DBWI:If FDR ran in the 1944 election?

President Franklin D Roosevelt was close to running for a record 4th term in 1944 before he of course decided not to due to the advice from his doctors.

FDR’s popularity of course led Vice President Henry Wallace to get the nomination despite a strong challenge from Missouri Senator Harry Truman and then in November the ticket of Vice President Henry Wallace and Illinois Senator Scott W Lucas defeated the Republican ticket of Thomas Dewey and John Bricker in a landslide that November. Wallace would be the first sitting Vice President in 100+ years to win the presidency since Martin Van Buren

President Wallace immediately had to deal with the war going on in Europe and the Pacific though he objected to use of Nuclear weapons on Japan or Germany and called for a ground invasion of Japan in late 1945 know as Operation Downfall which ended up with the capture of Tokyo in January of 1946.

Domestic wise Wallace set out a line of post war New Deal plans and a tax on the wealthiest Amercians in order to pay what would become the first American public healthcare which still is in system today I am of course talking about SocialAid.

He beat Robert Taft in 1948 for reelection in a slightly bigger landslide.

Unfortunately in his second term he hit some walls such as McCarthyist attacks though that would stop when he and his NATO allies declared war on communist China which resulted in the Mainland war in 1950 a war that would last till 1953 and resulted in a cease fire and the splitting of China into 2 countries.

A recession in 1951 and his dismissal of General Douglas McArthur plus people started to think the size of the government was getting too big.

Harry Truman beat out Vice President Lucas in 1952 for the Democratic nomination but he would lose to the ticket to Douglas McArthur and Charles Hallack in a close election making Douglas McArthur the 34th President of the United States.

Anyways what do you think would of happened if FDR ran for a 4th term in 1944? Do you think World War II would have ended differently? How does FDR deal with planning for post war America? Does Wallace still end up running in 1948?
 
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It depends to a large degree on whether his doctors were right and how soon he dies. I heard that FDR was going to get rid of Wallace and go with Truman as his VP. I don't know much about Truman's career in Congress. I'm fairly certain that he wouldn't have gotten us involved in a land war in Asia.
 
It depends to a large degree on whether his doctors were right and how soon he dies. I heard that FDR was going to get rid of Wallace and go with Truman as his VP. I don't know much about Truman's career in Congress. I'm fairly certain that he wouldn't have gotten us involved in a land war in Asia.
Truman would have been the more centrist president at least compared to Wallace through Truman was very outspoken against Operation Downfall and supported the use of atomic weapons.
 
PRC soldiers during the battle of First Battle of Taipei in October of 1950
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I'm still surprised that more Americans are not still angry at Wallace for not using the bomb on the Japanese. I mean Operation Downfall cost tens of thousands of American lives. I don't know if the Japanese would have surrendered before 1946, but it wouldn't have hurt. After all there were also almost a million Japanese who starved to death in 1945 between August and December.
 
I'm still surprised that more Americans are not still angry at Wallace for not using the bomb on the Japanese. I mean Operation Downfall cost tens of thousands of American lives. I don't know if the Japanese would have surrendered before 1946, but it wouldn't have hurt. After all there were also almost a million Japanese who starved to death in 1945 between August and December.
Wallace did it because he thought the Soviets were gonna invade Japan if they didn’t go ahead in that period of time.
 
91B13133-EB67-40DB-9012-6389598A102A.jpeg

The start of the of Operation Olympic the main mission of Operation Downfall in December 1945.

US Marines in this picture are landing in Kyūshū
 
I'm still surprised that more Americans are not still angry at Wallace for not using the bomb on the Japanese. I mean Operation Downfall cost tens of thousands of American lives. I don't know if the Japanese would have surrendered before 1946, but it wouldn't have hurt. After all there were also almost a million Japanese who starved to death in 1945 between August and December.

I don’t know if it would have mattered. The Allies were bombing Japan straight to hell anyway; no amount of atomic firepower is going to get a crazy bastard like Hideki Tojo to throw up his hands and say, “Fuck it, we surrender.”

Frankly, Downfall went as well as the US could have asked - the damn Soviets stayed back, the Emperor and his family peacefully went into exile in Switzerland, and the US helped build the Republic of Japan into a powerhouse of an ally that it has counted on since the late 1940s. Plus plenty of disaffected young Americans took jobs in mainland Japan and the Okinawa territory, giving Japan the nickname “The Eastern Land of Opportunity.”

My wife and I were dating in college and studied together for a year in Yokohama, and we consider the place something of a second home. It’s a lovely blend of American and Japanese culture woven together intricately and with grace and respect.

Soviet boots on Japanese soil would have torpedoed all this. Thankfully Wallace was in no mood to put up with Stalin’s shit - some people thought Wallace was a Communist sympathizer, but he really just didn’t get along with Stalin and thought the USSR was trouble.
 
I don’t know if it would have mattered. The Allies were bombing Japan straight to hell anyway; no amount of atomic firepower is going to get a crazy bastard like Hideki Tojo to throw up his hands and say, “Fuck it, we surrender.”

Frankly, Downfall went as well as the US could have asked - the damn Soviets stayed back, the Emperor and his family peacefully went into exile in Switzerland, and the US helped build the Republic of Japan into a powerhouse of an ally that it has counted on since the late 1940s. Plus plenty of disaffected young Americans took jobs in mainland Japan and the Okinawa territory, giving Japan the nickname “The Eastern Land of Opportunity.”

My wife and I were dating in college and studied together for a year in Yokohama, and we consider the place something of a second home. It’s a lovely blend of American and Japanese culture woven together intricately and with grace and respect.

Soviet boots on Japanese soil would have torpedoed all this. Thankfully Wallace was in no mood to put up with Stalin’s shit - some people thought Wallace was a Communist sympathizer, but he really just didn’t get along with Stalin and thought the USSR was trouble.
The US and Britain of course welcomed the New Republic of Japan into the UN with open arms in 1947
 
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FDR wouldn't have survived a fourth term. In OTL he died in 1948. The stress of the war would have killed him even faster.

Depending on exactly when the war ends and when he dies, the 1946 and 1948 elections could have very different results. FDR as a martyr and the postwar honeymoon would be good for the Democrats, while the inevitable postwar recession and the bloom being off the rose would help the GOP. Which leads to a lot of butterflies in terms of domestic policy.
 
FDR wouldn't have survived a fourth term. In OTL he died in 1948. The stress of the war would have killed him even faster.

Depending on exactly when the war ends and when he dies, the 1946 and 1948 elections could have very different results. FDR as a martyr and the postwar honeymoon would be good for the Democrats, while the inevitable postwar recession and the bloom being off the rose would help the GOP. Which leads to a lot of butterflies in terms of domestic policy.
I think Truman would have been less popular than Wallace. Granted he would have been a popular president still but I don’t think he would have changed the Democratic Party the way Wallace and Roosevelt
 
Since MacArthur led the successful invasion of Japan, it is no surprise that he was elected President in 1952. Had Wallace used the nuclear bomb, it would have involved fewer troops but more Japanese deaths.
 
Since MacArthur led the successful invasion of Japan, it is no surprise that he was elected President in 1952. Had Wallace used the nuclear bomb, it would have involved fewer troops but more Japanese deaths.
McArthur was on a roll in 1952 with his campaign but I think if Vice President Lucas didn’t drop out of the race because of that bad fall he had that broke his left leg I think he would have been the most likely Democrat to win that year
 
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It depends to a large degree on whether his doctors were right and how soon he dies. I heard that FDR was going to get rid of Wallace and go with Truman as his VP. I don't know much about Truman's career in Congress. I'm fairly certain that he wouldn't have gotten us involved in a land war in Asia.
Lmao what? By all accounts, FDR was going to pick William O. Douglas
 
FDR’s popularity of course led Vice President Henry Wallace to get the nomination despite a strong challenge from Missouri Senator Harry Truman...
Wallace was popular with rank-and-file delegates, but was strongly opposed by several key party insiders - which is why FDR dropped him as Vice President.

Truman had no thought of running for President or Vice President until FDR tapped him. The probable rival to Wallace would be James Bowles, former Senator and Supreme Court Justice, who had run the domestic war economy for FDR (with his office in the White House; he was dubbed "the assistant President").

Also, Wallace had a dangerous vulnerability. In the early 1930s, Wallace had been a follower of Nicholas Roerich, an emigré Russian Theosophist. Republicans had letters from Wallace to Roerich, addressing him as "Dear Guru" and filled with mystical jargon. Wallace had broken with Roerich in the mid-30s, but the letters would still be very damaging. (They weren't used in 1940 because Democrats threatened to retaliate by revealing Willkie's adultery with socialite Irita Van Doren. But the Democrats had nothing on Dewey.)
 
Wallace was popular with rank-and-file delegates, but was strongly opposed by several key party insiders - which is why FDR dropped him as Vice President.

Truman had no thought of running for President or Vice President until FDR tapped him. The probable rival to Wallace would be James Bowles, former Senator and Supreme Court Justice, who had run the domestic war economy for FDR (with his office in the White House; he was dubbed "the assistant President").

Also, Wallace had a dangerous vulnerability. In the early 1930s, Wallace had been a follower of Nicholas Roerich, an emigré Russian Theosophist. Republicans had letters from Wallace to Roerich, addressing him as "Dear Guru" and filled with mystical jargon. Wallace had broken with Roerich in the mid-30s, but the letters would still be very damaging. (They weren't used in 1940 because Democrats threatened to retaliate by revealing Willkie's adultery with socialite Irita Van Doren. But the Democrats had nothing on Dewey.)
((OOC:You know this is a DBWI right?))
 
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