Cities that could have been much larger

In terms of economy, is Providence, RI midway between New York, NY and Greater Boston? IDK but I would imagine in OTL NY, NY and Boston have delegated much of its seafaring of commercial shipment outside of the metropolises. Then maybe Providence can perform some kind of high tech secondary sector of industry?
It's closer to Boston (if traffic permits it's a bit over an hour's drive) than New York and nowadays basically is part of Greater Boston. The Boston area got the high tech industry too OTL. Midway between Boston and NYC is more Connecticut like Hartford or New Haven or New London.
 
Halifax was mentioned earlier, but not the how, allow me to. With the avoiding of the national policy by not joining Canada, but creating their own maritime dominion, Halifax wouldn't be cut out from the Caribbean-Maritime-Britain trade, and would be much closer to Boston. Even if it wasn't the capitol of the new Dominion, it was the better known port of call along with the naval base.
 

htgriffin

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Halifax was mentioned earlier, but not the how, allow me to. With the avoiding of the national policy by not joining Canada, but creating their own maritime dominion, Halifax wouldn't be cut out from the Caribbean-Maritime-Britain trade, and would be much closer to Boston. Even if it wasn't the capitol of the new Dominion, it was the better known port of call along with the naval base.
So we are speaking of much stronger economic, social, cultural, and political links to the (post)British West Indies then?
 
It's closer to Boston (if traffic permits it's a bit over an hour's drive) than New York and nowadays basically is part of Greater Boston. The Boston area got the high tech industry too OTL. Midway between Boston and NYC is more Connecticut like Hartford or New Haven or New London.
So can Hartford be a high tech secondary sector about maritime shipment and voyage center? IDK but Hartford had a ice hockey team Whalers: that name speaks of its past fishery capacities.
 
So can Hartford be a high tech secondary sector about maritime shipment and voyage center? IDK but Hartford had a ice hockey team Whalers: that name speaks of its past fishery capacities.
Hartford is too far upriver, they never really had whaling or fishing, the Whalers name comes from when the team was the New England whalers out of Boston. Hartford's big industry was and is insurance, they were the insurance capital of the world for awhile and still are big in that. High tech is a maybe, they were hightech in the mid 1800's, but don't really have the appropriate educational institutions nearby for it now
 
Halifax was mentioned earlier, but not the how, allow me to.
In OTL, Halifax and Nova Scotia are connected to the Canadian landmass by sea and by road. Specifically, CFB Halifax and Port of Halifax are still functioning and the later is connected to the CN Railway.
IDK but an ATL would include further development of Halifax of its port facilities.
 
P.A. is located about the 53rd parallel (53o12'N). The following cities or communities with significant populations in the Prairies are:
  • Flin Flon, Manitoba 54.46N
  • The Pas, MB 53°49′30″N 101°15′12″W
  • Lloydminster, Alberta 53.16N
  • N. Battleford, Sask 52o45'27"N
  • Grande Prairie, AB 55o10'15"N
  • Fort McMurray, AB 56o43'35"N
Waiving P.A., a branch of the CPR could've linked the Saskatchewan River Fork (53o15'N) (SRF) with the other cities above across along the 53rd parallel and the rivers (N. Sask and S. Sask) and Lake Winnipeg could provide river traffic that could sprawl the Prairies provinces.
On Google map... Fort McMurray is not exactly on that rough straightline; however, FM could be the station midway to the NWT. However, if the Pas, MB is added, things start to look up because...

In the OTL, rail transport connects Thompson, MB with The Pas, MB and The Pas, MB with Winnipeg, MB. So in an ATL, a branch of a railway or even the CPR can be extended from the Pas westward to the SRF (then waived P.A.) and then to Grand Prairie. With that, rail transport can go directly from GP, AB to Churchill, MB without traveling south to Winnipeg, MB.

phx1138's idea is fulfilled as rail transport links Winnipeg to The Pas and a new branch of rail could have connected The Pas with SFK.

If that Arkenfolm's idea came into fruition, the Port of Churchill, MB could serve as subarctic and arctic international shipment for the Prairies, Northern Ontario and the American states near the border: ship the cargo downstream thru canals and rivers or by rail to the PoC.
For what it worth, Russia is planning to build more floating nuclear plant. The Small Modular reactors (SMRs) were reported to be in future plan.
In the future, an ATL could include one or more Canadian floating SMRs anchored in the PoC. With electricity, water desalination for drinking water from the Hudson Bay would be possible, given that the low salinity than ocean seawater. Water supply would help vertical farming...
Hydroponic produce is blooming in Churchill, Man.

This railmap is more appropriately describing my past viewpoints. Churchill, MB is connected to The Pas, MB by rail. Then in an ATL, build another rail to connect The Pas, MB or Flin Flon, MB with SFK, Sask (waived P.A. Sask.) and then all the way to Grand Prairie, AB.
 
Cairo, Illinois, it is on the Mississippi and the Ohio, so you have good access to a waterway to transport stuff. If it gets big enough you can have it merge with St Louis similar to what happened to Dallas and Fort Worth in Texas which became the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.
 
Cairo, Illinois, it is on the Mississippi and the Ohio, so you have good access to a waterway to transport stuff. If it gets big enough you can have it merge with St Louis similar to what happened to Dallas and Fort Worth in Texas which became the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.
They are MUCH further apart...

That said, yeah, I'm always fond of the Cairo displacing St Louis. Among other things, it seems to me like the earlier one gets western settlement the more advantages Cairo has.
 
They are MUCH further apart...

That said, yeah, I'm always fond of the Cairo displacing St Louis. Among other things, it seems to me like the earlier one gets western settlement the more advantages Cairo has.
It has the crippling disadvantage of being massively vulnerable to floods that even if they don't destroy the city essentially cut it off from contact. That's a huge part of why Cairo is not a major city while St. Louis is guaranteed to be a major city. Too much flood protection is needed that it has no real advantage over Paducah, KY just a bit upstream on the Ohio.
 
They are MUCH further apart...

That said, yeah, I'm always fond of the Cairo displacing St Louis. Among other things, it seems to me like the earlier one gets western settlement the more advantages Cairo has.
You're right, but urban areas can stretch pretty far.
 
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It has the crippling disadvantage of being massively vulnerable to floods that even if they don't destroy the city essentially cut it off from contact. That's a huge part of why Cairo is not a major city while St. Louis is guaranteed to be a major city. Too much flood protection is needed that it has no real advantage over Paducah, KY just a bit upstream on the Ohio.
You're right, Cairo, Illinois is on a floodplain.
scary-spring-flood-map.jpg
 
That also opens the possibility of Wickliffe Ky becoming the real center of any "Cairo Metropolitan Area". Certainly if it were a city of any size you'd have meaningful, directly adjacent, settlements in all three states.
 
That also opens the possibility of Wickliffe Ky becoming the real center of any "Cairo Metropolitan Area". Certainly if it were a city of any size you'd have meaningful, directly adjacent, settlements in all three states.
Four states, as the far northwest corner of Tennessee would be part of this area as well. Although speaking of Wickliffe, KY, it does beg the question why Paducah somewhat upstream ended up the major river port and not Wickliffe.
 
I've got no insight into what happened with Wickliffe vs Paducah.

That said, while St Louis still feels ambitious, I would say that a metroplex more or less encompassing Paducah to Cape Girardeau MO to Union City TN isn't completely unreasonable in size if you think in terms of it's growth being at the cost of St Louis, Louisville, Nashville and Memphis.
 
"For example, the Ohio cities of Sandusky and Toledo momentarily posed a threat to Cleveland and Detroit. Located on a large protected bay, Sandusky was, according to one local booster, 'the most eligible point in the whole Northwest for a great commercial city' and a leading contender for the northern terminus of the Ohio Canal. Instead, in what Sandusky residents viewed as 'the most stupendous fraud perpetrated,' Ohio's legislators named Cleveland as the outlet for the waterway. Years later business leaders in the angry city were still complaining of 'the partiality and blindness of early state legislation' which 'retarded the wise designs of nature, by building up rivals.'..." https://books.google.com/books?id=cHvo-Nr4bFkC&pg=PA21

Local boosters always think their city is the best and it is pretty common for them to think they were shafted rather than there being little potential for them getting any bigger than they were.
 
Four states, as the far northwest corner of Tennessee would be part of this area as well. Although speaking of Wickliffe, KY, it does beg the question why Paducah somewhat upstream ended up the major river port and not Wickliffe.
It's at the mouth of the Tennessee River, I'd think.
 
It has the crippling disadvantage of being massively vulnerable to floods that even if they don't destroy the city essentially cut it off from contact. That's a huge part of why Cairo is not a major city while St. Louis is guaranteed to be a major city. Too much flood protection is needed that it has no real advantage over Paducah, KY just a bit upstream on the Ohio.
Cairo has another drawback: the New Madrid Fault. The floodwalls and elevated structures needed for flood control would be very vulnerable. There is speculation that Cahokia, with the population of London in 1300 near what is now East St. Louis, may have been abandoned if a major earthquake happened during a major flood. Cahokia was built on mounds, the same type of construction that would be needed to make Cairo a metropolitan area.
 
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