and later, Babelsberg recruits directors from Eastern Europe, such as Milos Forman.
Imitation of Life is one my favourite movies and here, the race question gests turned about Judaism, as of The Apartment, it owes to the post-World War rapidly expanding Berlin.

1941 - Instead of Citizen Kane, we get Welles' originally intended adaptation of the Conrad classic. It's a movie I'd love to see just to see if he could have pulled it off.

I wrote this update before I saw Mank and here, Welles gets the plug gotten out by Hearst and so cannot finish Citizen Kane. Heart of Darkness is as cult as it is IOTL, yet we never get to see Apocalypse Now.

1963: I will presume Grant is made in lieu of Ford's contributions to How the West Was Won. The timing of this - during the height of the OTL Civil Rights movement - is hard to ignore. IOTL Harry Morgan, mostly a television star (Bill Gannon on Dragnet and Colonel Potter on M*A*S*H) played Grant in How the West Was Won, but obviously John Wayne ought to play Grant in a proper biopic directed by John Ford.

Yeah, the old man Ford completes his career with this biopic of General Grant. I didn't thought of John Wayne, but it could do the trick.

1969: Kubrick's Napoleon is obviously an ATL picture close to my own heart. Looks like the timing is such that it would beat Bondarchuk's Waterloo to the screen ITTL, although assuming he also made 2001 it's hard to imagine Kubrick turning the picture around in that short a time-frame.

We have to pass 2001 who gets made by another director and later, but at least we get to see Napoleon on screen. David Hemmings plays Nappy.


1972: The Day the Clown Cried? You went there, you madman, you went there. Classic MaskedPickle!

Oh, yeah I did. But it's not about the Shoah (as it never happened here, but about something else.[/QUOTE]

1975: ITTL Forman adapts The Jungle Book instead of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and does so in his native Bohemia. I do hope for the sake of good taste he finds a young actor from the Indian subcontinent to play the lead.

It's the 1970s, so what do you expect ? It's a young Czech actor in brownface who portrays Mowgli.

1979: The film Scott would have directed had he not been inspired by Star Wars. Is it wrong that I like to imagine a TL where Scott went the James Ivory route?

Ridley Scott is a massive figure in Babelsberg ITTL, he still makes great blockbusters, but with a more auteur flavour.

1980: Truffaut directing The Elephant Man instead of Lynch. Speaking of, very surprised to not see an adaptation of Dune on here, whether by Lynch or Jodorowsky or anyone else.

The French New Wave had lesser repercussions ITTL due to the diminished status of France, so Mel Brooks throws his producer appeal behind Truffaut instead of encouracing Lynch.
Jorodowsky's Dune gets made in France, but... Picturing a seven-hour esoteric and highly symbolical science-fiction movie with even more craziness than El Topo and The Holy Mountain results in a massive flop in the box office. But, like, a devastating bomb. It's a cult movie still, but the science-fiction craze never gets here, as Star Wars had... a very different incarnation ITTL.

1981: Interesting that ITTL the title is translated into English when IOTL everyone calls it Das Boot.

It's the English-language Omnipedia, so I just relay the title translations...

1983: Given that we're still in the De Niro era, does he play Bill the Butcher? (Who died at 33 - De Niro was 40, more than old enough. Day-Lewis was in his early forties.) And which young pretty boy du jour plays Amsterdam?

Of course De Niro will be playing Bill the Butcher, and Harvey Keitel will stand in for Liam Neeson. IOTL, Scorcese thought about The Clash's Joe Strummer to play Amsterdam, I think it could do the trick.

1984: Amadeus is the second film on this list to have won Best Picture at the Oscars IOTL. A film made in Germany, it presumably would have been adapted from the German translation of the play (which IOTL premiered in 1981 in Berlin), with minimal involvement from Shaffer (who IOTL made many changes for the film). I can see one controversy emerging in how Mozart's accent will be depicted - Austrian being considered a "hick" or "hayseed" accent in Germany (proper) - which is why Arnold Schwarzenegger is dubbed in German despite being a native speaker. Forman still gets to direct, which pleases me.

I didn't think of that, I think it would be even better to reinforce the impression of Mozart as an arrogant and obscene man-child, complete with a peasent-accented German.

1987: Not surprised by this one at all. You are of course depriving the lead, Bruno Ganz, of his greatest performance IOTL so it's nice to see his second-greatest performance receive high acclaim. Does Peter Falk still play the American celebrity? :p

Wings of Desire remains one of the most beautiful movies ever made, if I'm not much of a Wanders fan. I can't think of someone else than Peter Falk... Maybe Paul Newman ?

1988: I suspect you're being too kind to Michael Cimino, though I note that his film was an international co-production...

I do love a lot Cimino, I consider the Deer Hunter as one of the greatest war movies ever made, and I have a soft spot for Heaven's Gate and Year of the Dragon. Yet, he still makes his movie about the Tour de France (Yeah, I'm a chauvinist, so what ?) but he tanks his career due his adaptation of... The Fountainhead.

1991: This is the part where we realize that in this world we lose all three of Lean's masterpieces - no Kwai, no Lawrence, no Zhivago :( What exactly did Lean do between 1955 and 1991 ITTL anyway? I mean, yes, probably a Mutiny on the Bounty adaptation and maybe still A Passage to India, but that's still only two movies in 35 years - even Lean is more prolific than that. (Ryan's Daughter might still happen ITTL, maybe he makes more of a success out of it.) Still nice to see Nostromo made, and between that and Heart of Darkness, Conrad is very well done by ITTL.

But David Lean did cult movies, he is well renowned, he even committed a biopic of Gandhi (starring Alec Guinness... Yeah, I know), but we never got to see Lawrence of Arabia. As of Doctor Zhivago, the novel is completely different. He did made Mutiny on the Country, Ryan's Daughter, A Passage to India and even Empire of the Sun. But he was, in Berlin at least, an "also-ran", who was seen everytime as a shoe-in, but lost to other competitors. Nostromo is a masterpiece, but it's more given to him as a manner to acknowledge his work as director before he passes away...

1995: So ITTL Paul Verhoeven managed to make Crusade (which was planned, IOTL, to star Arnold Schwarzenegger, with whom he'd worked on Total Recall). I can't imagine it would be anything less than horrifically violent. I guess making Showgirls an acclaimed, hard-hitting expose that wins acclaim and awards is beyond even your powers :p

Yeah, Verhoeven enjoys more personal freedom in Babelsberg than he ever did in Hollywood (Hell, I do like what he has done with "Elle" in France and I just can't wait to see Benedetta), so the movie is unbareably violent, but it's some sort of a more refined Flesh and Blood. Or Starship Troopers in the Middle Ages. And no, no one can help Showgirls.

1997: I suppose in this timeline the actual German aristocracy will have none of this commoner attempting to imply that he is nobility ;)

Lars is always some sort of troll ITTL, so he doesn't puts a "von" in his name in order to bother the Junker-dominated field of producers in Babelsberg. Snobbism gets different.

1999: Another of the Greatest Films Never Made! Letting Coppola make Megalopolis is definitely too kind to him, it's hard to imagine a man with his titanic ego not capsizing before he can get to this point, but on the other hand it's very hard to resist, I grant you...

Coppola did well with American Zoetrope and has established himself as a mix of Truffaut/Chabrol for the New Hollywood, and he doesn't destroy his Hollywood image with the quagmire of Apocalypse Now ; alas, The Godfather gets made by someone else. Here, he has plenty to do to achieve his masterpiece.

2008: So who plays Ignatius J. Reilly? Will Ferrell? And another question - simply because it must be asked - are you going to have Gottlieb publish Toole's book ITTL, thus (presumably) butterflying Toole's suicide? Or, given his other mental issues, would that even be enough?

No, it's John Goodman who portrays Ignatius here, I imagine him perfectly. As of John Kennedy Toole, I can not even dare to imagine the greatness he could have achieved had he lived, so let's say he dies in the same circumstances as of OTL. Sometimes, you are a misunderstood genius in various timelines.

2015: Quebec's film industry mounting Cleopatra all by its lonesome would surely be a logistical challenge unless it's scaled way down from the 1963 "classic", assuming it still exists ITTL. Yes, we have CGI, but still. Also, the film would almost certainly have to be in French to get public funding, but fortunately Jolie has French-Canadian ancestry and appears to be at least moderately fluent in French (she taught it to her kids), so she's still in.

Let's tell it : Cleopatra is an international production, made in English, but the Berlin Film Festival gave the movie Quebec citzenship as to reflect their author ; they tend to be criticized for being too German- or American- centric as of now, so they made this arrangement. I imagine well Angelina Jolie as Cleopatra, yet I think she would be too "old" by cinema standards to portray the Queen. Also, beware of accusations of whitewashing...
 
Top