Dread Nought but the Fury of the Seas

How did you figure that out or is it a guesstimate based on WWI shells or comparable guns from other navies?
the program allows you to play with shell weight, but I try my best to maintain certain consistency and equilibrium, cause a bigger shell means more space require and so on, which directly affect the internal subdivision and the amount of armor required to cover the magazines and machinery spaces as well as the composite strength, which is my ground base concern for a good design.

Is this ship just an improved Deutschland with some better armour and not constrained by the OTL 10,000 tons limit?
Yep.

Here are some modified variants, I notice late that the armor was not covering the vitals properly:

Klein version 1:
important points modified are shell weight, armored ends and armor length.

ADMIRAL CLASS , GERMANY PANZERSCHIFFE KLEIN laid down 1930

Displacement:
18.434 t light; 19.367 t standard; 20.622 t normal; 21.627 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
657,22 ft / 656,17 ft x 80,00 ft x 25,00 ft (normal load)
200,32 m / 200,00 m x 24,38 m x 7,62 m

Armament:
6 - 11,00" / 279 mm guns (2x3 guns), 800,50lbs / 363,10kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, evenly spread
12 - 5,90" / 150 mm guns in single mounts, 102,69lbs / 46,58kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts
on side, all amidships
Weight of broadside 6.035 lbs / 2.738 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 150
6 - 20,0" / 508 mm above water torpedoes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 426,51 ft / 130,00 m 10,73 ft / 3,27 m
Ends: 1,00" / 25 mm 229,64 ft / 69,99 m 10,73 ft / 3,27 m
Upper: 7,00" / 178 mm 426,51 ft / 130,00 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 100 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead:
1,00" / 25 mm 426,51 ft / 130,00 m 22,95 ft / 7,00 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 3,00" / 76 mm 9,00" / 229 mm
2nd: 1,00" / 25 mm 1,00" / 25 mm -

- Armour deck: 2,00" / 51 mm, Conning tower: 9,00" / 229 mm

Machinery:
Diesel Internal combustion motors,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 102.726 shp / 76.633 Kw = 30,00 kts
Range 10.000nm at 12,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 2.259 tons

Complement:
859 - 1.118

Cost:
£6,815 million / $27,260 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 653 tons, 3,2 %
Armour: 5.617 tons, 27,2 %
- Belts: 2.857 tons, 13,9 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 362 tons, 1,8 %
- Armament: 897 tons, 4,3 %
- Armour Deck: 1.355 tons, 6,6 %
- Conning Tower: 146 tons, 0,7 %
Machinery: 3.113 tons, 15,1 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 9.051 tons, 43,9 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.188 tons, 10,6 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
33.671 lbs / 15.273 Kg = 50,6 x 11,0 " / 279 mm shells or 4,6 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,15
Metacentric height 4,7 ft / 1,4 m
Roll period: 15,6 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 66 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,61
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,31

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0,550
Length to Beam Ratio: 8,20 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 25,62 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 55 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 2,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0,00 ft / 0,00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 30,00 ft / 9,14 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Mid (50 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Stern: 20,00 ft / 6,10 m
- Average freeboard: 25,03 ft / 7,63 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 99,4 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 188,6 %
Waterplane Area: 36.635 Square feet or 3.403 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 121 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 161 lbs/sq ft or 784 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 1,05
- Longitudinal: 1,90
- Overall: 1,12
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is adequate
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily





Klein version 2:
important points modified are shell weight, speed, unarmoured ends and armor length.

ADMIRAL CLASS , GERMANY PANZERSCHIFFE KLEIN laid down 1930

Displacement:
18.434 t light; 19.367 t standard; 20.622 t normal; 21.627 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
657,22 ft / 656,17 ft x 80,00 ft x 25,00 ft (normal load)
200,32 m / 200,00 m x 24,38 m x 7,62 m

Armament:
6 - 11,00" / 279 mm guns (2x3 guns), 800,50lbs / 363,10kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, evenly spread
12 - 5,90" / 150 mm guns in single mounts, 102,69lbs / 46,58kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts
on side, all amidships
Weight of broadside 6.035 lbs / 2.738 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 150
6 - 20,0" / 508 mm above water torpedoes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 463,00 ft / 141,12 m 10,73 ft / 3,27 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 7,00" / 178 mm 463,00 ft / 141,12 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 109 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead:
1,00" / 25 mm 463,00 ft / 141,12 m 22,95 ft / 7,00 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 3,00" / 76 mm 9,00" / 229 mm
2nd: 1,00" / 25 mm 1,00" / 25 mm -

- Armour deck: 2,00" / 51 mm, Conning tower: 9,00" / 229 mm

Machinery:
Diesel Internal combustion motors,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 117.250 shp / 87.468 Kw = 31,00 kts
Range 10.000nm at 12,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 2.259 tons

Complement:
859 - 1.118

Cost:
£7,073 million / $28,291 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 653 tons, 3,2 %
Armour: 5.749 tons, 27,9 %
- Belts: 2.958 tons, 14,3 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 393 tons, 1,9 %
- Armament: 897 tons, 4,3 %
- Armour Deck: 1.355 tons, 6,6 %
- Conning Tower: 146 tons, 0,7 %
Machinery: 3.553 tons, 17,2 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 8.479 tons, 41,1 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.188 tons, 10,6 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
31.069 lbs / 14.093 Kg = 46,7 x 11,0 " / 279 mm shells or 4,1 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,17
Metacentric height 4,8 ft / 1,5 m
Roll period: 15,4 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 62 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,59
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,23

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0,550
Length to Beam Ratio: 8,20 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 25,62 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 56 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 2,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0,00 ft / 0,00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 30,00 ft / 9,14 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Mid (50 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Stern: 20,00 ft / 6,10 m
- Average freeboard: 25,03 ft / 7,63 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 108,5 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 188,6 %
Waterplane Area: 36.635 Square feet or 3.403 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 114 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 150 lbs/sq ft or 735 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,98
- Longitudinal: 1,78
- Overall: 1,04
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is adequate
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily



Grosse version 1:
important points modified are shell weight, speed, unarmoured ends and armor length.

ADMIRAL CLASS , GERMANY PANZERSCHIFFE KLEIN laid down 1930

Displacement:
18.385 t light; 19.367 t standard; 20.622 t normal; 21.627 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
657,22 ft / 656,17 ft x 80,00 ft x 25,00 ft (normal load)
200,32 m / 200,00 m x 24,38 m x 7,62 m

Armament:
6 - 12,00" / 305 mm guns (2x3 guns), 900,00lbs / 408,23kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, evenly spread
12 - 5,90" / 150 mm guns in single mounts, 102,69lbs / 46,58kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts
on side, all amidships
Weight of broadside 6.632 lbs / 3.008 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 150
6 - 20,0" / 508 mm above water torpedoes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 454,00 ft / 138,38 m 10,73 ft / 3,27 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 7,00" / 178 mm 454,00 ft / 138,38 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 106 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead:
1,00" / 25 mm 454,00 ft / 138,38 m 22,95 ft / 7,00 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 3,00" / 76 mm 9,00" / 229 mm
2nd: 1,00" / 25 mm 1,00" / 25 mm -

- Armour deck: 2,00" / 51 mm, Conning tower: 9,00" / 229 mm

Machinery:
Diesel Internal combustion motors,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 102.726 shp / 76.633 Kw = 30,00 kts
Range 10.000nm at 12,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 2.259 tons

Complement:
859 - 1.118

Cost:
£7,331 million / $29,323 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 802 tons, 3,9 %
Armour: 5.787 tons, 28,1 %
- Belts: 2.911 tons, 14,1 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 386 tons, 1,9 %
- Armament: 989 tons, 4,8 %
- Armour Deck: 1.355 tons, 6,6 %
- Conning Tower: 146 tons, 0,7 %
Machinery: 3.113 tons, 15,1 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 8.683 tons, 42,1 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.238 tons, 10,9 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
31.325 lbs / 14.209 Kg = 36,3 x 12,0 " / 305 mm shells or 4,2 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,14
Metacentric height 4,6 ft / 1,4 m
Roll period: 15,7 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 66 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,69
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,31

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0,550
Length to Beam Ratio: 8,20 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 25,62 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 55 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 2,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0,00 ft / 0,00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 30,00 ft / 9,14 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Mid (50 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Stern: 20,00 ft / 6,10 m
- Average freeboard: 25,03 ft / 7,63 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 106,3 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 188,6 %
Waterplane Area: 36.635 Square feet or 3.403 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 112 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 154 lbs/sq ft or 752 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,98
- Longitudinal: 1,79
- Overall: 1,04
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is adequate
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily



Grosse version 2:
important points modified are shell weight, magazine storage, speed, machinery space, unarmoured ends and armor length.

ADMIRAL CLASS , GERMANY PANZERSCHIFFE KLEIN laid down 1930

Displacement:
18.727 t light; 19.367 t standard; 20.622 t normal; 21.627 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
657,22 ft / 656,17 ft x 80,00 ft x 25,00 ft (normal load)
200,32 m / 200,00 m x 24,38 m x 7,62 m

Armament:
6 - 12,00" / 305 mm guns (2x3 guns), 900,00lbs / 408,23kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, evenly spread
12 - 5,90" / 150 mm guns in single mounts, 102,69lbs / 46,58kg shells, 1930 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts
on side, all amidships
Weight of broadside 6.632 lbs / 3.008 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 60
6 - 20,0" / 508 mm above water torpedoes

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 483,00 ft / 147,22 m 10,73 ft / 3,27 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 7,00" / 178 mm 483,00 ft / 147,22 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 113 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead:
1,00" / 25 mm 483,00 ft / 147,22 m 22,95 ft / 7,00 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 9,00" / 229 mm 3,00" / 76 mm 9,00" / 229 mm
2nd: 1,00" / 25 mm 1,00" / 25 mm -

- Armour deck: 2,00" / 51 mm, Conning tower: 9,00" / 229 mm

Machinery:
Diesel Internal combustion motors,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 117.250 shp / 87.468 Kw = 31,00 kts
Range 10.000nm at 12,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 2.259 tons

Complement:
859 - 1.118

Cost:
£7,638 million / $30,553 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 802 tons, 3,9 %
Armour: 5.963 tons, 28,9 %
- Belts: 3.063 tons, 14,9 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 410 tons, 2,0 %
- Armament: 989 tons, 4,8 %
- Armour Deck: 1.355 tons, 6,6 %
- Conning Tower: 146 tons, 0,7 %
Machinery: 3.553 tons, 17,2 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 8.408 tons, 40,8 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 1.896 tons, 9,2 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
29.520 lbs / 13.390 Kg = 34,2 x 12,0 " / 305 mm shells or 3,8 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,14
Metacentric height 4,6 ft / 1,4 m
Roll period: 15,7 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 61 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,66
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,21

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0,550
Length to Beam Ratio: 8,20 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 25,62 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 56 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 2,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0,00 ft / 0,00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 30,00 ft / 9,14 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Mid (50 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Stern: 20,00 ft / 6,10 m
- Average freeboard: 25,03 ft / 7,63 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 113,0 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 188,6 %
Waterplane Area: 36.635 Square feet or 3.403 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 106 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 149 lbs/sq ft or 728 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,94
- Longitudinal: 1,72
- Overall: 1,00
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is cramped
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily
 
In all honesty guys I don´t know what to think, but I did my best try, you tell me if is worthy:

SCHARNHORST CLASS, GERMANY BATTLECRUISER laid down 1935

Displacement:
29.287 t light; 30.447 t standard; 31.501 t normal; 32.344 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
773,44 ft / 771,00 ft x 90,00 ft (Bulges 100,00 ft) x 26,00 ft (normal load)
235,75 m / 235,00 m x 27,43 m (Bulges 30,48 m) x 7,92 m

Armament:
9 - 12,00" / 305 mm guns (3x3 guns), 900,00lbs / 408,23kg shells, 1935 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, majority forward, 1 raised mount - superfiring
12 - 5,90" / 150 mm guns in single mounts, 102,69lbs / 46,58kg shells, 1935 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, all amidships
Weight of broadside 9.332 lbs / 4.233 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 100

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 12,0" / 305 mm 501,15 ft / 152,75 m 11,38 ft / 3,47 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 11,0" / 279 mm 501,15 ft / 152,75 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 100 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead and Bulges:
1,00" / 25 mm 501,15 ft / 152,75 m 23,87 ft / 7,28 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 12,0" / 305 mm 4,00" / 102 mm 12,0" / 305 mm
2nd: 1,00" / 25 mm 1,00" / 25 mm -

- Armour deck: 4,00" / 102 mm, Conning tower: 11,00" / 279 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 145.106 shp / 108.249 Kw = 31,00 kts
Range 9.000nm at 10,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1.896 tons

Complement:
1.181 - 1.536

Cost:
£12,972 million / $51,887 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 1.126 tons, 3,6 %
Armour: 11.083 tons, 35,2 %
- Belts: 4.762 tons, 15,1 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 443 tons, 1,4 %
- Armament: 2.058 tons, 6,5 %
- Armour Deck: 3.584 tons, 11,4 %
- Conning Tower: 236 tons, 0,8 %
Machinery: 4.122 tons, 13,1 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 12.956 tons, 41,1 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.214 tons, 7,0 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
50.614 lbs / 22.958 Kg = 58,6 x 12,0 " / 305 mm shells or 7,2 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,15
Metacentric height 5,6 ft / 1,7 m
Roll period: 17,8 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 61 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,48
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,21

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0,550
Length to Beam Ratio: 7,71 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 27,77 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 52 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 4,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0,00 ft / 0,00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 35,00 ft / 10,67 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Mid (50 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Stern: 25,00 ft / 7,62 m
- Average freeboard: 25,80 ft / 7,86 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 90,0 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 195,3 %
Waterplane Area: 48.426 Square feet or 4.499 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 111 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 176 lbs/sq ft or 860 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0,98
- Longitudinal: 1,30
- Overall: 1,01
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is adequate
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily


note: the bulges are composite strength measures as well as torpedo protection, but is the limit, can´t go faster or farther without making it bigger, Hood or Bismarck size actually.


like this one, but without the pressure for speed:

MACKENSEN CLASS, GERMANY BATTLESHIP laid down 1937

Displacement:
41.687 t light; 43.530 t standard; 44.614 t normal; 45.482 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
892,30 ft / 890,00 ft x 105,00 ft (Bulges 110,00 ft) x 29,00 ft (normal load)
271,97 m / 271,27 m x 32,00 m (Bulges 33,53 m) x 8,84 m

Armament:
9 - 15,00" / 381 mm guns (3x3 guns), 1.687,50lbs / 765,44kg shells, 1937 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, majority forward, 1 raised mount - superfiring
16 - 5,90" / 150 mm guns in single mounts, 102,69lbs / 46,58kg shells, 1937 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, all amidships
Weight of broadside 16.831 lbs / 7.634 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 100

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 13,0" / 330 mm 578,50 ft / 176,33 m 12,30 ft / 3,75 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 13,0" / 330 mm 578,50 ft / 176,33 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 100 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead and Bulges:
1,00" / 25 mm 578,50 ft / 176,33 m 26,62 ft / 8,11 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 13,0" / 330 mm 5,00" / 127 mm 13,0" / 330 mm
2nd: 2,00" / 51 mm 2,00" / 51 mm -

- Armour deck: 6,00" / 152 mm, Conning tower: 13,00" / 330 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 100.644 shp / 75.081 Kw = 27,00 kts
Range 7.000nm at 10,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1.953 tons

Complement:
1.534 - 1.995

Cost:
£19,728 million / $78,911 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 2.104 tons, 4,7 %
Armour: 17.305 tons, 38,8 %
- Belts: 6.467 tons, 14,5 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 570 tons, 1,3 %
- Armament: 2.677 tons, 6,0 %
- Armour Deck: 7.239 tons, 16,2 %
- Conning Tower: 352 tons, 0,8 %
Machinery: 2.789 tons, 6,3 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 19.488 tons, 43,7 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.928 tons, 6,6 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
79.734 lbs / 36.167 Kg = 47,2 x 15,0 " / 381 mm shells or 12,6 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,16
Metacentric height 7,1 ft / 2,2 m
Roll period: 17,3 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 62 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,48
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,25

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0,550
Length to Beam Ratio: 8,09 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 29,83 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 41 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 4,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0,00 ft / 0,00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 32,82 ft / 10,00 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Mid (50 %): 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Stern: 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Average freeboard: 21,84 ft / 6,66 m
Ship tends to be wet forward

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 69,7 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 169,1 %
Waterplane Area: 65.218 Square feet or 6.059 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 112 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 216 lbs/sq ft or 1.056 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 1,11
- Longitudinal: 1,03
- Overall: 1,05
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily

or this one:

MACKENSEN CLASS, GERMANY BATTLESHIP laid down 1937

Displacement:
41.753 t light; 43.530 t standard; 44.614 t normal; 45.482 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
892,30 ft / 890,00 ft x 105,00 ft (Bulges 110,00 ft) x 29,00 ft (normal load)
271,97 m / 271,27 m x 32,00 m (Bulges 33,53 m) x 8,84 m

Armament:
10 - 14,00" / 356 mm guns (3 mounts), 1.400,00lbs / 635,03kg shells, 1937 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, majority forward, 4 raised guns - superfiring
16 - 5,90" / 150 mm guns in single mounts, 102,69lbs / 46,58kg shells, 1937 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, all amidships
Weight of broadside 15.643 lbs / 7.096 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 100

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 14,0" / 356 mm 578,50 ft / 176,33 m 12,30 ft / 3,75 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 13,0" / 330 mm 578,50 ft / 176,33 m 8,00 ft / 2,44 m
Main Belt covers 100 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead and Bulges:
1,00" / 25 mm 578,50 ft / 176,33 m 26,62 ft / 8,11 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 13,0" / 330 mm 5,00" / 127 mm 13,0" / 330 mm
2nd: 2,00" / 51 mm 2,00" / 51 mm -

- Armour deck: 6,00" / 152 mm, Conning tower: 14,00" / 356 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 115.287 shp / 86.004 Kw = 28,00 kts
Range 7.000nm at 10,00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1.953 tons

Complement:
1.534 - 1.995

Cost:
£19,210 million / $76,839 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 1.920 tons, 4,3 %
Armour: 17.725 tons, 39,7 %
- Belts: 6.769 tons, 15,2 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 570 tons, 1,3 %
- Armament: 2.768 tons, 6,2 %
- Armour Deck: 7.239 tons, 16,2 %
- Conning Tower: 379 tons, 0,9 %
Machinery: 3.195 tons, 7,2 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 18.912 tons, 42,4 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2.862 tons, 6,4 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0,0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
79.798 lbs / 36.196 Kg = 58,2 x 14,0 " / 356 mm shells or 12,7 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1,16
Metacentric height 7,1 ft / 2,2 m
Roll period: 17,3 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 62 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0,45
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1,25

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0,550
Length to Beam Ratio: 8,09 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 29,83 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 43 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 4,00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0,00 ft / 0,00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 32,82 ft / 10,00 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Mid (50 %): 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Stern: 20,88 ft / 6,36 m
- Average freeboard: 21,84 ft / 6,66 m
Ship tends to be wet forward

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 69,7 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 169,1 %
Waterplane Area: 65.218 Square feet or 6.059 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 113 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 210 lbs/sq ft or 1.025 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 1,09
- Longitudinal: 1,00
- Overall: 1,02
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily

note: with the only difference been a slightly higher speed and thicker main belt.

PD: does someone knows how or where to do conversions (online) to other currency (Reich marks in this case) of the period?
 
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The balance of alliances is an awkward one - and one I'll need a little time to get it right (or at least hopefully plausible).

An Anglo-German alliance is very appealing to me (partly because it would be a very different situation), but as Palantir says, it would not be in keeping with British thinking. At present I can;t see that it results in anything other than a German-run Europe, maybe with a British toehold here and there as/when France is 'put down'.
Germany might want British support against Russia, but what do the British get out of it? (given that they don't particularly like either side).
I'll keep thinking there, but I'm not sure it works.

British isolationism and hubris is likely to be very real, probably moreso than in reality. They 'won the war' in Belgium, the Empire is larger than ever, European nations still owe Britain lots of money.
Superficially, they can pat themselves on the back, and be certain that Britain is best ... which could be very dangerous if there is trouble in, for instance, India.

Nevertheless, we can assume that not all Brits will stick their heads in the sand and assume the Empire is independent of the world. A Franco-Italian alliance would be a threat to Britain (unless she was part of it).
At present, I could see an Anglo-Italian alliance/agreement more easily than a close Anglo-French one. Italy hasn't done badly out of the war, there are some historic commercial links, and British and Italian troops and navies have fought together in the various Dalmatian operations in 1915 and '17 (alongside Serbs and Frenchmen). A friendly Italy secures the Med, almost irrespective of what else goes on.
Meanwhile, the British are ruthless enough to know that France has to defend herself against Germany - she doesn't need a close alliance with the British to encourage that.
That's not to say that Britain can afford a hostile France - she can't. A Franco-German alliance would be extremely dangerous for Britain.

And of course it also depends on lots of other things, such as Russia and the Far East.
Russia always seems to be the key here. Sooner or later (like Napoleon's China) Russia will rise.
What does Britain get out of supporting Germany against Russia? The Great Game. Afghanistan is still in play and now there is oil in Persia. Yay.
 
Because they can work on coastal Artillery for port defense, the Germans can prototype some of the guns for the larger units. Make a turret for use to defend the Kiel canal entrances and just try different arrangements for gun size.
 
The Boss Drinks Uncle Joe’s
The Boss Drinks Uncle Joe’s

Since fleeing Bolshevik Russia over his failures in the Polish campaign and his ongoing disagreements with Lenin and Trotsky, Josef Djugashvili, the self-styled ‘Stalin’, had led a precarious life in several European countries.

Initially, he had returned to Vienna, seeking to ferment a new socialist uprising, but this effort soon turned to Germany, where there seemed to be stronger communist movements. However, the moment had passed; Germany might have gone communist in 1918 or ’19, but by the time of Stalin’s arrival in 1921, the German state was stronger and the people were less tempted by the promises of socialism. In order to finance a rebellion in Munich, he returned to one of his previous talents; that of organising bank robberies.
In this area of operations, Stalin proved to be rather successful, and even when most of his gang were shot or rounded up during a siege in 1922, he escaped with enough money to reach Serbia, from where he headed East.

For the next few years, Stalin claimed in his diaries to have been seeking new opportunities to bring revolution to the people, but in practice he seems to have had a variety of dubious occupations in the virtually lawless villages and towns of Southern and Eastern Russia. His mind was clearly not yet free of the grip of socialism, and it was in China that he furthered his ambitions for revolution, by organising local bandits and meeting the leaders of China’s communist movements. Whether he actually had any influence over them is less obvious, but it is certain that he made contact with elements of the Chinese underworld during this period.

By 1927 he had reached Shanghai, where he sought funding for Russian revolutionary movements with the help of his new Chinese comrades. ‘Seeking funds’ actually involved running protection rackets and holding up travellers, with the aid of local Triad gangs, who Stalin seems to have impressed with his capacity for sheer unadulterated brutality as and when it was necessary.
In fact, almost none of the money went to any socialist organisation, as Stalin had identified a new goal; the United States. By this time, it was hard to see the man as any form of communist, and although he perhaps deluded himself that he was acting ‘in the interests of the people’, he had almost effortlessly entered that most capitalist of professions: organised crime.

Laundering funds through his Chinese associates, he changed his name, bought himself a small tanker and had it fitted out. On April 16th, 1928, his ship sailed into San Francisco harbour and began to unload her cargo; nearly 400 tons of Dutch oil, and 800 tons of Chinese-made whiskey and vodka. The stuff was distributed through local Chinese gangs, with Stalin’s share of the profits enough to set him up in business in the States.

Another run with the ship made him another good return, but the Chinese were becoming greedy and Stalin realised that smuggling was too risky. With the assistance of Russian-born Americans, he sold his interests in the tanker and headed inland, realising that while everyone else tried to smuggle alcohol into America, it would be far easier to make it in the country, if it could be done at scale and securely. Just as social revolution could use capitalist infrastructure to promote itself, crime could use legitimate business to disguise itself.
In this approach, he and his select group of Georgian and Russian friends were well ahead of local gangsters. They might have had a front for laundering money and providing some veneer of respectability, but by acquiring influence with the owners of small chemical and petroleum plants, Stalin’s gang industrialised bootlegging, entirely within profitable and legitimate business.
His method of distribution followed the same pattern, but here it was impossible not to tread on the toes of existing gangs, who in the early days often responded the only way they knew how, with violence. Here however, they were rank amateurs in comparison to Stalin and his former Chekists and bandit soldiers. Entire families were butchered without warning, usually leaving only one elderly survivor. That soon sent the word out so effectively that Stalin was soon able to simply use the services of local gangs, in a mutually beneficial and thoroughly profitable way. Anyone who stepped out of line was taken care of.

Many years after his death, it emerged that he gained a great deal of his later legitimacy with the American government through informing the nascent FBI on émigré communists who were then active in America. He also tipped them off about his rivals in the criminal underworld, and in return they did him the occasional favour by damaging his competition. Other than his closest network of associates and his chief of staff, the clever but vile ‘Lawrence’ Beria, everyone was merely a tool to be used, and disposed of as required.
As his businesses expanded, the amount of violence directly attributable to Stalin actually fell, as he recognised that there were always new markets and products to expand into, rather than sitting still and fighting to control a tiny area. By the time prohibition was repealed in 1935, his legitimate income probably exceeded his criminal one.
He had made one other wise move in the preceding years; unlike some American gangsters, Stalin had maintained a low profile, preferring to create a brand around his product rather than himself. When alcoholic beverages became legal once again, his products were already well known, and his industrial-scale production could be rapidly scaled up, unlike the networks of hillbillies and smugglers who were far more numerous, but less organised.

His second fortune was made entirely legitimately, and ‘Josef’s Beverages Incorporated’ was later listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Its post-war advertising campaign, The Boss Drinks Uncle Joe’s, featuring a cheerful-looking Stalin himself, was undoubtedly responsible for skyrocketing sales.

He died at his home in Santa Barbara in 1953, a multi-millionaire, and his funeral was well attended by his employees, his friends, beside a few older associates; men who came to make sure he was dead. Thus ended the life of a communist turned capitalist, a brutal thug turned genial marketing icon. A man for whom the control of information and the romantic mythology of the gangster made into something of a hero.
Even today, his smiling moustached face can be seen on every bottle of Uncle Joe’s Tennessee Whiskey, one of America’s most valuable brands.
 
So communism seems to be pretty much dead, while facism will have a much harder time getting off the ground. So far, a much better world, assuming some new ideology doesn't pop up or the Japanese go nuts in China
 
Lets be fair guys, Spain with all her faults, deserve a better treatment and more than anyone to rise and be a Great Power again, a monarchical one if you ask, that's her historical setup, and in truth what was lacking in Spain was a patriotic (not nationalist), decent and competent political class for running the country and bring stability, because all the ingredients were there, what was lacking was a good chief to make the salad.
 
So, European Diploatic relations.

Bear with me on this post I'm on my mobile.

Why Is everyone so convinced that France is annoyed with Britain and that Britain is on cloud 9 and ignoring the world. That may have been the case after the war was over but now its 6 years later and the world has evolved.

Let's take Britain for instance, yes things are going well but it's not all smooth sailing right now. Japan is growing in the east, the Anglo Japanese treaty was already starting to run its course OTL by 1920 and I dont see any reason it will be any different here. That is something Britain has to keep an eye on. Then you have Germany, yes Germany lost the war but they're only down not out. Both Britain and France have to keep an eye on the situation in Germany. That by itself is enough to get France and Britain talking at least. The fact The Netherlands has a stronger navy now is a reason for Britain at least to be friendly with them. Not just to keep them away from the rising Germany but also as they could be useful in countering Japan. That again Benefits the Dutch possessions. Greece is another potential ally for Britain because of its navy helping balance the other smaller powers along with Italy. Yes I know the ships a lot of these powers have are obsolescent but they are still dangerous.

Basically, whilst there may have been some animosity between the victorius European powers post war now you have reasons to start bringing them together. Also whilst this world is in many ways better off due to the shorter and less costly war you also have a lot of scenarios that could create problems down the line.
 
Director of Italian Railways; he never made the trains run on time, but did manage to standardise architecture, particularly lamp posts...:)
to be fair to the man the trains were on average much closer to running on time when he left office then when he entered it by a whole 55%
 
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