DBQ: Why exactly did Communism succeed in Japan?

So I understand that there were a number of circumstances that led to a rise in popularity with socialism and communism in Japan, including the very costly Japanese victory in the Russo-Japanese War and many people feeling cheated out of expansion in Asia when Britain and France split German colonies in Asia after WW1 (which led to a lot of anti-Western anger), but what exactly made communism so successful that it managed to win so decisively over the Imperialists and the monarchy in 1928? Was the Communist overthrow of the government actually inevitable like many people think? The Imperial Japanese Army and Imperial Japanese Navy weren't weak by any means, and they were incredibly loyal to the emperor, so much that they even looked up to the emperor as an arahitogami (a living god). On paper, it does seem like the the Army and Navy ministers in the Diet could just call upon the Army and Navy respectively to put down any attempted Communist takeover. Besides, many of the men in Japan's armed forces enlisted because of the extreme poverty they were in and because of the fact that the Army and Navy provided for them.
So aside from the question regarding how exactly communism succeeded in Japan, I think another question would be how likely was it for them to lose? What would be a good POD to prevent the Communist takeover from happening?
 
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I think a more competent Emperor was the most needed thing. Taking personal responsibility for leading Japan's crusade against the Russian revolution meant the core institutions of the empire were undermined by the resulting failure. And it meant millions of miserable Japanese conscripts were made vulnerable to Russian propaganda efforts. And perhaps more seriously for the regime, thousands of low-level officers too. All of the important leaders of the revolution held the rank of captain or less during the Russian intervention.

Even so, the Japanese Empire could have just scraped through without the economic crisis in the US. Even delaying the start of the Great Depression by 2 years might have allowed the regime time to get a grip before the quick succession of crises overwhelmed them.

fasquardon
 
So I understand that there were a number of circumstances that led to a rise in popularity with socialism or communism in Japan, including Japan winning the Russo-Japanese War very costly and many people feeling cheated out of expansion in Asia when Britain and France split German colonies in Asia after WW1 (which led to a lot of anti-Western anger), but what exactly made communism so successful that it managed to win so decisively over the Imperialists and the monarchy in 1928? Was the Communist overthrow of the government actually inevitable like some people think? The Imperial Japanese Army and Imperial Japanese Navy weren't weak by any means, and they were incredibly loyal to the emperor, so much that they even looked up to the emperor as an arahitogami (a living god). On paper, it does seem like the the Army and Navy ministers in the Diet could just call upon the Army and Navy respectively to put down any attempted Communist takeover. Besides, many of the men in Japan's armed forces enlisted because of the extreme poverty they were in and because of the fact that the Army and Navy provided for them.
So aside from the question regarding how exactly communism succeeded in Japan, I think another question would be how likely was it for them to lose? What would be a good POD to prevent the Communist takeover from happening?

I think a more competent Emperor was the most needed thing. Taking personal responsibility for leading Japan's crusade against the Russian revolution meant the core institutions of the empire were undermined by the resulting failure. And it meant millions of miserable Japanese conscripts were made vulnerable to Russian propaganda efforts. And perhaps more seriously for the regime, thousands of low-level officers too. All of the important leaders of the revolution held the rank of captain or less during the Russian intervention.

Even so, the Japanese Empire could have just scraped through without the economic crisis in the US. Even delaying the start of the Great Depression by 2 years might have allowed the regime time to get a grip before the quick succession of crises overwhelmed them.

fasquardon

One russian word

Mladorossi

The japanese version of bolshevism, copying the model created by Alexander Kazembek (he is not important here in the west, and a small figure in Russia, but a big guy in Japan) allowed Japan to adopt a version of bolshevism that didn't rejected it's monarchical traditions. By forcing Hirohito to abidicate after the war and raising the young Akihito as a communist, Japan was able to create this strange blend of both ideologies that worked so well.

Maybe if they decided to kill the royal family or something, instead of admiting from day one that they would respect it, could prevent the communist takeover.
 
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