Andrew Boyd's Create a Company Challenge

Great. Here's my addition:

Hong Kong Biotechnica

Make of that what you will.
Challenge Accepted :)

Hong Kong Biotechnica

Established: January 10, 1975
Headquarters: Central, Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong
Employees: 6,614
Industries: Medicines, vaccines, antibiotics and medicaments, prothesis and abionic implants, medical equipment, personal protective equipment

Divisions:
- HK BioTechnica (active and passive prosthesis)
- HK Biologics (vaccines, antibiotics and active medicines)
- HK Medical Systems (medical equipment manufacturing)
- Forrest Equipment (personal protective equipment)

One of the major second wave of companies founded in Hong Kong during its massive growth in economic power in the 1970s and 1980s, Hong Kong Biotechnica was built to support the massive growth in medical technology first in Hong Kong in the 1970s and then in Mainland China in the 1980s. Establishing operations in the then-being-rebuilt satellite city of Sha Tin, the company began the manufacturing of HK Medical hospital equipment in 1976, having spent a fortune importing equipment from Japan, the United Kingdom and United States to make sure they could maintain extremely high quality control standards. Starting with simple equipment such as ventilators, the company's business swelled particularly after the construction of the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sha Tin, which opened in 1984. The company's alliances with Toshiba in Japan and then with Commonwealth Electric in Australia made rapid advancement of the electronic components in its equipment possible, and by the late 1980s the company was one of Hong Kong's major exporters of medical equipment, both abroad and to mainland China.

During the 1970s and 1980s growth periods the company played little role in Hong Kong's politics, but company founders Yun Lai and Alexander Yeung were both bitterly opposed to the idea of China taking over Hong Kong, in one particularly famous case Yeung walked out of a meeting with then Governor of Hong Kong Murray MacLehose after saying "Beijing could no more coexist with Hong Kong than fire could coexist with water". While Lai was known to have softened his positions over the years, Yeung held absolutely firm in his beliefs. Despite this, the company was one of the largest foreign sources of medical equipment for China in the 1980s, and the company proudly supported reform efforts in Beijing, only to have those efforts dashed completely by the events in Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989. In a perhaps-troublesome twist of fate, Lai and Yeung had a meeting scheduled with Governor David Wilson, in which Yeung loudly roared to the Governor "This is why Beijing is never to be trusted! Never! They have turned on everyone they have ever sought to work with, and you think they will not turn on you?!" When Britain publicly held to their agreement with Beijing on June 25, 1989 and Li Peng made his public call for China to take back Hong Kong three days later, both Lai and Yeung and their families were among the nearly 250,000 people who fled Hong Kong in the space of two weeks. While the Hong Kong Crisis of 1989-90 did eventually result in the objective sought by the company's founders (and their relationship with China was almost irreparably damaged), the two resolved to be stiff supporters of Hong Kong's pro-democracy movements, a situation that remained for many years in the future.

The loss of the Chinese market and the massive losses from the Crisis ultimately resulted in the company being re-organized in 1992, and as Hong Kong's recovery continued, the company shifted its manufacturing out to Tai Po and Tsung Kwan O, and many of its operations were shifted to other nations, including its electronics manufacturing to Malaysia and many of its simpler production elements to India and Sri Lanka. By the mid-1990s, the company had acquired small Australian equipment manufacturer Forrest Equipment and began expanding its production of medical-grade personal protective equipment, while by 2000 having expanding its offerings in terms of medical equipment all the way up to diagnostic imaging machines and radiology equipment. The connections with Forrest resulted in the company beginning the making of medical prosthesis in Hong Kong in 2002, and their equipment was soon renowned across Asia for its quality and durability. As Hong Kong's status changed in the 2000s to less of a colony and more of a self-governing state connected to the United Kingdom - and China began shifting back towards a pro-Western direction - the company began to once again expand its manufacturing operations in Hong Kong.

After the monstrous 2003 SARS epidemic hit Hong Kong (and Lai's son was among those who suffered from it), the company announced the development of biosciences division, to be known as HK Biologics. The company was quick to get far with the development of vaccines and antibiotics, the company being the key developer of vaccines against a number of viral diseases, being particularly successful due to the use of multiple supercomputers to run simulations about disease mutation and transmission - data that would prove invaulable in dealing with multiple epidemics around the world in the 2010s and 2020s. The company's leadership passed from its founders to their children in 2008-09, but the focus on advanced technology and top-grade products remained, and one of Lai and Yeung's final major involvements with the company in 2011 was the opening of the (somewhat audaciously named, but nobody seemed to care) Republic Biological Sciences Institute on Sharp Island, which would become one of the foremost Medical Research Laboratories in the world by 2025.
 
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Challenge Accepted :)

Hong Kong Biotechnica

Established: January 10, 1975
Headquarters: Central, Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong
Divisions:
- HK BioTechnica (active and passive prosthesis)
- HK Biologics (vaccines, antibiotics and active medicines)
- HK Medical Systems (medical equipment manufacturing)
- Forrest Equipment (personal protective equipment)

One of the major second wave of companies founded in Hong Kong during its massive growth in economic power in the 1970s and 1980s, Hong Kong Biotechnica was built to support the massive growth in medical technology first in Hong Kong in the 1970s and then in Mainland China in the 1980s. Establishing operations in the then-being-rebuilt satellite city of Sha Tin, the company began the manufacturing of HK Medical hospital equipment in 1976, having spent a fortune importing equipment from Japan, the United Kingdom and United States to make sure they could maintain extremely high quality control standards. Starting with simple equipment such as ventilators, the company's business swelled particularly after the construction of the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sha Tin, which opened in 1984. The company's alliances with Toshiba in Japan and then with Commonwealth Electric in Australia made rapid advancement of the electronic components in its equipment possible, and by the late 1980s the company was one of Hong Kong's major exporters of medical equipment, both abroad and to mainland China.

During the 1970s and 1980s growth periods the company played little role in Hong Kong's politics, but company founders Yun Lai and Alexander Yeung were both bitterly opposed to the idea of China taking over Hong Kong, in one particularly famous case Yeung walked out of a meeting with then Governor of Hong Kong Murray MacLehose after saying "Beijing could no more coexist with Hong Kong than fire could coexist with water". While Lai was known to have softened his positions over the years, Yeung held absolutely firm in his beliefs. Despite this, the company was one of the largest foreign sources of medical equipment for China in the 1980s, and the company proudly supported reform efforts in Beijing, only to have those efforts dashed completely by the events in Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989. In a perhaps-troublesome twist of fate, Lai and Yeung had a meeting scheduled with Governor David Wilson, in which Yeung loudly roared to the Governor "This is why Beijing is never to be trusted! Never! They have turned on everyone they have ever sought to work with, and you think they will not turn on you?!" When Britain publicly held to their agreement with Beijing on June 25, 1989 and Li Peng made his public call for China to take back Hong Kong three days later, both Lai and Yeung and their families were among the nearly 250,000 people who fled Hong Kong in the space of two weeks. While the Hong Kong Crisis of 1989-90 did eventually result in the objective sought by the company's founders (and their relationship with China was almost irreparably damaged), the two resolved to be stiff supporters of Hong Kong's pro-democracy movements, a situation that remained for many years in the future.

The loss of the Chinese market and the massive losses from the Crisis ultimately resulted in the company being re-organized in 1992, and as Hong Kong's recovery continued, the company shifted its manufacturing out to Tai Po and Tsung Kwan O, and many of its operations were shifted to other nations, including its electronics manufacturing to Malaysia and many of its simpler production elements to India and Sri Lanka. By the mid-1990s, the company had acquired small Australian equipment manufacturer Forrest Equipment and began expanding its production of medical-grade personal protective equipment, while by 2000 having expanding its offerings in terms of medical equipment all the way up to diagnostic imaging machines and radiology equipment. The connections with Forrest resulted in the company beginning the making of medical prosthesis in Hong Kong in 2002, and their equipment was soon renowned across Asia for its quality and durability. As Hong Kong's status changed in the 2000s to less of a colony and more of a self-governing state connected to the United Kingdom - and China began shifting back towards a pro-Western direction - the company began to once again expand its manufacturing operations in Hong Kong.

After the monstrous 2003 SARS epidemic hit Hong Kong (and Lai's son was among those who suffered from it), the company announced the development of biosciences division, to be known as HK Biologics. The company was quick to get far with the development of vaccines and antibiotics, the company being the key developer of vaccines against a number of viral diseases, being particularly successful due to the use of multiple supercomputers to run simulations about disease mutation and transmission - data that would prove invaulable in dealing with multiple epidemics around the world in the 2010s and 2020s. The company's leadership passed from its founders to their children in 2008-09, but the focus on advanced technology and top-grade products remained, and one of Lai and Yeung's final major involvements with the company in 2011 was the opening of the (somewhat audaciously named, but nobody seemed to care) Republic Biological Sciences Institute on Sharp Island, which would become one of the foremost Medical Research Laboratories in the world by 2025.
Fantastic. Absolutely fantastic. Thank you for this
 
@TheMann
Any other ideas? I love yours.
I think I have a good one, again from repurposing an existing company from the TheMann Universe.... 🙂

Pacific Truck and Engineering

Established: August 6, 1947
Headquarters: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Divisions:
- Pacific Trucks (trucks and commercial vehicles)
- Pacific Transportation Vehicles (trailers and trailer components)
- Pacific Kubota (large diesel engines)
- British Columbia Brake Systems (air brake systems)
- British Columbia Car Works (railroad cars)
- Pacific Components (vehicle parts)

Pacific Truck and Trailer was born out of a desire for a little friendly competition in the market for heavy equipment in Western Canada, as a market dominated by the Hayes Manufacturing Company and Robinson Heavy Industries was still regardless as enough of a market for four skilled Hayes mechanical engineers - Mac Billingsley, Vic Barclay, Joshua Callingbull and Claude Thick - to get into themselves, creating a rival truck-building company in Vancouver in the summer of 1947. It was at the time a good idea, as Hayes was struggling at times with inflexibility and Robinson was in the midst of a massive diversification effort. Pacific's first trucks were sold to logging firms, a lucrative market in the post-war era in Canada, and the company's operations grew steadily, particularly as the Pacific trucks soon gained a repute for being nearly invincible in their element. By the early 1960s, demand for the products had grown to such a degree that the company spent over $10 million on a new plant in North Vancouver and expanded their operations, selling trucks not only in North America but also in Australia, New Zealand, many portions of South East Asia and South Africa.

Having swelled their business, the quartet took the company public in 1966, using the money gathered from it to develop many of their own parts lines, while continuing to buy engines from International Harvester and Allison. The company's trailer division got a major boost when the company earned a highly-lucrative contract from Canadian National Railways in 1976 for a fleet of trailers meant for the company's intermodal divisions, money that allowed the company to build a completely new plant for the production of truck trailers on Annacis Island in New Westminster, British Columbia. As with the trucks before it, the trailers proved to be remarkably durable even by the standards Pacific strove for. They had hardly gotten that market established when the company scored another new and massive job, supplying over 700 new hopper cars for the British Columbia Railway's massive Tumbler Ridge coal mines projects. In doing this, the company built its third new plant in British Columbia in just over 15 years, the British Columbia Car Works in Pitt Meadows, to build the cars.

By the mid-1980s, Pacific Trucks' 1980s-era problems with the supply of Detroit Diesel and Caterpillar engines for its trucks was growing acute, particularly as both GM (Detroit Diesel's parent) and Caterpillar were gunning for Pacific's market. When GM denied Pacific access to the new Detroit Diesel Series 60 engines in 1985, Pacific made the move to begin designing engines on their own, but within a year and a half had a partner in Japanese construction equipment builder Kubota, creating the Pacific Kubota division. Having never entered into the field of this size on their own Kubota sought to have Pacific develop engines using their technology, aiming to capitalize on the Canadian firm's legendary reputation for reliability and Durability. The result was the Pacific P21 and its new Pacific Kubota V124 engine, introduced in March 1989. Unsurprisingly, the engines were made in British Columbia, this time establishing a new truck plant was built in Richmond and converting the North Vancouver plant to the building of engines.

The Pacific Kubota engine partnership ended up going places for both firms. Able to use Pacific's expertise the Japanese company's product range grew in the 1990s, while Pacific's engine supply was forever assured. The success of the project saw Pacific's volume rise dramatically, particularly after the company began selling its trucks in Britain in 1992 and the rest of Europe shortly thereafter. (The British launch featured the tagline "Built to conquer the Canadian Rockies, here to conquer Snowdonia and the Scottish Highlands.") Despite the growth in sales, Pacific never has wavered from its philosophy of trucks, trailers, equipment and components meant to withstand the harshest possible conditions, and while this has compromises in terms of cost and fuel efficiency, the company's products have proven themselves to be nigh-on indestructible in their element, and they came to be sold in markets as far afield as Norway, Japan, Russia, Iceland and India to customers who needed the ability to get whatever they needed delivered to where it needed to go, no matter what that took. The Pacific Kubota engines proved to have much higher volumes, selling not only in Pacific trucks but also in several other smaller firms' products, including DAF, Scania and Kenworth, the latter being the biggest user of Pacific Kubota engines outside of the company itself.

While Pacific Kubota engines are produced in many places around the world, the entirety of the truck, trailer and rail car production and most of the components production remains in British Columbia's Lower Mainland, and Pacific is by some margin the largest industrial employer in the region, its operations in ten separate plants and design and engineering laboratories in Vancouver, North Vancouver, New Westminster, Langley, Richmond and Delta employ over 16,000 workers.
 
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The Northern Company

Established: March 16, 1964
Headquarters: Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada
Divisions:
- Northern Marine (ocean transport)
- Northern Logistics (road and rail operations)
- Nunavut Mining Corporation (mines)
- Inuit Artists (artist co-ops)

One of the many companies created as a result of settlement rights developed as a result of the Treaty of Orillia, The Northern Company, which is almost entirely owned by First Nations members (a common theme among many of the companies created by First Nations groups in Canada is that they tend to remain almost entirely owned by the bands they were created for, for good or bad) was a creation meant to drive the economic development of the Northwest Territories, a job it was entirely successful at, even if in ways not entirely expected by those who created it in the spring of 1964.

At the time, the Treaty's rights to self-government (within democratic limits), culture, language and land rights had been long established, but the companies and moves by their creators and owners had created huge numbers of successful businesses and co-ops among the members of Canada's First Nations, particularly in Ontario (where the First Nations-owned companies were forestry juggernauts and major players in the mining business after World War II) and Quebec (where the vast First Nations involvement in the James Bay Project created an entire class of new skilled tradesmen and managers), but the Inuit of the North, pushed by government policies and economic realities to give up their once-nomadic lifestyles, ended up as a small, impoverished minority in their own regions. This was seen by all involved as completely unacceptable, and as the Inuit bands became signatories to the Treaty of Orillia in the 1950s, the Treaty's responsibilities meant that Ottawa and regional authorities now had a responsibility to change that. They got more than a little driving force as the first boarding high schools of the region, established in the post-World War II era, saw their first graduates return home having seen and learned about the civil rights growth further south and a desire to make things better in their own communities. This combination produced a powerful political push, which ultimately manifested itself in the creation of Nunavut in 1999. But long before then, The Northern Company was seen as a driver for change.

The company began its efforts with mining and resource gathering, but by the 1970s it had also developed a lucrative - and culturally beneficial - trade in Inuit art and artifacts, which found eager buyers in the rest of Canada, which drove many new Inuit artists into those fields. As numerous mines opened in the Northwest Territories in the 1970s, Inuit workers followed the lead of their Quebecois counterparts and became tradesmen in sizable numbers, and The Northern Company leapt into the field as well, gaining a major concession in 1980 to develop a deep-water port at Bathurst Inlet, which became a bigger project when the proposed ice road became an all-weather road, and then Canadian Pacific Railway built north from Yellowknife to it, opening its Bathurst Inlet branch in 1987. The money from the smaller mining projects allowed the company to get into buying vessels for goods transportation and eventually trucks as well, as the all-weather roads built in the Northwest Territories in the 1980s allowed such projects.

The development of massive iron ore mines on the Melville Peninsula and Baffin Island in the 1980s and 1990s saw The Northern Company work with Canadian National Railways on the development of an intermodal system for delivering goods to Naujaat by rail, then across the Foxe Sound by vessel and from Kinngait to Iqaluit by road, a system that led to massive reductions in costs for goods in the region. (The company also developed a similar system to deliver goods from Naujaat to Igoolik, and from Bathurst Inlet to numerous communities in Western Nunavut.) This provided much better logistics for the mines and massive reductions in the cost of living for local residents, as well as a windfall for the company, and the company moved rapidly to turn this windfall into other benefits.

Over the 1990s and onward, the "New Inuit" movements among many in the region had its own impacts, one of the chief of which was improving their environments. As incomes grew and costs of living fell across the region, many of the social problems - alcoholism and drug abuse, domestic violence and violent behaviour among youths and younger adults - became less common. Nearly every smaller town in Northern Canada built their own greenhouses for growing produce in the 1990s and 2000s, the metal-sided slab homes that dominated the region began to disappear in favor of much larger steel-framed homes with intricate stone and wood exteriors and intricate rock gardens in their yards, the region's number of "town markets" of everything from food to clothing to electronics began to swell as cheaper import prices allowed goods once unattainable to become available. This also led to the region's own population taking advantage of newly-acquired skills and pushing forth ever-better infrastructure in the region - roads became paved on heavily-used ones, wind turbines and solar cells began to supplement diesel generators for electric power, smaller-scale desalinization became common and sewage treatment plants began to become common in larger communities. CN extended its mining lines to Igoolik and Kugaaruk, in the former's case by building a massive bridge to connect Igoolik Island to the Melville Peninsula, and the 2000s saw the arrival of fiber-optic communications networks, in the case of mainland ones built alongside the railroads and roads of the region.

The Northern Company's transportation capabilities swelled with all of this, buying vessels primarily from shipbuilders in British Columbia and New Brunswick at first, but later on the Bonavista Shipyards in Newfoundland became a favored builder for the company's vessels. Ro-Ro vessels joined the company's cargo liners in the 1990s, and the highway to Igoolik, completed in 2003, resulted in intrepid road-trippers being able to travel all the way to Iqaluit by road. The company's largest-ever Ro-Pax ferry, MV Aurora Vision, was delivered to the company in May 2007, designed to provide service from the Northern Ontario town of Attawapiskat to Kinngait, Hall Beach and Igoolik, even in the tough waters of Hudson Bay. As the growth of the truck traffic grew the company began to search out ways to reduce traffic congestion on Nunavut Highway 3 from Kinngait to Iqaluit, as well as testing out a twelve-kilometre section of electric highway on the route in 2012. The electric highway experiment ended up being unsuccessful, but the company's second crack at the development of lower-emission trucks, through a fleet of Northern NT1 trucks - Nikola One drivetrains built into modified Pacific P26 chassis - began with the hauling of double-trailer movements in 2017. Experiments with road trains proved successful and the use of third-trailer trucks began by the company in July 2018.

As of 2020, The Northern Company operates thirteen vessels, three Ro-pax ferries and ten cargo ferries, with the routes from Kinngait to Naujaat, Hall Beach and Igoolik being the busiest, while Bathurst Inlet's port and the company's ships supply all of Nunavut's respective communities on a regular basis. The company's trucking operations for its road operations to supply mines, forestry facilities, fish processing plants and communities of the north have grown to such an esteem that few other companies rival it, though numerous independent trucks have in recent times entered the business. The company also owns its own railroad cars and locomotives for carrying goods into the north, generally operating on Canadian National Railway lines from Winnipeg to Igoolik and Naujaat. The mining operations remain a source of income for the company even as dozens of other firms, large and small, also are involved in the task of mining the vast resources of Northern Canada.

Virtually the company's entire workforce is Inuit, and the company's wealth and employment of nearly 3500 people in the North is a source of pride for its employees, and the company is a dedicated supporter of Canadian businesses - trucks and trailers from Kenworth, Pacific and Robinson, locomotives from EMD, rail cars from National Steel Car or Procor, vessels made at Versatile Pacific, Atlantic Canada Shipbuilders and Bonavista Shipyards.
 
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Hasbro-Marvel(From the thread NAHMT. Resuming TBD)
Hasbro-Marvel are, as of 2000, one of the largest media conglomerates in the world. Founded in 1992 as a merger of Hasbro and Marvel, the company has since expanded via acquiring video game studios such as EA in 1994 and Humongous Entertainment in 1996. the company has major assets in toys, comics and games and have licensed their characters into other mediums including TV and film.
 
Hasbro-Marvel(From the thread NAHMT. Resuming TBD)
Hasbro-Marvel are, as of 2000, one of the largest media conglomerates in the world. Founded in 1992 as a merger of Hasbro and Marvel, the company has since expanded via acquiring video game studios such as EA in 1994 and Humongous Entertainment in 1996. the company has major assets in toys, comics and games and have licensed their characters into other mediums including TV and film.
Ah that one, not bad
 
Robinson Heavy Industries

Established: September 4, 1882
Headquarters: London, Ontario, Canada

Divisions:
- Robinson Vehicle Manufacturing (vehicles)
-- Robinson Diesel (diesel engines)
-- D. Napier and Sons (diesel and turbo-compound engines, turbochargers and intercoolers)
-- Massey-Ferguson (agricultural machinery)
-- Santerre (construction equipment)
-- Western Star (diesel trucks)
-- Orion Bus Industries (buses and transit vehicles)
-- American LaFrance (firefighting vehicles)
-- Triumph Motorcycles (motorcycles, 40% stake)
- Robinson Mechanics (industrial machinery, pumps, gearboxes, production equipment)
-- Landmark Services (grain elevator installation and operation)
- Robinson Metalworks (metal tools, auto parts, metal products)
-- Ontario Tool Works (hand tools, mechanics tools)
- Robinson Materials (composite products, metallurgy, rare earths mining, coatings and platings, metallic paints)
-- Kennedy Mining Corporation (rare earths mining)
-- J.R. Robertson Company (fiberglass bodies and components)
-- TechBlue Environmental (environmental remediation)
- Robinson Components (parts and supplies)

One of the largest non-government owned firms in Canada with a workforce in Canada of nearly 70,000, Robinson grew steadily from humble beginnings as a manufacturer of steam-powered agricultural equipment on the east side of London, Ontario, growing thanks in large part to both a vision towards sales of many different products to serve the agricultural industries and a fortuitous meeting in England.

That meeting in London in May 1908 was where Robinson's co-founder and namesake Henry Robinson met diesel engine creator Rudolf Diesel, whose own finances were struggling and whom was not impressed with many aspects of the nationalism sweeping Europe at the time. While the principles of diesel engines were by then known and diesel engines were being built in North America, Robinson felt that Diesel's work had much to be advanced on, and he offered the chance for Diesel to come to Canada to improve the designs if Robinson could use any designs he came up with. Diesel did just this, and the Robinson diesel engines began to be made, with Diesel's development of the use of vegetable oils as motor fuels being widely developed by Robinson, who agricultural machinery was already known to be of high quality. While both sides in World War I used diesel engines, Diesel was much said to be much impressed with Canada's work ethics and increasing desires to make all of its myriad of citizens be part of its nation, and is said to have compared Canada after the Battle of Vimy Ridge to Germany's unification, writing to Robinson in August 1917 "Your nation has now truly been born." Robinson became a major player in the diesel engines world during the War thanks to its production of engines for many sorts of military equipment (including the first tanks built by the Canadian Army) and Diesel after the war returned to Canada to advance the science of his own creating, becoming a Canadian citizen in 1925 and dying in London a fabulously rich man in 1937.

Between the wars Robinson all but eliminated the steam-powered product lines and advanced its engineering corps, as well as creating its own lines of trucks and commercial vehicles and developing diesel-powered railroad switching locomotives and construction equipment. Robinson's massive growth between the wars led to Canada giving them responsibility for many important aspects of the war effort in World War II, from building heavy engineering vehicles and armored personnel carriers to being the Canadian licensee for the then-revolutionary Napier Deltic diesel engine, which was by Robinson's engineers developed into the turbo-compound Deltic after the war, along with the Napier company becoming part of the Robinson empire in 1947. The Deltic began to be used in Robinson products in 1949, with Deltics driving electric motors for everything from farm equipment to fire trucks to railroad locomotives. The company's advancement of vegetable oil-powered products also paid major dividends, as the "Flex Fuel" systems, developed by Diesel himself during the inter-war period, were developed into virtually all of Robinson's later products.

The company's huge growth into industrial machinery after the war - driven by a need to supply high-quality equipment to Canada's industrial sector and also to customers abroad - was similarly successful, with the company starting with the making of simpler products such as stamping machinery and lathes and advancing to much more complex machines over time, with that division being highly lucrative in the 1950s and 1960s, even as the agricultural products division expanded its reach into the forestry and mining industries. Robinson's Santerre construction equipment division also proved highly lucrative in the 1950s and 1960s (helped along by the massive public projects of post-war Canada), and the company's material divisions, bought or developed to support the agricultural, industrial machinery and construction divisions, became major players in their own right. The company's purchase of the Canadian Locomotive Company got them into the railroad business on their own, and the Kingston CLC plant made Robinson a player in the transportation world though the building of subway cars for the Montreal and Toronto subway systems and the UAC-developed Turbotrain, which began service with Canadian National Railways in 1966.

When the White Motor Company declared bankruptcy in the United States in 1977, Robinson took the opportunity to buy the Western Star division and enter the business of making large trucks on their own, joining the ranks of truck builders in North America and using its own Robinson engines in Western Star trucks and developing a deal with Nissan Diesel to expand the Western Star lineup beyond the larger trucks that Western Star had been making for decades, using Nissan chassis and drivetrains with Robinson engines, sold as Western Star products. A move by Kenneth Robinson to support John Booth's effort to re-organize the Triumph Motorcycles company in the UK let to the company having a major equity stake in Triumph, and the expansion of other vehicle industries led to the acquisition of debt-ridden Orion Bus Industries in 1992, allowing the company to become a major bus builder almost overnight - a situation again helped by the availability of Robinson's own diesel engines and Robinson HybriDrive system, which was developed for the Orion VI bus, which entered production in 1995.

As the company's growth expanded post-World War II, Robinson was one of the firms that had a close relationship with a major financial institution - in Robinson's case it was with the Bank of Montreal - and over time the banks tended to push major industrial firms to do a lot of business with other firms connected to the bank. This system, similar in many ways to Japan's massive keiretsu (though not nearly as vertically connected as the keiretsu), came under criticism by the Stanfield and Mulroney governments in the 1980s for favoring larger firms and stiffling corporate innovation. The massive growth of many newcomers to Canada's corporate ranks in the 1970s onwards proved that while much of this criticism was hyperbole, it still stung harshly, and it led in many cases to the banks pushing their allied companies to be supporters of many promising newcomers to the worlds they inhabited - and indeed in many ways the growth of the Robinson empire to include Western Star, Orion and Triumph (among others) was examples of this. But nowhere was this more seen than in the 1997 takeover of Massey Ferguson by Robinson.

Massey Ferguson had been struggling since the late 1970s, and the successful back-door lobbying by soon-to-be-infamous business baron Conrad Black to get the Canadian government to recapitalize Massey Ferguson, which was done in 1980, ended up in a major uproar. In the years since then, Massey Ferguson had been a target of multiple rounds of asset-stripping barons, held back primarily by the fact that Alberta's Wildrose Natural Resources Fund was Massey Ferguson's largest shareholder. By the mid-1990s, however, the firm's sizable losses had been swallowed for long enough, and the Fund went searching for a merger partner. Effectively leaned into it by the Bank of Montreal, Robinson made a staggering takeover offer for the firm in June 1996, complete with a detailed plan to sell off many of its existing agricultural businesses in order so as to not be in a near-monopoly position in the market. In a strange twist of fate, Robinson was able to sell its agricultural equipment divisions to Japanese maker Kubota - who was pushed into it by Western Star rival Pacific Truck and Engineering, who was a partner with Kubota in the larger truck markets. These moves made headlines across the country but were for the most part approved of by Canadians, and Ottawa approved of the merger of Massey Ferguson and Robinson on March 11, 1997, with the merger becoming official on August 1, 1997. Kubota's takeover of the former Robinson Agricultural Machinery company became official on October 1, 1997, and within a year this massive shift in Canada's industrials was to be matched by the merger of the Royal Bank of Canada with French banking behemoth Societe Generale, marking major shifts in the world of Canadian banking just like one of its largest industrials.
 
Here is my spin a museum that @TheMann created for his Milk and Honey TL. Since he allowed me to borrow his railroad ideas. With a few ideas @Lucas suggested peppered in.

The Rail Museum of the Americas
Headquartered in the former CNJ terminal at Jersey City, NJ; this museum was founded as the age of steam was coming to its end in 1962, and has since then become a major tourist attraction across the country due to its sheer quantity and quality. Due to its sheer size, the museum is split up into special exhibits that are occupied by most of the equipment on the basis of various characteristics.

Our journey starts once you get into the parking lot from Freedom Way in Jersey City. As soon as you have entered the main entrance on the West End, we get a little appetizer. Said appetizer being the museum's smaller exhibits such as signals that frame the area, and pantographs/artwork of days gone by. In the center of all this is Milwaukee Road SD80MAC #6904, which famous saved several firefighters in Montana during 2012 wildfires [1]. After a while there, the patrons can then move on to the Grand Hall.

Along the way there, visitors pass between two 4-8-4s - Union Pacific FEF-2 #826 and New York Central Niagara #6016, both of which have 'steam' being let out and workable whistles. On the other side is a magnificent collection of individual locomotives all facing a turntable with the oldest engine, Union Pacific 4-4-0 #737, perpetually spinning around on said turntable. This roundhouse is also one that includes the following two special exhibits:

Supermen of Steam
This exhibit, located on the south side of the Grand Hall's Turntable, is dedicated to biggest and best of steam railroading.
- Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe 2900 Class 4-8-4 #2917 [2]
- Delaware and Hudson J class 4-6-6-4 #1526
- Chesapeake & Ohio M-1 Class 2-C1+2-C1-B Turbine #500
- Union Pacific "Big Boy" 4-8-8-4 #4010
- Pennsylvania Railroad S2 Class 6-8-6 #6200 [3]
- Norfolk & Western Y6b Class 2-8-8-2 #2174
- Canadian National Railways Class V-1-a 4-8-2+2-8-4 Garratt #6011 [4]
- Pennsylvania Railroad Q2 Class 4-4-6-4 #6183

Friends From Around The World
This portion is dedicated to the many world contributions to the museum's collection.
- Japanese National Railways D51 Class 2-8-2 #362
- SNCF 240P Class 4-8-0 #12
- New South Wales Government Railways AD60 Garratt 4-8-4+4-8-4 #6039
- British Railways / LNER A3 Class 4-6-2 #2578 "Bayardo" [5]
- British Railways / Southern Railway 'Merchant Navy' Class 4-6-2 #35012 "United States Lines"
- British Railways 9F Class 2-10-0 #92232
- China Railways QJ Class 2-10-2 #6585
- Victorian Railways S class #S305 and #S308

Sandwiched in between the two special exhibits are the rest of the Grand Hall's locomotives, which are:
- Central of New Jersey M-3a Class 2-8-2 #930
- Rock Island ALCO FA #154
- Monon ALCO C628 #408
- Reading K1-sa Class 2-10-2 #3006 [6]
- Southern Pacific Krauss-Maffei ML 4000 diesel-hydraulic #9002
- General Motors EMD GM10B electric #1976 (the first one built)
- Canadian National Railways U-2-g Class 4-8-4 #6227
- Southern Pacific SP-3 Class 4-10-2 #5042
- Erie S-2 Class 2-8-4 #3340
- Illinois Central 2-8-0 #638: Famously operated by Casey Jones during most of his tenure as an IC engineer.

Once you leave the Great Hall, you pass through two of the first modern locomotives ever built: Union Pacific Veranda Turbine #67 and British Rail Type 55 "Deltic" #55013 "The Black Watch". One the other side is the special exhibit building, where the two exhibits are separated by the last three Alco Century 855s. On the north side is:

Power To Get You Home
This exhibit, located on the north side of the Grand Hall, is dedicated to the wide variety of motive power on commuter trains. All of the individual locomotives have period-appropriate commuter cars attached to them.
- New Jersey Transit General Electric U34CH #4174
- Pennsylvania MP54 EMUs #413, #427, #437, #415, #453, and #542
- Metra EMD F40C #610
- Metrolinx EMD F59PH #852
- Boston & Albany D-1a Class 4-6-6T #402
- Reading Q-1d Class 2-6-4T #381
- MBTA EMD GP40MC #1139
- GO Transit GP40TC #506
- Caltrain EMD F40PH-2-CAT #916 'California'

On the south side of the Special Exhibit Hall is:
Americans Around the World
Unlike the international exhibit back in the Grand Hall turntable area, this exhibit consists entirely of locomotives built in America for use across the world.
- South African Railways 15CA Class 4-8-2 #2054 "Cheeta"
- Indian Railways WP Class 4-6-2 #7205
- SNCF BB 1280 Class #E.10
- CIE 181 Class Bo-Bo #188
- RENFE 313 Class Co-Co #3717-04
- New Zealand Railways Q Class 4-6-2 #345
- Dona Teresa Christina Railway 2-10-4 #312
- FS 735 Class 2-8-0 #735-025

Finally, you pass though the Exhibit Hall to the Train Shed. Situated in the former CNJ Terminal shed, this area hosts a total of 20 train consists and trainsets, with the locomotive-hauled trains including cars from Amtrak's heritage fleet and various private donors. These trains have been cosmetically restored both inside and out so that the visitors can enter the trains and get a first hand idea fo what riding said trains was like. As one enters the platforms from either side, you get a ticket featuring the logo of the train you're about to enter and the railroad that ran it, and the adjacent platforms feature boards detailing their respective histories that are visible from inside the trains.
- Pennsylvania Railroad K4s Class 4-6-2 #3768: Rebuilt with its streamlining and a replica of its 12-wheel tender, with a train carrying the insignia for the Broadway Limited. [7]
- Southern Pacific GS-4 Class 4-8-4 #4449: One of the best loved SP engines, with a train carrying the insignia for the Coast Daylight.
- Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe FP45s #91, #94 and #95: Train behind carries the insignia for the Super Chief, as this consist was the last eastbound passenger train the ATSF ran before finally joining Amtrak in 1996. [8]
- Delaware and Hudson Alco PA4s #17 and #18: Train behind carries the insignia for the Laurentian.
- British Railways Class 254 'Intercity 125' DMU set #254 028
- Great Northern F7s #362A, #359B, #360C and #353D: Train behind has two GN dome coaches and a GN 'Great Dome' car, with the insignia for the Empire Builder.
- JR West 0 Series Shinkansen EMU #26-1007
- New York Central J-3a Class 4-6-4 #5455: Rebuilt with its streamlining and a train carrying the insignia for the 20th Century Limited.
- Pennsylvania Railroad 'Metroliner' EMUs #800, #801, #815, #818, #850 and #883 (#800 and #801 are the pair of prototypes that reached 164 mph in testing in 1968)
- VIA Rail LRC-2 #6915 and LRC-3 #6923: Each engine is on one end of the consist, with eight LRC coaches sandwiched between the two.
- SNCF TGV Sud-Est EMU set #16: Was bought over to Texas in order to text Amtrak Texas' then-new line from FWD to San Antonio. [9]
- Pennsylvania Railroad GG1 #4800: Train features insignia for the Congressional.
- GM / Budd / Boston and Maine "Flying Yankee" DMU trainset
- Rio Grande Krauss-Maffei ML4000 #4001, EMD F7 #5764, and Alco FPB-4 #2055: Train behind features insignia for the California Zephyr. [10]
- Illinois Central EMD E8As #4020 and #4032: Train behind features insignia for the Panama Limited. [11]
- Western Railway of Alabama 4-6-2 #190: Train behind features insignia for the original Southern/A&WP/L&N run of the Crescent.
- Amtrak HS-E5R "Acela-Shinkansen" #2002 [12]
- Atlantic Coast Line EMC #500: Train behind carries an insignia for the Champion.
- Baltimore and Ohio N-1 Class 4-4-4-4 #5600 "George H. Emerson": Train behind features the insignia for the Royal Blue [13].
- Amtrak EMD AEM-7AC #901: Train behind features insignia for the Metroliner.
- Canadian Pacific T1-b "Selkirk" Class 2-10-4 #5927: Train behind features the insignia for The Canadian [14].

As you finally leave the Train Shed, you get to finally wind down in the CNJ Terminal. If ones goes down to the building's basement, one can take a look at the impressive variety of toy trains on display that range in age from early tinplate trains, to early Lionel and American Flyer, and modern icons like MTH.

The real stars of this exhibit however, are the HO Scales models in the 28,000-square-foot American Miniature Wonderland. This exhibit is a wonderful assortment of trains that ran America's regions from the 1930s into the 1960s, and consists of:
- The Big City: The heyday of urban rail travel in the late 1930s, with trains ranging in nature from expresses to commuter trains to long freights serving the heavy industry in the region. The PRR's Broadway Limited and GG1s are featured as M1 Mountains and I1 Decapods hustle freights, the NYC's 20th Century Limited rolls along behind streamlined Hudsons while Mohawks handle the famous Pacemaker, the New Haven's passenger trains are featured behind their famous I-5 Hudsons, the B&M's Flying Yankee is featured alongside smaller steam-powered services behind Pacifics, the Erie's Berkshires and Lackawanna's 4-8-4 "Poconos" haul freight away from the docks, and the Reading's Crusader passes the legendary T-1 4-8-4s and other big-fireboxed steamers hauling heavy freight. You can even see Batman chasing after crooks from time to time. Lastly, we are also treated to the 2ft gauge workings of the North Central Railroad in the backwoods of Northwestern Maine [15].
- The Great Big West: We move on to the mid to late 1940s, when WWII was mostly over, but evidence of both it and the looming Cold War are still evident. In this scene of mountains and deserts, we are treated to a wide variety of heavy trains. Among the passenger trains are the Great Northern's Empire Builder, the Western Pacific handling the California Zephyr, the Santa Fe's Super Chief, and the Canadian Pacific's The Canadian. Additionally, freight trains are hauled by such legends as Canadian National's Garratts, Northern Pacific's Yellowstones, Milwaukee Road's electrics, Union Pacific Big Boys and Challenger, and Southern Pacific Cab Forwards and 4-10-2s. A bit further southwest, we see the Rio Grande's narrow gauge Mikados shuttling natural gas from the fields of northern New Mexico and southern Colorado to the waiting big engines. The other railroads see some freight action too, with ATSF's mighty ten-coupled steamers handling freight and troop trains alike and Great Northern's own Mallets also appearing.
- The Peaceful Plains: The picturesque 1950s era Midwest/Great Plains area is shown at its best in terms of railroading. Steam and diesel hauled freights behind Nickel Plate Berkshires, Grand Trunk Western's famous Northerns, the first diesels from both the Wabash and Monon, and a Baldwin Ten-Wheeler on a generic shortline add some excitement to the quiet towns. Further west, the industrial centers of the Midwest enjoy the company of CB&Q Zephyrs, Rock Island freights, Missouri Pacific's blue-and-silver streamliners, Chicago Great Western 2-10-4s living out their final days, the Katy's quaint branch lines, the Chicago NorthWestern shuttling Union Pacific trains to the Windy City, Illinois Central's impressive collage of passenger diesels and steam freights, the GM&O's unique diesels, and Kansas City Southern's fast freight trains. This part of the layout dedicates itself to lush forests, vast open grain and orchard fields, and the first major use of diesels on American railroads.
- From Coal to The Coast: This final portion of the massive layout details the railroads of the country's southeast during the later-day transition era of the late 1950s and early 1960s. We start in the coal country of the Virginias, Maryland, & Kentucky where we see the final days of steam on the N&W, C&O, L&N, Virginian, and Western Maryland as 2-8-4s and Mallets alike storm through the mountains with their heavy coal trains. Also in these mountains, we see the L&N passenger services bound for Atlanta from the Midwest. Further south, we are treated to the sun-drenched beaches with cheerful families, bikini-clad cuties, and buff surfers. Along these pristine beaches, we follow the steamliners of the ACL, SCL, and Florida East Coast railroads as they shuttle these people on their vacations. Last but far from least, the Southern gets in on the action with its iconic Crescent passenger train, fast freights, and special steam excursions double-headed by Ps-4 Pacific #1398 and Ms-1 Mikado #4501.

Every once in a while, the museum will hold special events where certain special models are featured on the layout. Common examples include running HO Scale replicas of the original models used in filming Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends' model series - which was done to celebrate the individual character's 60th Anniversary on October 18, 2006. Other, more realistic examples include having Grand Trunk Western #5629 "Walter E. Disney" having been painted in Mickey Mouse's black and red with a tannish smokebox and the Mickey Mouse logo instead of the GTW logo, hauling a series of Pullman coaches that are painted to represent iconic Disney characters like Goofy, Jiminy Cricket, Scrooge McDuck, Maleficent, Mrs. Brisby, and The Genie [16].

In addition to the layout, the main terminal building features the obligatory gift shop, which features plenty of artifacts from . What really attracts people to the original terminal building is the restaurant inside - known as The Terminal. This place is considered by any several steps above the average museum cafeteria, and has evolved into a restaurant in its own right, with visits from such iconic celebrity chefs as Gordon Ramsey, Guy Fieri, and Binging With Babish creator Andrew Rea - the latter even had some of his more popular recipes placed on its menu.

[1] TheMann originally had Conrail 4117 do the honors, but since my TL butterflies Conrail, this diesel has the honor instead - complete with the same backstory as his idea.
[2] TheMann originally had 2-10-4 #5006 preserved here. However, I decided on a 2900 type so we could have something a bit bigger - in my TL, 5006 is instead preserved at the former ATSF station for Galesburg, IL.
[3] Preserved ITTL because the PRR crews at Crestline requested it, and the PRR eventually sold it to what evolved into the ARM in 1953.
[4] TheMann created the idea of CN running Garratts. In my TL, Garratts were also built and run by the Southern.
[5] Plenty of other LNER A3s survive ITTL, at least four in total.
[6] TheMann originally had T-1 #2119 as the Reading engine at the museum, but I decided that since the Reading Rambler steamers will stick around ITTL, I'd have a new class of engine instead.
[7] TheMann originally had the infamous S1 Duplex at the front, but I decided that ITTL, that will go to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.
[8] An additional condition of them joining Amtrak would be that they used ATSF tracks for the entirety of the Super Chief's Chicago - LA run.
[9] At first, this trainset was repainted into the silver and bright red with yellow trim of Amtrak Texas, but later regained its orange and cream livery later on.
[10] The latter locomotive is actually a former Canadian National engine.
[11] I was going to keep TheMann's idea of the NYC E8As with the Empire State Express, but I felt the IC could use some love.
[12] Ran the first ever Acela services in 1992.
[13] I thought of replacing the lone N-1 with a P7d pulling the Cincinnatian, but decided that TheMann's idea was a bit better.
[14] I was going to have the engine be Royal Hudson #2839, but the spectacle of a ten-coupled passenger engine felt more appealing to me.
[15] Based on the ideas of @NHBL.
[16] The backstory for this is that my TL has Walt quit smoking after he blows up his parents' badly ventilated house by forgetting to put out a cigar. In turn, this leads to him appointing Don Bluth and Roy E. Disney as the duumvirate in charge of the animation studio. One of the things Walt also does because he's still alive is help to preserve the 5629 at the IRM in Union, which is where nameplates reading "Walter E. Disney" were placed on both sides of the engine's smokebox. The cigar disaster does mean that his mother Flora Call's tragic death is butterflied.

OOC: Having both foreign contributions and American built engines for other countries may seem redundant, but I felt there should be a museum with a dedicated exhibit for American exports.
 
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Atlantic Shipbuilders

Established: May 11, 1964
Headquarters: Bedford, Nova Scotia, Canada

Divisions:
- Maritimes Division
-- Nova Scotia Shipbuilders (Bedford, Nova Scotia)
-- Saint John Shipbuilding (Saint John, New Brunswick)
-- Clarke-Wilkinson Vesselworks (Shediac, New Brunswick)
- Great Lakes Division
-- Ontario Marine (Whitby, Ontario)
-- Georgian Bay Boatbuilders (Owen Sound, Ontario)
- Pacific Division
-- Versatile Pacific Shipbuilders (Vancouver, British Columbia)
-- Todd Pacific Shipbuilders (Seattle, British Columbia)
- American Division
-- Bath Iron Works (Bath, Maine, USA)
-- Boston Atlantic Shipbuilding (Quincy, Massachusetts, USA)
- Commonwealth Division
-- Swan Hunter (Wallsend, England, UK)
-- Harland and Wolff (Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK)
-- Scott Lithgow (Greenock, Scotland, UK)
-- Sandock Austal (Durban, South Africa)

The largest shipbuilding corporation in the world not based in Asia, Atlantic Shipbuilders can trace its history back to numerous smaller yards and companies, in Canada, the United States and Great Britain, which all ended up under the same banner in large part thanks to a single woman, Lady Katherine Brockhouse, who was a driving force behind the building of an empire from a collection of smaller firms, beginning with taking the companies her father bequeathed to her in his will upon his death in 1964 and then dramatically expanding them, frequently by making allies among many of the smaller firms struggling to compete with the might of Asian shipbuilders starting in the 1960s. Lady Brockhouse, who led the firm from her 1964 inheritance until she retired as a result of breast cancer-related health issues in 2002, was a strong believer in the idea that North American builders could best gain back market share through the construction of the best vessels possible and the expansion of technology, both in construction and in the vessels themselves.

Starting with Ontario Marine and Nova Scotia Shipbuilders in 1964, the empire began as Canada, flush with nationalistic tendencies in the wake of Expo 67, led expansions of its merchant marine fleet, led by the Crown Corporations' shipping divisions as well as those of Canadian Pacific Lines and Canada Steamship Lines, providing plenty of business to these two yards and plenty of chances to prove the capabilities of their vessels. The first supertankers ever built in Canada came from the Nova Scotia Shipbuilders' yards in Bedford, Nova Scotia, and proved strong and capable vessels, one of the vessels lasting an incredible 31 years in service before being retired in 1998. One of the first foreign takeovers came as a result of this, namely the struggling (though incredibly famous) Harland and Wolff Shipyard in Belfast, which became a partner of the Atlantic Shipbuilders in 1971 and completely owned by the Canadian firm in 1977. Indeed the nationalization and sell off a number of years later of British Shipbuilders proved highly beneficial for Lady Brockhouse's efforts, as Swan Hunter and Scott Lithgow were early 1980s acquisitions. Harland and Wolff was able to competitively produce some huge vessels in the 1970s, and their success, as well as the firm's success in heavy engineering, made its reputation with both the British government and European vessel owners and buyers.

Even as the British acquisitions continued, the Canadian shipbuilding industry almost entirely coalesced around the Canadian Shipbuilding Corporation and Atlantic Shipbuilders, with only a handful of exceptions such as the Newfoundland Shipbuilding yard at Bonavista. Clarke-Wilkinson became part of the company after it was bought out of bankruptcy in 1970, and many smaller vessels were assigned there, a situation repeated when Georgian Bay Boatbuilders was sold to Atlantic in 1979, freeing more space at the massive Ontario Marine Whitby yards. The sale of Saint John Shipbuilding to Atlantic by the powerful Irving family in 1986 was one of the final acts of this consolidation in Atlantic Canada, just over four years before the failing Todd Pacific Shipyards became part of the company in 1990, followed by Vancouver's Versatile Pacific Shipyards the following year.

The company's proposed buying of General Dynamics' Bath Iron Works and Boston Atlantic Shipbuilding subsidiaries in 1995 ended up becoming a rather large controversy, though one in which the company bore no fault - Washington, zealously guarding its defense contractors, demanded that Atlantic move its operations to the United States as a condition for approval of the deal. Atlantic, more than likely influenced by the fact the majority of its business up until then came from Canadian and British parastatals, wasn't willing to do this and publicly said so, causing a stir when Washington claimed that the company wouldn't lose business because of their dominant positions in Canada and Britain - to which the likes of BAE Systems and Canadian Shipbuilding Corporation pointed out that if Atlantic was willing to give up the business, they would gladly take it off of their hands. In the end Ottawa brokered a deal wherein Atlantic would agree to a number of important conditions with regards to the yards' continued operations and General Dynamics pointed out that even if Atlantic was to close the yards, there were other yards that could do whatever work the American government needed done. The conditions agreed to, Bath Iron Works and Boston Atlantic Shipbuilding both became divisions of the company in June 1996, followed in February 1997 by the Sandock Austal shipyard in Durban, South Africa, sold to the company at the end of apartheid.

Beyond the consolidation of many smaller firms into one bigger whole, Atlantic Shipbuilders introduced to many of the firms many new technological aspects, both in terms of the vessels themselves and methods on construction. This was most famously seen on the NS Northern Light, an experimental nuclear-powered 15,750 TEU container vessel built by the firm which entered service with Canada Steamship Lines in May 2002, which had been assembled from pieces at four separate shipyards and assembled at Nova Scotia Shipbuilders, which at the time was the largest vessel of any kind ever built in a Canadian Shipyard. The Northern Light was a stylish, capable vessel whose twin CANDU 15A-type nuclear reactors and turbo-electric propulsion gave the massive vessel a service speed of 26.25 knots - considerably faster than any rival - and while initial construction costs were high, the quality of the vessel and its efficiency resulted in the vessel being a standout among the CSL fleet.

Beyond expanding technology in terms of nuclear-powered vessels, the company also developed ground-breaking designs in turbine-electric propulsion, the use of inverted bow and X-bow design, building vessel hull components out of hydroformed aluminum to reduce the number of joints for water to leak through and licensing the Incat-developed ferry design that resulted in the construction of the Grand Cayman-class fast patrol vessels for the Royal Canadian Navy, all six examples of which were built at the Clarke-Wilkinson and Georgian Bay yards. The company's experiences and technical development centered on the Bedford Hydrodynamic Research Center in Nova Scotia, which was a major design laboratory for the company and for naval architecture in general.

As of 2020, the company employs 18,500 workers in Canada, nearly 12,000 in the UK, 8,850 in the United States and 3,200 in South Africa, producing, overhauling or substantially repairing over a thousand vessels every year and doing thousands of smaller repairs, as well as huge amounts of design work. The 2000s saw the company begin building megayachts and larger pleasure vessels, as well as the restoration of historic steel vessels.
 
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Anik Power Systems

Established: September 26, 1990
Headquarters: Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada

What does a company that spent many years developing a way to harness solar power from space - and ultimately successfully doing so - have to do with a massive nuclear power station? In the end, just about everything, as it was a desire by the governments of both Canada and the province of Nova Scotia to build a genesis of engineering and power know-how in the maritimes that made it possible, and in turn ultimately made Industrial Cape Breton a symbol of past and future meeting each other in ways the creators of the businesses never imagined.

The story began with the Dominion Steel and Coal Company announcing in 1967 that it was planning to close down the famed Sydney Steel Works, the center of the city's industrial heart for nearly a century. That move led to the plant rapidly being nationalized by the Nova Scotia government, which turned it into the Sydney Steel Corporation. Having saved the plant didn't save its fortunes, but fate did that instead - the 1973 energy crisis led to an investigation into what the best way to reduce the maritimes' dependency on oil-fueled power would be, and the construction of the Lingan Nuclear Generating Station by Nova Scotia Power, announced in 1974 the building of the nuclear power plant at Sydney, fully aware of the massive costs involved, but with local residents entirely in support of the idea, a rarity for North America's nuclear industry even then. But what truly aced it was the fact that the station's contractors, Atomic Energy of Canada and PCL Construction, chose to almost-exclusively use Nova Scotia Steel in the plant's building, a move that made for nearly a decade of work for Sydney Steel....and a desire by Nova Scotia Power to create a home-grown industry training electrical engineers, using Lingan as their starting point. By the time Lingan's Unit 1 was connected to the grid in 1981, the province's efforts were bearing fruit. Lingan ended up being the largest single expenditure in the history of the province, costing nearly $1.5 Billion to build, but it's massive power output - 1700 MW of electricity from its three units, enough for the entire province just a few years earlier - was a major boon to local industrial and economic concerns as well as local residents, and by the late 1980s the plant's operators were almost entirely locals.

One of these, Dr. Hunter Roberts, was one of the veterans of the project and one of the senior operators at Lingan, but he was also a keen observer and had been a reader and technology watcher for decades, all the way back to the first demonstrations by William Brown in the 1960s, flying toy helicopters using power beamed to it by microwave. (He also says Isaac Asimov's story Reason, which featured such a concept, also inspired him.) Dr. Roberts believed that such systems could make power from the sun far more viable than what was possible on Earth, even as Canada's power grid capacity, already way more than enough for the nation's own needs thanks to hydroelectric dams in Quebec, Ontario, British Columbia and Manitoba and nuclear reactors across the country, reached its zenith in the 1980s and 1990s and steadily reduced the use of fossil fuel-fired facilities. Roberts with this in mind founded Anik Power Systems in 1990, searching for investors to develop the theory further. He found them not long after in the powerful Neikan family, investors in international heavy industry since World War II and among Canada's richest families. At the center of this was Alexandre Neikan, an avid science buff himself and at the time of his family's involvement with Anik beginning was a graduate student at Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, studying at the famed Computer Science Research Laboratories at Queens, developers of technology since its founding by Dr. Alan Turing in the early 1950s.

Neikan and Roberts worked on the ground-breaking "Power From The Stars" study, which was publicly released in April 1994, which stated that the idea was indeed technically feasible, though the current costs of space launches made the cost prohibitive, even as the company developed its first designs for such stations. In February 1995, the company was invited by the Government of South Africa to develop a design for a station to be located in the Great Karoo desert southwest of Beaufort West in the Western Cape province, a commission that allowed the company to develop detailed plans of what such a massive power station rectenna could look like. Despite this, the company's raison d'etre was a bit of a stretch at the time, as it was widely understood that the huge costs of space launches had to come far down before the idea was even close to viable.

But the development of the Commonwealth's Skylon single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) spacecraft design in the 2000s changed all that. The Skylon reduced the cost of space launching the components of such a power station to just over $150/kg to orbit, a cost that made the project still expensive but now possibly viable. As the Skylon entered service in 2014, Anik was quick to contact the Canadian Space Agency and United Kingdom Space Authority about the use of Skylon to lift components to space. Having gotten the go-ahead for this, the company spent 2015 gathering investors for a full-scale development of the idea, approval from the Government of South Africa to build the mighty Beaufort West rectenna, (which would be nearly 5500 metres in diameter) and the approval of various bodies for the facility's operations. That completed, the plant's rectenna began construction in February 2016, and the first pieces of the design were sent to space on Skylon in September 2017. The facility on Earth was completed a month before the satellite's assembly was completed in November 2018, and on March 22, 2019, Cyril Ramaphosa, the President of South Africa, switched on the facility, which in a matter of hours was delivering 1826 MW of electrical power to the South African grid, making the design real.

Within a month of the Beaufort West plant's operation Anik was negotiating out plans for facilities in Canada, Australia, Israel, Italy, India and the United States, numbers which grew as the Skylon fleet grew and rivals to it were built as well. The first Canadian Space-based solar power plant would be the second one built, opened by SaskPower at Dalmeny, Saskatchewan, in February 2023, and by the end of the 2020s the company had built nine such plants and was well on the way to creating a completely new kind of way of generating electric power, even as numerous companies in the power, technology and infrastructure businesses - General Electric, Toshiba, Schneider Electric, Siemens, Ferranti Beaulieu, Bechtel - all swung rapidly into the business, even as Anik rapidly consolidated its suppliers base around Canadian suppliers and ultimately got Ferranti Beaulieu to become part of its efforts.

Outside of the space-based power projects, the company's development of the use of microwave technology for both power transmission and communications became a major source of revenue, information and pride for the company, and an Anik-developed communications system was used by SSI Micro and Qiniq for the development of broadband internet across Nunavut, the Northwest Territories and the Yukon (and eventually the company began operations with its system in Alaska, Greenland and Iceland), and the company's microwave power transmission systems began to be used in many smaller communities across Canada.

The company's huge projects made Sydney have a second new economic base, and in the 1980s these began to slowly merge, as Sydney Steel began to rebuild its facilities for much better efficiency, as well as producing many new alloys and products. This led to many of the mill's older buildings being rebuilt or given new faces to suit the new identity, and the massive development of office campuses and labs for Anik's (and its supporters') projects led to the development of what became the "Steel Future" style of design that would be seen across Eastern Canada and the United States in the 1990s to 2020s. Ultimately, environmental remediation efforts resulted in the complete rebuild of the mill, created what looked more like a metal-making laboratory than what at one point was the largest steel mill on the planet. This wasn't by accident, of course - the old facility was an environmental mess, a mess that ultimately was completely cleaned up. As Anik grew to nearly 3,000 employees in Sydney in the 2010s, the wealth of these newcomers and the power plant's staff, along with the (nearly all unionized) mill workers, led to Sydney becoming one of the richest small cities in Canada by 2019 and swelling dramatically in size, with Sydney's population bottoming out in the mid-1980s and then growing back again, with nearly 160,000 people calling the area home as of 2020.
 
Just for a bit of information (since I am making my companies all co-exist in the TheMann Universe), this is the populations of Canada's provinces and territories of 2017:

Canada Total: 85,195,634

By Province/Territory:

Ontario: 25,068,410
- Toronto: 11,357,220 [1,2]
- Ottawa: 3,188,157 [3]
- Hamilton: 2,792,540 [2]
- London: 1,665,178
- Kitchener-Waterloo-Cambridge: 1,374,280 [2]
- Windsor: 823,168
- Sudbury: 609,780 [4]
- North Bay: 548,224 [4]
- Kingston: 392,056
- St. Catharines: 355,177 [2]
- Thunder Bay: 260,225
- Sault Ste. Marie: 174,462 [4]

Quebec: 16,415,580
- Montreal: 8,676,215 [5]
- Quebec City: 2,417,227
- Gatineau: 1,552,214 [3]
- Sherbrooke: 880,074
- Saguenay: 650,287
- Trois-Rivieres: 432,180

British Columbia: 13,822,288
- Vancouver: 6,315,262 [6]
- Seattle: 4,516,109 [7]
- Victoria: 912,344
- Kelowna: 446,165
- Namaimo-Courtenay-Comox: 324,228
- Prince George: 253,806
- Kamloops: 220,181

Alberta: 11,415,224
- Calgary: 4,506,228
- Edmonton: 4,274,802
- Lethbridge: 581,755
- Fort McMurray: 502,241
- Red Deer: 317,658
- Medicine Hat: 205,286

Jamaica: 4,468,128
- Kingston: 2,574,229 [8]
- Montego Bay: 490,289
- Negril: 252,716

Manitoba: 2,946,185
- Winnipeg: 2,354,170
- Brandon: 105,214

Nova Scotia: 2,617,809
- Halifax: 1,620,407
- Sydney: 168,386
- Truro: 67,229

Saskatchewan: 1,819,116
- Saskatoon: 626,758
- Regina: 595,111

Trinidad and Tobago: 1,805,226
- Port of Spain: 373,219
- Chagaunas: 294,103
- San Fernando: 278,764
- Arima: 221,155

Caribbean Islands: 1,410,704
- St. George's: 97,422
- Castries: 84,598
- Basseterre: 71,190
- St. John's: 58,456
- Roseau: 52,643

New Brunswick: 1,277,323
- Saint John: 323,644
- Moncton: 306,118
- Fredericton: 187,788

Newfoundland and Labrador: 890,376
- St. John's: 402,062
- Corner Brook: 35,220

Bahamas: 565,923
- Nassau: 335,397

Barbados: 310,442
- Bridgetown: 204,265

Prince Edward Island: 201,156
- Charlottetown: 98,245

Northwest Territories: 77,755
- Yellowknife: 32,410

Nunavut: 74,510
- Iqaluit: 22,175

Yukon: 57,179
- Whitehorse: 40,044

[1] Toronto includes the Greater Toronto Area out to Oakville, Newtonville and Barrie, including Mississauga, Markham, Vaughan, Brampton, Pickering and Oshawa
[2] Part of the "Golden Horseshoe" of Southern Ontario, stretching the complete length of north shore of the Niagara Peninsula and around the west end of Lake Ontario and through the Greater Toronto Area, stretching from Niagara Falls to Newtonville, as well as west to include Brantford, Guelph and Kitchener-Waterloo-Cambridge
[3] Ottawa-Gatineau includes the entire National Capital Region, including Gatineau, Kanata, Nepean, Stittsville, Orleans, Richmond, Metcalfe, Munster, Carleton Place, Rockland and the Outaouais Regions, though technically roughly 35% of the population of the region is in Quebec as a result
[4] Part of the "Northern Belt" communities of Northern Ontario, stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Temiscaming and Mattawa
[5] Includes Laval, Longueuil and the North Shore and South Shore regions, though over three-quarters of this population lives on the Island of Montreal, Jesus, Bizard and Perrot
[6] Includes the City of Vancouver as well as Richmond, Burnaby, North and West Vancouver, Coquitlam, Surrey, Delta, New Westminster and regions out to Maple Ridge, Langley, Point Roberts, Lions Bay and Bowen Island
[7] Includes the City of Seattle as well as Tacoma, Olympia, Everett, Bellevue, Redmond, Renton, Bremerton, Kent, Auburn, Edmonds, Port Orchard and Silverdale
[8] Includes the cities of Kingston and New Kingston as well as Spanish Town, Portmore, Stony Hill, Bull Bay and Gordon Town, easily the largest city of the Canadian Carribbean
 
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