British Armoured Cruisers at the Battle of Jutland

Speaking of cruisers that shouldn’t have been at Jutland, why was Frauenlob operating with the HSF? Top speed of 21 knots, 19th century vintage, and predictably sunk with most its crew.
 
Speaking of cruisers that shouldn’t have been at Jutland, why was Frauenlob operating with the HSF? Top speed of 21 knots, 19th century vintage, and predictably sunk with most its crew.

Because of a lack of decent cruisers really. The Germans had 9 light cruisers available at Jutland. And that's it. The rest of their ships were either unavailable (keeping an eye on the Russians or undergoing repairs/Maintenance) or had been sunk. So to use an older lass like Frauenlob was purely because they simply had no other ships to call upon.
 
At the Battle of Jutland the British had 8 armoured cruisers as part of the Grand Fleet. My question is how much use were they? Reading through some of the basic details it seems like half of them didn't really become engaged whilst the other half was sunk. I'm looking at a possible timeline were the British fleet is somewhat rejigged but the changes to it require more manpower, paying off the armoured cruisers seems like one possible source of extra warm bodies.
If you want the best possible performance from an armoured cruiser at Jutland.....

HMS Good Hope is selected instead of HMS Hermes in 1913 for trials as the first experimental seaplane carrier in the Royal Navy, come Jutland she joins the fleet with 6 Short Type 184 and 4 Sopwith Baby float planes having lost her stern mast, both 9.2" mounts and 4 upper rear 6" guns to make room for the large rear flying off and float plan recover deck aft of the funnels as well as the smaller forward take off deck helped by her large size and 23Kn speed.
 
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Driftless

Donor
^^^ Might the planes have had a better opportunity of locating ships of the HSF before and during the fights? With the developing haze (fog and smoke), could the planes have seen the ships better from above than spotting at sea level? Or were those condititons too late in the day to matter?
 
^^^ Might the planes have had a better opportunity of locating ships of the HSF before and during the fights? With the developing haze (fog and smoke), could the planes have seen the ships better from above than spotting at sea level? Or were those condititons too late in the day to matter?
I think just having a larger ships means more aircraft and therefore the ability to keep at least a few up for the entire time and increase the chance that something helps?

I was being quite conservative with 6 and 4 as she is far larger,
14,150 long tons (normal) v HMS Engadine 2,550 long tons (deep)
Length: 533 ft 6 in (162.6 m) (o/a) v 323 ft (98.5 m)
Beam: 71 ft 4 in (21.7 m) v 41 ft (12.5 m)
Speed 23Kn v 21.5Kn

As long as you are willing to remove guns from Good Hope you should fit far more on her than OTL 2+2.
 
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I think just having a larger ships means more aircraft and therefore the ability to keep at least a few up for the entire time and increase the chance that something helps?

I was being quite conservative with 6 and 4 as she is far larger,
14,150 long tons (normal) v HMS Engadine 2,550 long tons (deep)
Length: 533 ft 6 in (162.6 m) (o/a) v 323 ft (98.5 m)
Beam: 71 ft 4 in (21.7 m) v 41 ft (12.5 m)
Speed 23Kn v 21.5Kn

As long as you are willing to remove guns from Good Hope you should fit far more on her than OTL 2+2.

IIRC, in his book on British Aircraft Carriers, Friedman does say that conversion of the remaining Drake class into carriers was an option.
 
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