Dominion of America, Part of the British Empire...For How Long?

There's some bits of background notes I'd like to make before my question:

1. The thirteen colonies and British Armed Forces resorting to force, of course, almost didn't happen and was almost averted numerous times during the leadup to the ARW. The colonists sent numerous petitions, the British had many sympathetic to the colonies, even then what could be termed proto-responsible government for individual colonies (Pitt's Provisional Act in 1774 and the Carlisle Peace Commission in 1778) or flat-out proto-Dominion status for the entire lot (Galloway's Plan of Union shamelessly stealing from Franklin's Albany Plan) were developed. A century earlier than implemented.

2. Even AFTER the ARW happened and the USA gained independence it might have been nominally independent... but culturally, economically, and even personally was very much tied to Britain for the rest of the 18th and much of the 19th century. And politics did depend heavily on British concerns till 1815 and occasionally still crop up afterwards (I'm looking at you, 1818, Texas, Webster-Ashburton, and Oregon). So for much of its 'independent' history Britain mattered much to America. Something to remember as butterflies develop in TTL.

3. Military matters. Even on its very own, sans colonial troops, Britain could take on the USA for much of that time (even if it'd be a bitch to take on America, in fairness to my fellow Yankees and proven twice in OTL) and America usually isn't considered a 'world power' till freaking 1898.

Till then America's military power unless a war was happening was pretty laughable and even during some wars themselves (witness the size during the Mexican-American War, or blundering in 1812...the Civil War might arguably be the shining moment of American prowess till 1898).

3. OTOH economics-wise and population-wise America was utterly booming. It was matching Britain (I believe) population-wise by the 1840s and economically surpassing Britain by the 1870s. Again, I may be wrong, but roughly somewhere on those lines.

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So, with all those considerations, my questions are this.

Like many a TL before, assume America's revolution is averted and British America becomes a dominion. But, a dominion still within the British Empire, like Canada and Australia and New Zealand of OTL with military and foreign affairs handled by the mother country. So with that scenario on the cards:

1. When would the Dominion of (North) America gain complete independence, as in full control of its own foreign affairs and military stuff? Please note that I'm assuming in this scenario that DoA is still very friendly and caring to the mother country and vice-versa, but the aformentioned stats of the OTL USA in economics and population means that it would become unwieldy to govern from London in some form with even the best of intentions. Something would have to give way. But what?

2. How would the concept of responsible government and dominion status and what have you arising in the late 18th century affect any other British settler colonies founded in the future? Even the Empire itself? I assume Australia has a shot of developing ala OTL if America shuts itself off from convict shipping, for example, but would those colonies be given a bit more self-government sooner, from the get-go, etc? Would any settler colonies (colonies in general, really) in turn be federated sooner? After all, Canada was the first dominion in 1867. Here America did it in 1776 or 1783 or whatever equivalent date you wish for. Plenty of time to work out kinks in the system.

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I'm assuming things turn out roughly similar to our world in historical terms since dominion status (re: being able to do things for themselves, simply with a constitutional monarch at the top) and being far-off across the sea means in turn America's development can go de-facto similar in turn. IE, Americans head out west and gradually overwhelm Amerindians, the north/south divide still happens and some physical conflict, perhaps squabbles with New Spain/Mexico/etc. in the southwest, still all about individual rights and economic opportunity (rather like Canada and Australia in OTL), etc.

In turn, I'm assuming world history beyond America goes roughly similar. French Revolution and ensuring wars, a post-bellum conservatism across western civilization, etc. Would fighting alongside Britain during the French Revolutionary Wars be the WW1 equivalent for America, say? How much and long would Britain negotiate for America on the world stage then and afterwards?

TL;DR assuming America is a dominion and world history remains broadly or roughly still familiar, how long would it stay formally part of the British Empire/affect would-be future dominions and colonies?
 
There would be some conflict with Britain over Manifest Destiny, for sure. Britain won't like some upstart colonialists trying to take land from Mexico, but with the Atlantic in their way, I can't really see them stop American settlers in Texas and Florida... which could be interesting.
 
I now realize my attempts to give some OTL historical considerations/parallels have now ended up making me look like I ramble endlessly, but whoops.

Honestly, it's not until any really western land claims that I see trouble and that's averted (maybe) by the USA willing to merely buy the Rio Grande and 37th parallel north from Mexico in OTL and nothing else. With what would be *Canada and some of the West Indies joining the DoA it might be enough to placate expansionism...
 
A dominion could be possible in my opinion.

England didn't want expansion beyond the Appalachian mountains. But it would be impossible for England to stop the migration and difficult to lay any claim on the area. I could see settlers moving in and creating their own country in the area between the Appalachians and the Sierra Nevada.

However as technology improved there could be a North American Boer War. By 1900 North America could be mostly a single country under the British Crown.
 
Honestly, I don't think you have any type of parallel history of America develop with such a massive (in my opinion) POD. Conflicts between the Dominion and the British Government would erupt almost immediately over important issues such as the native americans, westward expansion, slavery, trade, and international relations with, most notably Spain and France.

Glen has posited a plausible alternative history in his very well written and researched Dominion of Southern America. He deals with many of these issues very well, even if I personally think the butterflies would have created a far different looking North America.
 
The colonists sent numerous petitions, the British had many sympathetic to the colonies, even then what could be termed proto-responsible government for individual colonies (Pitt's Provisional Act in 1774 and the Carlisle Peace Commission in 1778) or flat-out proto-Dominion status for the entire lot (Galloway's Plan of Union shamelessly stealing from Franklin's Albany Plan) were developed. A century earlier than implemented.

Hrm. On the other hand...

Carlisle didn't come along until after Saratoga, after all. And when was an English city ever treated like Boston was before the Revolution?

3. Military matters. Even on its very own, sans colonial troops, Britain could take on the USA for much of that time (even if it'd be a bitch to take on America, in fairness to my fellow Yankees and proven twice in OTL) and America usually isn't considered a 'world power' till freaking 1898.

Till then America's military power unless a war was happening was pretty laughable and even during some wars themselves (witness the size during the Mexican-American War, or blundering in 1812...the Civil War might arguably be the shining moment of American prowess till 1898).

I'm not sure about military matters. America didn't need a large military; when we did, as the Civil War shows, we built one up.

I'm not sure why the Mexican American War is a bad example, though.


1. When would the Dominion of (North) America gain complete independence, as in full control of its own foreign affairs and military stuff? Please note that I'm assuming in this scenario that DoA is still very friendly and caring to the mother country and vice-versa, but the aformentioned stats of the OTL USA in economics and population means that it would become unwieldy to govern from London in some form with even the best of intentions. Something would have to give way. But what?

Well, look at Chanak in OTL. When Canadian itnersets diverged from British intersts, Canada jumped ship.

2. How would the concept of responsible government and dominion status and what have you arising in the late 18th century affect any other British settler colonies founded in the future? Even the Empire itself? I assume Australia has a shot of developing ala OTL if America shuts itself off from convict shipping, for example, but would those colonies be given a bit more self-government sooner, from the get-go, etc? Would any settler colonies (colonies in general, really) in turn be federated sooner? After all, Canada was the first dominion in 1867. Here America did it in 1776 or 1783 or whatever equivalent date you wish for. Plenty of time to work out kinks in the system.

Hrmm. What's interesting is that until 1867, the British Empire is actually a series of autocratic governors ruling over India. So, I'm not sure.
 
It really depends on how the matters in the Ohio area are settled.

Regardless of decrees, western settlers are still going to move into the area, and bring themselves into conflict with the tribes. By this time, both the tribes and the settlers were so embittered by the warfare that it would take an almost ASB amount of luck to keep conflict from occurring.

If Britain sides with the tribes, you might see a bunch of independent "American" republics popping up here and there as they move west without the government's support. Very Boer-like situation could develop there. Then you get to the matter of how the colonies actually feel about the whole thing, and make no mistake there'll be plenty of sympathy for those settlers whether they deserve it or not. Seeing as western settlement was one of the primary issues of the Revolution, things could get worse from there.

If they take the colonists side, they'll buy loyalty for a long time, but I think we can all agree that's not a particularly happy world either.
 
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