Stenz

Monthly Donor
Helicopters have become pretty much de rigueur on modern destroyers and frigates, one can argue it’s an update on the floatplanes used on cruisers interwar.
 
Ok man, firts things firts, calm down, second, this:

I haven't seen any convincing arguments to suggest that removing aircraft from cruisers or capital ships is a good idea at all, in your scenario...

I considered and understand your point, so I offer possible alternatives to be considered, they are not perfect but it can work, allow me to convince you:
how do we search the south Atlantic with a squadron of 6 cruisers spread across the trade routes when you only have one tender equipped with seaplanes instead of 6 separate cruisers with their own scout aircraft? How is a dedicated seaplane tender more efficient in this scenario? How do you spot the fall of your shot when the closest seaplane tender is 500 miles away? How do you fly the Admiral to a meeting when the seaplane carrier is in dock getting torpedo damage repaired as it has to keep stopping to pick up aircraft in a war zone?

  1. You don´t, to that effect I proposed the following:
    Yes they were a valuable asset in peace and war, but allow me to convince you of an amendment to reduce the risk, namely: to limit the number according to the size(type) of vessel, a maximum of 2 planes and catapults on capital ships and 1 of each on cruisers and lesser vessels.
  2. In this way:
    a cruiser-tender specifically intended to fit in that role in wartime, assign to each division or squadron so that the other ships can be spare of that burden (this not applies to capital ships), if you're not agree, then the second option is just to continue to retain the pre-war complement on the basis stated above, but just onboard ships selected to act as flagships (again capital ships excluded), if is possible to apply both options then there are to be plenty of options at hand for an admiral.
  3. By designing it to keep pace with the rest.
  4. Ok, you catch me with that last, but I think that it can be work out, somehow.

For fleet work a seaplane tender is also a liability in comparison to an actual CV, the seaplane tender will have to be as fast as a carrier to allow operations to pick up the float planes, to operate enough aircraft it will be of cruiser size and it will only have a tenth of the capability of an actual CV which probably would not cost much more to build and operate than the fast seaplane tender or aviation cruiser.

Am not so sure on that particular, while I acknowledge that it could be a bit cumbersome to stop picking the planes, now that am realising, I think that it doesn't have to be seaplanes, but normal planes that after fulfilling their mission they land on the carriers with the fleet and get over to the tender in port. As for cost, well it depends I guess, influencing would be probably the number of planes carried and machinery.

There is a reason that only the IJN built the kind of aviation cruiser is they had a very narrow veiw of how they would fight a battle, the RN and USN have a greater need for flexibility for their ships which is why they spent a lot of time working how to use them efficiently.

Agree on the japanese.
And british and americans can still do it, just with a slightly different frame.

Removal of floatplanes will happen once radar becomes commonplace and the threat of air attack becomes so much that the top weight is needed for air defence weapons, till then they are as vital to a cruiser as the torpedoes are.

Also agree on that, just disagree in the ´vital´ part of the sentence, but everything else are ok, it will happen in due time.

all in all, my perspective is just to reduce risks with the planes to its minimum.
 
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Helicopters have become pretty much de rigueur on modern destroyers and frigates, one can argue it’s an update on the floatplanes used on cruisers interwar.
But they are just one from ship to ship, and are more than just a simple searching tool.
 
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I think it's important to note that there's two main types of cruisers, and a third who tries to straddle both roles.

Both have different requirements and organic search planes have a different value for both.

1. Fleet cruisers.
Crusers whose main purpose is to operate with the fleet. If there's an appropriate doctrine you can assume there will always be an associated carrier (either fleet or light or escort or conversion). Therefore it does not have to operate it's own planes.

2 Trade protection.
Cruisers whose main purpose is to defend the Trade routes. These generally operate on their own. They will never have a carrier support. They must have an organic search functionality.

3. Dual function
These ships must be capable of performing either fleet or trade protection roles and therefore must carry their own planes for search purposes.
 
R&R weren't 30-32 knt ships?

A good ORBAt there however, and yes is clearly more reasonable to group similar ships in a single squadron or division, if you ask me, in that line of thought, I proposed this: 1st squadron, Furious and Rodney; 2nd squadron, Hood and How's and 3rd squadron, R&R. A second consideration I had take is the gun calibre and size of the ships, apart of their obvious similarities, so in wartime, as autonomous divisions, they are to give support (I guess) to the heavy cruiser squadrons and flanking fire in support of the battleships, which means that, whilr autonomous, they are to respond and come more directly under the control of the admiral as detached divisions in advance of the battleships, this is just a little tricky because it implies that the commanders of those divisions are expected to work in consonance, but it won't work if they bad blood between them.
R&R were 31-kt ships when built, but they've been bulged and re-armoured since then, increasing beam by ~10' and displacement by ~5,000 tons.
They're 29.5-knot ships (at best) by 1924.

Splitting them up into three units is likely in the future, as forces need to be spread out (up until '23-24, the RN has kept a 'Lion' in the Med, but they're now being scrapped).

On the other hand, there is the possibility of the mix squadrons, i.e. attaching 3-4 heavy cruisers directly to said battlecruisers to round up their numbers as a unit and maximize their fire power, apart of the psychological impact of seeing in the horizon as a full division of oncoming capital ships closing fast on you.
...
Depends on the circumstances; in a fleet action, putting armoured cruisers with battleships/battlecruisers isn't a good idea.
However on remote stations, reinforcing a cruiser squadron with a battlecruiser can be a useful force multiplier, if it's done well.
 
Helicopters have become pretty much de rigueur on modern destroyers and frigates, one can argue it’s an update on the floatplanes used on cruisers interwar.
If only they'd had practical helicopters in the '20s.
Put a pad on a turret and you're done. Still, there are other options, but we're a long way off that yet...
 

Stenz

Monthly Donor
That each ship have just one helicopter, and that their function goes beyond an advance pathfinder.

And? Cruisers only carried one floatplane usually. The function going further (I assume you mean ASW, etc) is merely logical advancement as weaponry makes it practical. There’s nothing quantum leap like in the advancement of shipborne aircraft, it’s all been steady and predictable as the technology advanced with time.

I don’t understand your assertion that not having the ability to deploy an aircraft is somehow an advantage. I can understand the facilities can be viewed as weight and space penalties, but a vessel with the ability to carry, launch and recover an aircraft is always better suited to scouting and trade protection than one without.
 
design of Treaty cruiser submitted by the DNC in 1923 to the Admiralty and approve by Parliament for the 1924 fiscal year:

County class, Britain heavy cruiser laid down 1924

Displacement:
10.501 t light; 10.886 t standard; 11.616 t normal; 12.199 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(675,11 ft / 668,00 ft) x 68,00 ft x (17,90 / 18,58 ft)
(205,77 m / 203,61 m) x 20,73 m x (5,46 / 5,66 m)

Armament:
8 - 8,00" / 203 mm 50,0 cal guns - 271,01lbs / 122,93kg shells, 100 per gun
Breech loading guns in turret on barbette mounts, 1924 Model
4 x 2-gun mounts on centreline ends, evenly spread
2 raised mounts - superfiring
8 - 4,50" / 114 mm 45,0 cal guns - 45,95lbs / 20,84kg shells, 150 per gun
Breech loading guns in deck mounts, 1924 Model
8 x Single mounts on sides amidships
Weight of broadside 2.536 lbs / 1.150 kg
4 - 21,0" / 533 mm, 1,50 ft / 0,46 m torpedoes - 0,225 t each, 0,899 t total
In 4 sets of deck mounted carriage/fixed tubes
4 - 21,0" / 533 mm, 1,50 ft / 0,46 m torpedoes - 0,225 t each, 0,899 t total
In 4 sets of deck mounted carriage/fixed tubes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 1,00" / 25 mm 360,72 ft / 109,95 m 9,90 ft / 3,02 m
Ends: 1,00" / 25 mm 307,26 ft / 93,65 m 9,90 ft / 3,02 m
Upper: 1,00" / 25 mm 360,72 ft / 109,95 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 83 % of normal length

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 1,00" / 25 mm 1,00" / 25 mm 1,00" / 25 mm
2nd: 1,00" / 25 mm - -

- Box over machinery & magazines: 4,00" / 102 mm
Forecastle: 1,50" / 38 mm Quarter deck: 1,50" / 38 mm

- Conning towers: Forward 1,00" / 25 mm, Aft 0,00" / 0 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 69.107 shp / 51.554 Kw = 30,00 kts
Range 10.800nm at 10,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1.314 tons

Complement:
559 - 727

Cost:
£2,874 million / $11,495 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 734 tons, 6,3 %
- Guns: 732 tons, 6,3 %
- Torpedoes: 2 tons, 0,0 %
Armour: 2.557 tons, 22,0 %
- Belts: 386 tons, 3,3 %
- Armament: 159 tons, 1,4 %
- Armour Deck: 2.002 tons, 17,2 %
- Conning Tower: 11 tons, 0,1 %
Machinery: 2.276 tons, 19,6 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 4.933 tons, 42,5 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 1.115 tons, 9,6 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
20.031 lbs / 9.086 Kg = 78,2 x 8,0 " / 203 mm shells or 2,3 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,08
Metacentric height 3,2 ft / 1,0 m
Roll period: 15,9 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 100 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,91
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 2,00

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0,500 / 0,506
Length to Beam Ratio: 9,82 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 25,85 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 49 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 10,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 2,00 ft / 0,61 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20,00 %, 29,00 ft / 8,84 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Forward deck: 30,00 %, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Aft deck: 30,00 %, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Quarter deck: 20,00 %, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Average freeboard: 27,16 ft / 8,28 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 83,0 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 278,2 %
Waterplane Area: 30.265 Square feet or 2.812 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 123 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 103 lbs/sq ft or 503 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,84
- Longitudinal: 2,03
- Overall: 0,92
Caution: Hull subject to strain in open-sea
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather



Proposed modifications to the cruisers of the treaty type A to make them battle ready, submitted to the Admiralty by the DNC and approve by Parliament to be carried out during the fiscal years 1934,35,36,37,38:

County class refitted, Britain heavy cruiser laid down 1924 (Engine 1934)

Displacement:
11.223 t light; 11.610 t standard; 12.299 t normal; 12.850 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(676,11 ft / 668,00 ft) x 68,00 ft (Bulges 72,00 ft) x (17,90 / 18,54 ft)
(206,08 m / 203,61 m) x 20,73 m (Bulges 21,95 m) x (5,46 / 5,65 m)

Armament:
8 - 8,00" / 203 mm 50,0 cal guns - 271,01lbs / 122,93kg shells, 90 per gun
Breech loading guns in turret on barbette mounts, 1924 Model
4 x 2-gun mounts on centreline ends, evenly spread
2 raised mounts - superfiring
8 - 4,50" / 114 mm 45,0 cal guns - 45,95lbs / 20,84kg shells, 150 per gun
Breech loading guns in deck mounts, 1924 Model
8 x Single mounts on sides amidships
Weight of broadside 2.536 lbs / 1.150 kg
4 - 21,0" / 533 mm, 1,50 ft / 0,46 m torpedoes - 0,225 t each, 0,899 t total
In 4 sets of deck mounted carriage/fixed tubes
4 - 21,0" / 533 mm, 1,50 ft / 0,46 m torpedoes - 0,225 t each, 0,899 t total
In 4 sets of deck mounted carriage/fixed tubes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 5,00" / 127 mm 360,00 ft / 109,73 m 10,00 ft / 3,05 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 4,00" / 102 mm 360,00 ft / 109,73 m 7,00 ft / 2,13 m
Main Belt covers 83 % of normal length

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 5,00" / 127 mm 1,00" / 25 mm 4,00" / 102 mm
2nd: 1,00" / 25 mm - -

- Armoured deck - single deck: 1,50" / 38 mm For and Aft decks
Forecastle: 1,50" / 38 mm Quarter deck: 1,50" / 38 mm

- Conning towers: Forward 1,00" / 25 mm, Aft 0,00" / 0 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 76.518 shp / 57.082 Kw = 30,45 kts
Range 10.800nm at 10,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1.240 tons

Complement:
583 - 759

Cost:
£2,920 million / $11,678 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 734 tons, 6,0 %
- Guns: 732 tons, 6,0 %
- Torpedoes: 2 tons, 0,0 %
Armour: 2.505 tons, 20,4 %
- Belts: 1.188 tons, 9,7 %
- Armament: 460 tons, 3,7 %
- Armour Deck: 846 tons, 6,9 %
- Conning Tower: 11 tons, 0,1 %
Machinery: 2.201 tons, 17,9 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 5.783 tons, 47,0 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 1.076 tons, 8,7 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
24.020 lbs / 10.895 Kg = 93,8 x 8,0 " / 203 mm shells or 2,7 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,06
Metacentric height 3,2 ft / 1,0 m
Roll period: 17,0 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 93 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,73
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,87

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0,500 / 0,504
Length to Beam Ratio: 9,28 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 25,85 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 50 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 10,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 3,00 ft / 0,91 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20,00 %, 29,00 ft / 8,84 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Forward deck: 30,00 %, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Aft deck: 30,00 %, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Quarter deck: 20,00 %, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Average freeboard: 27,16 ft / 8,28 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 76,5 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 266,8 %
Waterplane Area: 30.265 Square feet or 2.812 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 133 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 118 lbs/sq ft or 576 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,92
- Longitudinal: 2,21
- Overall: 1,01
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather

Note: modifications on length, beam by added bulges and modern machinery, all of which has reduce weights and restore composite strengh to a balance, which at same time has allow a increase in speed.


PD: I admit that I cheat a little on the modifications, but just a little bit.
 
Proposed designs for the Fisher Class battleships:
First proposed design in the case of the ratification of the articles of the pending London naval treaty.

Fisher class, Britain battleship laid down 1936

Displacement:
34.689 t light; 36.466 t standard; 37.286 t normal; 37.942 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(718,16 ft / 710,00 ft) x 106,00 ft x (28,90 / 29,32 ft)
(218,90 m / 216,41 m) x 32,31 m x (8,81 / 8,94 m)

Armament:
10 - 15,00" / 381 mm 45,0 cal guns - 1.701,89lbs / 771,96kg shells, 100 per gun
Breech loading guns in turret on barbette mounts, 1936 Model
2 x Twin mounts on centreline ends, evenly spread
2 raised mounts - superfiring
2 x Triple mounts on centreline ends, evenly spread
16 - 5,00" / 127 mm 45,0 cal guns - 63,03lbs / 28,59kg shells, 150 per gun
Breech loading guns in turret on barbette mounts, 1936 Model
8 x Twin mounts on sides, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 18.027 lbs / 8.177 kg
4 - 21,0" / 533 mm, 3,00 ft / 0,91 m torpedoes - 0,361 t each, 1,446 t total
In 2 sets of deck mounted carriage/fixed tubes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 14,0" / 356 mm 434,40 ft / 132,41 m 12,35 ft / 3,76 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 12,0" / 305 mm 434,40 ft / 132,41 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 94 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead:
1,30" / 33 mm 434,40 ft / 132,41 m 27,25 ft / 8,31 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 13,0" / 330 mm 5,00" / 127 mm 13,0" / 330 mm
2nd: 4,00" / 102 mm 4,00" / 102 mm 4,00" / 102 mm

- Armoured deck - single deck: 5,00" / 127 mm For and Aft decks
Forecastle: 5,00" / 127 mm Quarter deck: 5,00" / 127 mm

- Conning towers: Forward 13,00" / 330 mm, Aft 0,00" / 0 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 53.784 shp / 40.123 Kw = 23,00 kts
Range 6.000nm at 10,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1.476 tons

Complement:
1.341 - 1.744

Cost:
£16,388 million / $65,552 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 3.059 tons, 8,2 %
- Guns: 3.058 tons, 8,2 %
- Torpedoes: 1 tons, 0,0 %
Armour: 15.159 tons, 40,7 %
- Belts: 5.140 tons, 13,8 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 569 tons, 1,5 %
- Armament: 4.005 tons, 10,7 %
- Armour Deck: 5.132 tons, 13,8 %
- Conning Tower: 313 tons, 0,8 %
Machinery: 1.509 tons, 4,0 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 14.962 tons, 40,1 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.597 tons, 7,0 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
75.731 lbs / 34.351 Kg = 44,9 x 15,0 " / 381 mm shells or 12,4 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,12
Metacentric height 6,7 ft / 2,1 m
Roll period: 17,1 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 77 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,91
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,72

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0,600 / 0,602
Length to Beam Ratio: 6,70 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 26,65 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 42 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 45
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 12,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 2,00 ft / 0,61 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20,00 %, 29,00 ft / 8,84 m, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m
- Forward deck: 50,00 %, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m
- Aft deck: 13,00 %, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m
- Quarter deck: 17,00 %, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m
- Average freeboard: 26,24 ft / 8,00 m
Ship tends to be wet forward

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 67,2 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 203,2 %
Waterplane Area: 55.044 Square feet or 5.114 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 109 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 208 lbs/sq ft or 1.016 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,94
- Longitudinal: 1,73
- Overall: 1,00
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather



Second proposed design as permitted by the escalation clause in the case the articles of the pending London naval treaty are not ratified by unanimity.

Fisher class, Britain battleship laid down 1936

Displacement:
37.078 t light; 38.909 t standard; 40.000 t normal; 40.873 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(753,16 ft / 745,00 ft) x 108,00 ft x (29,00 / 29,52 ft)
(229,56 m / 227,08 m) x 32,92 m x (8,84 / 9,00 m)

Armament:
10 - 15,00" / 381 mm 45,0 cal guns - 1.701,89lbs / 771,96kg shells, 100 per gun
Breech loading guns in turret on barbette mounts, 1936 Model
1 x Twin mount on centreline forward
1 raised mount - superfiring
2 x 4-gun mounts on centreline ends, evenly spread
16 - 5,00" / 127 mm 45,0 cal guns - 63,03lbs / 28,59kg shells, 150 per gun
Breech loading guns in turret on barbette mounts, 1936 Model
8 x Twin mounts on sides, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 18.027 lbs / 8.177 kg
4 - 21,0" / 533 mm, 3,00 ft / 0,91 m torpedoes - 0,361 t each, 1,446 t total
In 2 sets of deck mounted carriage/fixed tubes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 14,0" / 356 mm 434,40 ft / 132,41 m 12,35 ft / 3,76 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 12,0" / 305 mm 434,40 ft / 132,41 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 90 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead:
1,30" / 33 mm 434,40 ft / 132,41 m 27,25 ft / 8,31 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 13,0" / 330 mm 5,00" / 127 mm 13,0" / 330 mm
2nd: 4,00" / 102 mm 4,00" / 102 mm 4,00" / 102 mm

- Armoured deck - single deck: 5,00" / 127 mm For and Aft decks
Forecastle: 5,00" / 127 mm Quarter deck: 5,00" / 127 mm

- Conning towers: Forward 13,00" / 330 mm, Aft 0,00" / 0 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 111.205 shp / 82.959 Kw = 27,60 kts
Range 8.000nm at 10,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1.963 tons

Complement:
1.413 - 1.838

Cost:
£18,018 million / $72,073 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 3.477 tons, 8,7 %
- Guns: 3.475 tons, 8,7 %
- Torpedoes: 1 tons, 0,0 %
Armour: 15.008 tons, 37,5 %
- Belts: 5.171 tons, 12,9 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 569 tons, 1,4 %
- Armament: 3.453 tons, 8,6 %
- Armour Deck: 5.487 tons, 13,7 %
- Conning Tower: 328 tons, 0,8 %
Machinery: 3.120 tons, 7,8 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 15.473 tons, 38,7 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.922 tons, 7,3 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
70.231 lbs / 31.856 Kg = 41,6 x 15,0 " / 381 mm shells or 10,3 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,15
Metacentric height 7,3 ft / 2,2 m
Roll period: 16,8 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 69 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,72
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,38

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0,600 / 0,602
Length to Beam Ratio: 6,90 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 27,29 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 50 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 12,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 2,00 ft / 0,61 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20,00 %, 29,00 ft / 8,84 m, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m
- Forward deck: 50,00 %, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m
- Aft deck: 13,00 %, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m
- Quarter deck: 17,00 %, 26,00 ft / 7,92 m, 27,00 ft / 8,23 m
- Average freeboard: 26,33 ft / 8,02 m
Ship tends to be wet forward

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 78,4 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 206,2 %
Waterplane Area: 58.847 Square feet or 5.467 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 107 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 207 lbs/sq ft or 1.012 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,95
- Longitudinal: 1,60
- Overall: 1,00
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily
 
design of Treaty cruiser submitted by the DNC in 1923 to the Admiralty and approve by Parliament for the 1924 fiscal year:

County class, Britain heavy cruiser laid down 1924

Displacement:
10.501 t light; 10.886 t standard; 11.616 t normal; 12.199 t full load
...
Interesting to see what Springsharp does.
IMO that ship is a bit big for its displacement, and on the slow side. In the early '20s they wouldn't have the 4.5" gun, and the fuel capacity is very small.

For reference, these are the legend figures of the real London (as completed).

Hull
5190​
Machinery
1730​
Armament
1245​
Equipment
640​
Armour
940​

Additions for Deep Load
Fuel
3222​
Reserve Feed Water
165​
Equipment
100​
Armament
111​
 
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Interesting to see what Springsharp does.
IMO that ship is a bit big for its displacement, and on the slow side. In the early '20s they wouldn't have the 4.5" gun, and the fuel capacity is very small.

For reference, these are the legend figures of the real London (as completed).

Hull
5190​
Machinery
1730​
Armament
1245​
Equipment
640​
Armour
940​

Additions for Deep Load
Fuel
3222​
Reserve Feed Water
165​
Equipment
100​
Armament
111​

Well, I could have and wanted push up to the 31,5 knot of the Kents, but then a thought that is already compromise design, probably thats the reason why of the low figure on fuel, but can push the limit a not more. To be honest, I didn't noticed that aspect, I thought it would configure itself according to autonomy.
 
Interesting to see what Springsharp does.
IMO that ship is a bit big for its displacement, and on the slow side. In the early '20s they wouldn't have the 4.5" gun, and the fuel capacity is very small.

The reason why so many of the springsharp ships turn out so heavy is that people are now avoiding the "poor seaboat"/"risks damage in heavy seas" warnings, and try to have good crew accommodation spaces. There are many level of such warnings in springsharp, and the first ones all trigger quite early. IRL most of the treaty cruisers were designed to be rather tight, resulting in ships that had many flaws.
 
The only thing that's curious about those RN CA's is that they've got 8 x torpedo tubes, thats a big torpedo armament for an RN cruiser of the era. But otherwise, lovely! I assume the Fisher's are re-using older ships guns or are they built around a new Mk2 15-inch gun?
 
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