I expect that the Union will undergo massive military reform in the Militia system, weapons, logistics, pretty much everything. Maybe not as Germanic as TL191 but a larger, professional Army and Navy and more strategic planning. Also, any slaves that escape the CSA may be 'lost' in the Union or the Union may provide aid through the Underground Railroad.
 
I expect that the Union will undergo massive military reform in the Militia system, weapons, logistics, pretty much everything. Maybe not as Germanic as TL191 but a larger, professional Army and Navy and more strategic planning. Also, any slaves that escape the CSA may be 'lost' in the Union or the Union may provide aid through the Underground Railroad.

Yes to all. And no, I have no plans to make the Union basically Prussia 2 Electric Boogaloo the way you’d see in TL191; it’ll be a bit of a different dynamic
 
The Congress of Havana
The Congress of Havana

(Wikipedia.us)

The Congress of Havana was a peace conference held in Havana, Spanish Cuba, between April 17 and July 28, 1863, to end the War of Confederate Independence. The parties at Havana were the United States, the breakaway Confederate States, the United Kingdom, France, Mexico, and Russia. Russia positioned itself as a supporter of the US side; all other present powers backed the Confederacy.

The Congress concluded with the Treaty of Havana, which granted the Confederate States full recognition and independence. It concluded territorial disputes - the CSA would keep Kentucky, which it held, in return for suspending its claims to Missouri and the breakaway counties of Western Virginia. The United States also gave up the Arizona Territory, formerly the southern half of New Mexico territory, and the Indian Territory, in return for a 40 year concession within the Port of New Orleans, allowing unfettered trade along the Mississippi for the North and potential access to the Pacific by the Confederacy. The treaty also guaranteed free navigation of the Chesapeake Bay by both powers. France and Mexico earned recognition of Emperor Maximilian I and Mexico’s status as a protectorate; for this reason, the Congress of Havana became known as the “burial ground of the Monroe Doctrine.” The UK and Russia also settled boundary disputes with Alaska and Canada, while Britain settled a minor dispute with Mexico over the border with Honduras.

The treaty was unpopular in both the Union, where it was viewed as a national humiliation imposed by foreign powers - France in particular earned strong American ire - while many in the Confederacy were irate that despite earning independence they effectively gave up sovereignty over their territorial waters, were denied territory in Missouri and Western Virginia they felt they were owed as victors in the conflict and, most importantly, that no war reparations of any kind had been granted to them despite considerable damage in Virginia, New Orleans, and across the West. Nevertheless, Secretary of State Judah Benjamin - a signatory of the treaty - assured the Confederate Senate there would be no better deal, and in November of 1863 they signed the treaty. The United States Senate narrowly passed the Treaty after acrimonious debate, 27-21, with all Democrats in favor and about half of the Republican-Unionist coalition, after intervention in its favor by President Abraham Lincoln and signatory Secretary of State William Seward.
 
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Speech by Thad Stevens
“...and yes, perhaps, our position was unsustainable. Yes, perhaps, this great Union could not face Britain at sea and The combined armies of the rebels, Mexico and France on land. Yes, perhaps, our industry could not survive facing a furious boycott of Europe’s Powers. But how do we call ourselves sovereign when parasites of the Old World combine with the monsters of the New, around a table, to draw our borders for us, little more than children sketching on a map? How do we say we are a proud nation when we surrender our right to self-determination? When we surrender our doctrines at the first gunboat to appear on the horizon? Are we not better than the diplomacy of the bullet? We will suffer grandly this humiliation. I blame not the President nor Secretary Seward, nor do I blame the rebels - I blame all of us, for our collective cowardice in the face of slave power. The Union has not been preserved, evil has not been banished - and we are all at fault.”

- Thaddeus Stevens, Speech to the House of Representatives regarding the Treaty of Havana under consideration in the Senate, November 7, 1863
 
Davis: The Father of a Nation
“...the results of the 1863 elections were positive for the Davis administration, in that they maintained their substantial majority in the Confederate House and maintained 15 friendly Senators. The Confederacy’s lack of formal political parties, viewed by the public as a strength, led to a personality politics instead, and in this sense Davis was found lacking. The unpopularity of his administration’s impotence in domestic affairs and perceived overreach was tempered by jubilation at the ongoing Congress of Havana and then the unanimous passage of the subsequent Treaty.

Still, 1863 marked a waning point in Davis’s political fortunes. It was Lee who was feted as the champion of the South, not he; and his clashes with hostile Governors for the remaining four years of his single term would define his domestic program. The Victorious Confederacy had been hard-hit by war, indebted to foreign militaries and banks alike, and needed nation building. In short, they needed a George Washington and had a Robert Lee; they needed a Thomas Jefferson, and had Jefferson Davis instead.”

- Davis: The Father of a Nation (1974, University of Virginia Press)
 
Diary of Abraham Lincoln
“My failure is complete, and is mine to bear. It was in me the Union entrusted her integrity, and I who failed to uphold it. This chapter of our great experiment is at a close - what comes next, we are yet to discover.”

- Diary of Abraham Lincoln
 
I have really liked it so far! I'm a fan of surviving Second Mexican Empire timelines and yours is great. Your short updates provide clear and detailed overview of the situations across different countries and are a quick, enjoying read. Keep them coming!
 
I have really liked it so far! I'm a fan of surviving Second Mexican Empire timelines and yours is great. Your short updates provide clear and detailed overview of the situations across different countries and are a quick, enjoying read. Keep them coming!

Thank you! Glad you’re enjoying it.
 
Part II: Redrawing the Map
Part II: Redrawing the Map
...if the 1848 revolutions was the mortal wound to the Concert of Europe, then the Unification Wars were the death and burial...”

- Belle Époque: The Golden Age of Western Europe
 
The Cleavage of America
“...lost on no-one that Davis was an ineffectual a peacetime President as he was a wartime one. He had no foundational vision for the new nation other than slave power; where slave power demanded inaction by the central government in Richmond, it was inactive, and where slave power demanded action, it was active. Davis oscillated between aggressive stances towards state governors - there was nobody he despised more than rival Zebulon Vance of North Carolina, who was sincere in his belief in individual and state’s rights - and shrugging off concerns that faced his indebted nation. There would be no Monroe Doctrine under Davis, for they owed the Confederacy to the Three Friends of France, Mexico and Britain; a farming country, there were few to none thoughts of a tariff, making revenue hard to come by, especially with substantial war debt. The efforts of nation building were haphazard and interested Davis’s grandiosity little. A Calhounian at heart, he blew off the concerns of his reformed Whig Vice President Stephens and left the running of the government entirely to his Cabinet secretaries. In the hands of a capable Postmaster such as John H Reagan, that was of no concern; elsewhere in Richmond, the Congress found itself adrift and ossified, and the departments myopic as the guns of war were silenced...”

- The Cleavage of America (Heidelberg University 2011)
 
“...lost on no-one that Davis was an ineffectual a peacetime President as he was a wartime one. He had no foundational vision for the new nation other than slave power; where slave power demanded inaction by the central government in Richmond, it was inactive, and where slave power demanded action, it was active. Davis oscillated between aggressive stances towards state governors - there was nobody he despised more than rival Zebulon Vance of North Carolina, who was sincere in his belief in individual and state’s rights - and shrugging off concerns that faced his indebted nation. There would be no Monroe Doctrine under Davis, for they owed the Confederacy to the Three Friends of France, Mexico and Britain; a farming country, there were few to none thoughts of a tariff, making revenue hard to come by, especially with substantial war debt. The efforts of nation building were haphazard and interested Davis’s grandiosity little. A Calhounian at heart, he blew off the concerns of his reformed Whig Vice President Stephens and left the running of the government entirely to his Cabinet secretaries. In the hands of a capable Postmaster such as John H Reagan, that was of no concern; elsewhere in Richmond, the Congress found itself adrift and ossified, and the departments myopic as the guns of war were silenced...”

- The Cleavage of America (Heidelberg University 2011)
A real confederation, run in complete autopilot
 
Maximilian of Mexico
“...Maximilian did everything he could to reinvent Mexico in the shape of a European state. This both troubled and encouraged his conservative supporters, but the dawn of the Habsburg era was one of new public works, of an enlarged legislature, and of immigration from Europe; though Porfirio Diaz and his diehards remained in the remote Sierra Madres, the fervor for the Liberals shrank in the face of Maximilian coopting some of their agenda...”

- Maximilian of Mexico
 
“...Maximilian did everything he could to reinvent Mexico in the shape of a European state. This both troubled and encouraged his conservative supporters, but the dawn of the Habsburg era was one of new public works, of an enlarged legislature, and of immigration from Europe; though Porfirio Diaz and his diehards remained in the remote Sierra Madres, the fervor for the Liberals shrank in the face of Maximilian coopting some of their agenda...”

- Maximilian of Mexico
Hope that end well for him...
 
Lincoln: A Portrait of the 16th President
“...in later years - including in this very book - Lincoln’s legacy has been re-evaluated. The Man Who Lost the South, as he was known for decades after declining to be re-nominated for the Presidency, was to many a budding tyrant done in only by his haplessness; but Lincoln, historians who rehabilitated him have argued, was dealt a poor hand and played it as best he could. And though it pained him to watch Ulysses Grant go down in defeat to Horatio Seymour in 1864, Lincoln always seemed at peace with his Presidency...”

- Lincoln: A Portrait of the 16th President
 
I'm hoping Lincoln has a happy ending. TL-191 sort of had one, so I hope the same happens here
He did funded/legitimated the socialist in 191 and later on might have got a rehabilitaltion like this one after all say and done, specially the awful hand he got in TL-191 and here.
 
Hoping to see more on Maximilian in the future. btw, what sources are you using for info on the Mexican Empire? I've read isolated snippets here and there, and recently read Maximilian and Carlota: Europe's Last Empire in Mexico, and what I've read makes it seem (at least to me) that Maximilian was more than a little resentful of having to rely on French arms to keep himself in power. Any plans on showing the friction between Max and the French in future posts?
 
Hoping to see more on Maximilian in the future. btw, what sources are you using for info on the Mexican Empire? I've read isolated snippets here and there, and recently read Maximilian and Carlota: Europe's Last Empire in Mexico, and what I've read makes it seem (at least to me) that Maximilian was more than a little resentful of having to rely on French arms to keep himself in power. Any plans on showing the friction between Max and the French in future posts?

My source is mostly whatever I can find online; with Juarez’s death so early in the war, though, his reliance on French arms is diminished.
 
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