Deaths from Irish potatoe famine mitigated

As it says, how is it possible to change the death toll? Most sources say up to a million died, and another million forced to leave for someplace else.

My first thought is the British use the Irish for labor in colonies around the world, instead of turning to labor from the Indian subcontinent. Also perhaps the Quebecois become fearful of their lands becoming majority protestant, so they make moves to encourage the Irish to move to Canada.

Texas is another place I think they could go, in fact I imagine they would be preferred to Americans.

Any other ideas?
 
The potato famine was so terrible in OTL due to 2 main reasons: various British news sources either downplaying the events or politicians trying to involve personal agendas into the event, which made the rest of the Isles simply ignore the issue, seeing it as a plot from a party to get votes and the over-reliance of the Irish people on the harvest of Potatoes, it was the main source of food for the Irish at this time as the country was not only the poorest in Europe, but also the most mistreated in the British Isles, since they weren't Protestants like the Scottish, but Catholic.
So either of those could be changed, either Ireland gets early home rule and is able to spread it's own news and sources, growing a more stable economy and a national nutrition that doesn't rely on a single product, or the British have a less turbulent administration at the time, giving the Irish more resources and investments as well as asking for aid from the average person from the Isles and abroad.
 

N7Buck

Banned
Britain doesn't lose it's colonies, so corn laws don't happen, and there is increased supply of grain, which means it is cheaper to import to Ireland. And perhaps increased presence of Maze in the Isles.
 
Depends on the POD and when it happens.
Irish being used as labour in the colonies.
This was done in the time of Cromwell when the Irish were sent as indentured labour to the colonies in the Americas.
The simplest way to reduce death would be to supply food.
Then you need to think about where you will send the people as the economic model that supported them is broken. So 2 million or more would need to be moved.
Moving that many people at the time will result in a lot of deaths.
Texas was independent by 1836 and part of the US by 1845 and I do not think would welcome starving Irish Catholics
 
Britain doesn't lose it's colonies, so corn laws don't happen, and there is increased supply of grain, which means it is cheaper to import to Ireland. And perhaps increased presence of Maze in the Isles.
The effect of tariff-free imports of wheat from the Americas would reduce the price of wheat in the British isles so less would have been grown in Ireland and Britain and the price of rented land would not have gone up as much.
Wheat was the cash crop the Irish used to pay the rent on their land. Potatoes were what they eat themselves. The high price of wheat for export to England lead to the rents rising and more land being used to grow wheat. To feed themselves the only crop that could feed the Irish on the marginal land left that was not fit to grow wheat was the potato.
Given the power of the land gentry in the Brtish isles, this would be opposed by the house lords as it would reduce the income the big estates made from growing wheat and the rents from tenant farmers. So even with the American colonies still being in the empire, there would be pressure to put tariffs on imported wheat to maintain profit for the big estates.
Maize was not a good food source for the Irish, there were only 2 mills in the country that could grind it.
It also needs to be cooked for longer and needs more fuel to cook it. There was a fuel shortage due to the bad weather making the drying of peat almost impossible.
The Irish feed maize suffered from scurvy and digestive problems. due to lack of proper cooking and grinding and the fact that maize has little vitamin c compared to potatoes.
Corn laws were about the importation of wheat for sale in the UK.

Maize does not grow well in Ireland as the climate is not suitable.
 
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The simplest way to reduce death would be to supply food.
This. IOTL the British government was basically like 'Irish Catholics? Nah let 'em starve'. I mean, they didn't do nothing but what they did do was ineffective af, especially once the public works projects got rolling. Those actually CONTRIBUTED to the death toll rather than mitigated it.
 
This. IOTL the British government was basically like 'Irish Catholics? Nah let 'em starve'. I mean, they didn't do nothing but what they did do was ineffective af, especially once the public works projects got rolling. Those actually CONTRIBUTED to the death toll rather than mitigated it.
It is not as simple as that.
 

N7Buck

Banned
This. IOTL the British government was basically like 'Irish Catholics? Nah let 'em starve'. I mean, they didn't do nothing but what they did do was ineffective af, especially once the public works projects got rolling. Those actually CONTRIBUTED to the death toll rather than mitigated it.
The lack of "effective" relief has more to do with the attitudes of the times, which giving people stuff for free even when they are starving was not acceptable. The public works were one of the few ways they could relieve the famine during those times, the issue was they weren't doing enough. The public works saved hundreds of thousands if not millions of lives.
 

N7Buck

Banned
The effect of tariff-free imports of wheat from the Americas would reduce the price of wheat in the British isles so less would have been grown in Ireland and Britain and the price of rented land would not have gone up as much.
How much would this reduced the famine?
And post-Revolution, migration to the US decreased singificantly. With the ARW averted immigration remains high, how much Irish migration would there be, and to what extent would that diminish the famine.
 
How much would this reduced the famine?
And post-Revolution, migration to the US decreased singificantly. With the ARW averted immigration remains high, how much Irish migration would there be, and to what extent would that diminish the famine.
Hard to say.
 
It is problematic when the guy in charge of the situation had this to say:

"The judgment of God sent the calamity to teach the Irish a lesson, that calamity must not be too much mitigated. …The real evil with which we have to contend is not the physical evil of the Famine, but the moral evil of the selfish, perverse and turbulent character of the people"

Averting the Potato Famine in Ireland would be to reform the land system as well as the Corn Laws. After all the potato famine is better called the European Potato Famines and was known at the time as the Hungry 40's.
 
I remember reading somewhere that the British government was turning away foreign aid, but I'm not sure how true that is.

Insert Dan Quayle joke about the title here.
 
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