Dread Nought but the Fury of the Seas

The Cruiser/carrier sounds like an 'interesting' experiment, there was a bit of a designing fad in the 20's and 30's of mixing a cruiser and a carrier



For example was a design the US was actually looking at in the late 20's early 30s.



But I assume she's very much a testbed design and would be put under the list of "Things to never repeat." The RN's not got a 'light BB' out yet but HP machinery and other advances...forshadowing much? :D
I can see Pegasus evolving into one of those ... first remove X turret to add length to the flight deck, then Y to add a bit more and a larger hangar ... then some years later remove A and B, add catapults and you have a half-decent small carrier.

They're finding out what can be done when machinery weights are not so high...
 
Assuming that the Churchill chancellorship is butterflied away (Churchill was terrible at economics) and Britain doesn't go back onto the Gold Standard (maybe promises to someday soon but does not actually shoot itself in the foot with a credit crunch) the interwar British economy should be 8-10% better off than OTL.
Churchill might not be much loss, but the return to Gold would be quite difficult to get rid of entirely.
It was widely supported, and seen as a return to stability and normality. The drivers for this are likely to be even stronger in the story, as Britain isn't quite as financially battered as in reality.

The best that could be hoped for there, I think, is a return at a more realistic rate of exchange.
 
How about a Fast Minelayer / Seaplane tender . I was thinking of rather than a hybrid a hull that could be equipped for either and had sets of kit stationed strategically round Empire for conversion back and forth if needed .

You could have a hangar space but for minelayer bottom half could be mine space and a floor/ mezzanine could be inserted for workshop space
 
She's a hybrid of County and a bigger version of the real Hermes - complete with island, spotting tops, directors and the rest.
In the near term, she looks like a cruiser with aircraft scouting abilities - superficially ideal for foreign stations to replace a few old cruisers. She can scout or monitor activities over a wide area, launch small strikes with aircraft and finish off the job with the 8".
So... superimposed turrets at both ends, with a big hangar block in the middle, flight deck over the top of the hangar block offset to allow space for an island bridge? I'm still struggling to see how they fit 26 aircraft (even 1920s models) into such a small space, given that was roughly how many Eagle operated OTL and she was over 20,000 tons and a dedicated carrier. Presumably two hangar decks one above the other? It would make for rather a tall superstructure on a fairly slim hull. Avoid taking her into any Indian Ocean typhoons.

More generally, there's a difference between aircraft-as-scouts and aircraft-as-strike-force. As long as you're only loading lightweight 1920s scout planes, you can fit them into quite a small space and for independent cruiser operations (whether patrol, hunter, escort or raider) they're extremely useful because they give a huge increase in search radius at a relatively low cost. Likewise for the traditional cruiser-as-fleet-scout - yes, having to stop to launch/recover the seaplanes is a pain, but the bonus of having half-a-dozen eyes buzzing around at 10,000 feet and 100mph 20 or 50 miles ahead of your cruiser screen more than makes up for it. Hence I can see the attraction of a cruiser that can launch and recover aircraft in all reasonable weathers and doesn't have to stop to do it. Of course, once you move on from scout planes to high-performance fighters (with their high landing speeds) and heavy attack planes struggling to get off the deck with a load of 1000lb bombs or torpedoes, well, you're gonna need a bigger deck.

The other issue is that, although nobody knows it as yet, the cruiser role in the battle fleet is shifting from fleet scout to fleet escort (and destroyer leader/destroyer-killer more generally), and for those roles aircraft are much less useful. Of course, with all the BCs around TTL, a 1940s war may see many fewer cruiser/destroyer taskforces built around CAs as the heavy ships.
Here is one from the second battle of Guadalcanal, although it was South Dakota's own gunfire that set her planes on fire.
South Dakota seems to have been the Warspite of the US Navy - her career history is full of incident .
 
Churchill might not be much loss, but the return to Gold would be quite difficult to get rid of entirely.
It was widely supported, and seen as a return to stability and normality. The drivers for this are likely to be even stronger in the story, as Britain isn't quite as financially battered as in reality.

The best that could be hoped for there, I think, is a return at a more realistic rate of exchange.
The person who Baldwin actually wanted for Chancellor was apparently Reginald McKenna who was of the "Lord make me chaste but not yet" school of thinking on returning to gold but he preferred to stay loyal to the Liberals.
 
How about a Fast Minelayer / Seaplane tender . I was thinking of rather than a hybrid a hull that could be equipped for either and had sets of kit stationed strategically round Empire for conversion back and forth if needed .

You could have a hangar space but for minelayer bottom half could be mine space and a floor/ mezzanine could be inserted for workshop space
Interesting idea, but there'd likely be some issues with topweight, filling an empty hangar with mines and workshops.
 
it's a fair point . My mental image was of HMS Manxman class so with the mine deck integrated into the hull but with an extra deck house to give necessary height for conversion to a hangar. So some topweight but not as much as if the full hangar was above deck level.
 
South Dakota seems to have been the Warspite of the US Navy - her career history is full of incident .
That would be USS Enterprise.



*the things that go through your head at 3am. For a moment I imagined Warspite asking South Dakota to hold her beer. Then I remembered SD was both too young to have beer and would not be allowed to in the USN anyway.
 
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Coulsdon Eagle

Monthly Donor
That would be USS Enterprise.



*the things that go through your head at 3am. For a moment I imagined Warspite asking South Dakota to hold her beer. Then I remembered SD was both too young to have beer and would not be allowed to in the USN anyway.
Not sure a Queen would be let into the USN either, although the RN did have turns in the barrel each night or searches for the golden rivet(allegedly!)
 
So... superimposed turrets at both ends, with a big hangar block in the middle, flight deck over the top of the hangar block offset to allow space for an island bridge? I'm still struggling to see how they fit 26 aircraft (even 1920s models) into such a small space, given that was roughly how many Eagle operated OTL and she was over 20,000 tons and a dedicated carrier. Presumably two hangar decks one above the other? It would make for rather a tall superstructure on a fairly slim hull. Avoid taking her into any Indian Ocean typhoons.
...
Round figures - 380' deck, with a 320' hangar underneath it (allowing space for the lift and other intrusions).
A Blackburn Dart torpedo bomber could fit into the diagonal of about a 30' box, and that could be overlapped with the next one. Fitting 26 into the hangar isn't totally implausible; that's cramming them in, but it was 'up to 26', and there were smaller planes.
Worth noting Eagle wasn't a very spacious carrier due to the conversion. Pegasus is a keel-up design.
 
The Cruiser/carrier sounds like an 'interesting' experiment, there was a bit of a designing fad in the 20's and 30's of mixing a cruiser and a carrier



For example was a design the US was actually looking at in the late 20's early 30s.



But I assume she's very much a testbed design and would be put under the list of "Things to never repeat." The RN's not got a 'light BB' out yet but HP machinery and other advances...forshadowing much? :D
And of course if taken to a 'logical' extreme you get something like




Curious, the position of the bridge in the profile of the upper corner image gives the ship certain resemblance to the KGV class...

You know, is quite impressive the things and the imagination of the people back in those days to design or build things like that, or this:

 
Curious, the position of the bridge in the profile of the upper corner image gives the ship certain resemblance to the KGV class...

You know, is quite impressive the things and the imagination of the people back in those days to design or build things like that, or this:

I think it had more to do with the fact that you could buy cocaine and other narcotics over the counter then.
 
No no no, Enterprise wasn't a ship of incidents, she just has a known distinction of been the only ship capable of dealing with any given situation, she was just earning her pay. ;)

I dunno why Nimitz even sent Hornet and Yorktown to Midway, the Big E would've cleaned up all by herself and come home without a scratch, especially with Spruance commanding the TF :)
 
Have we mentioned in the small battleships department Thurston's design 892? That was a mini-Nelson with 2 triple 16in guns, 8x6in secondaries, 4x4.7in AA, Nelson's armor and 26 knots speed. Copy the USN by declaring it 23,000t plus 3,000 for air defence and you just need to cut 500t to fit treaty limits.

It should be also pretty attractive to the smaller navies either in its original form or an enlarged version...
 
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