An Age of Miracles Continues: The Empire of Rhomania

What is the state of Iskander's troops going to war after war? Did not work so well for the original Alexander. Is he pushing his troops past the breaking point with war after war. When will the troops rebel and say no more, we want to go home.
 
Wow, Hungary seriously got dismembered. So the only pieces remaining are Hungary proper, Austria (with Germans camping inside), and Croatia (semi-independent)? Now Wallachia is even bigger than Romania in OTL, is it going to play a more active part in European politics?
 
Wow, Hungary seriously got dismembered. So the only pieces remaining are Hungary proper, Austria (with Germans camping inside), and Croatia (semi-independent)? Now Wallachia is even bigger than Romania in OTL, is it going to play a more active part in European politics?
I think it's surrounded by either countries much bigger and stronger, or Imperial 'vassals'. It may be able and willing to occasionally assist the Rhomanians locally in case of trouble either because of similar interests or the longstanding, if not alliance, at the very least friendship, but can't project forces too far.
On the subject, hey, @Basileus444 a map of from Europe to India at the very least would be extremely helpful. :openedeyewink:
 
I think it's surrounded by either countries much bigger and stronger, or Imperial 'vassals'. It may be able and willing to occasionally assist the Rhomanians locally in case of trouble either because of similar interests or the longstanding, if not alliance, at the very least friendship, but can't project forces too far.
Well I guess having friendly nations economically dependent on the Empire is good enough. B444 what's the public perception of the Romans in Wallachia? They probably worship the dirt Demetrios steps on now.
 

Arrix85

Donor
So another seed is planted. if the war of succession is coming in the 1630s, Andreas and Elisabeth get married around 1620-1621 you get a child which is "half-german" and in the right conditions he may be denied his or her chance of ascending to the throne, so triggering a german intervention. Nice(?).

Good about the consolidation of roman holdings in the Adriatic. Has Anna any heirs?

Other than that, at least for a while there should be peace for Rhomania, I hope they maximize this period of respite.

I've already said it more than once, but the Ottomans are beyond scary. if they should develop also a navy, it's almost game over for the Romans.
 
So another seed is planted. if the war of succession is coming in the 1630s, Andreas and Elisabeth get married around 1620-1621 you get a child which is "half-german" and in the right conditions he may be denied his or her chance of ascending to the throne, so triggering a german intervention. Nice(?).

Good about the consolidation of roman holdings in the Adriatic. Has Anna any heirs?

Other than that, at least for a while there should be peace for Rhomania, I hope they maximize this period of respite.

I've already said it more than once, but the Ottomans are beyond scary. if they should develop also a navy, it's almost game over for the Romans.
I highly doubt that its game over for the Romans, but yeah, even beyond Iskander the Ottomans are going to remain a long term threat for the Romans, assuming that the Ottomans get an average slate of competent rulers. Developing a navy is likely going to come, as the Ottomans become more and more aware of Rome trying to develop colonial interests. Certainly, plundering India would help Ottoman finances for quite a while; OTL Nader Shah's early 18th century invasion of the Mughals gained him so much plunder that he stopped taxing his subjects for 3 years.
 
I seriously feel that the Ottomans are going to have a deeper fall from their "Andreas" apogee, due to just how they are structured. Yes the Azabs make a serious backbone of professionalism in the armed forces but the rest of the system will splinter in a fashion. They are just too big, and if anything the war with Rome showed is their economy is much more brittle. Even with the new crops in southern Mesopotamia.

After Islander I feel there will some serious "time of troubles" where they will look inward on what works best and develop a more.modern run state because they are going to get eclipesed fast me thinks come the 18th C when we start to see the very basics of industry begin in Europe and trickle down to Rome.

That goes without saying what the Indian Elephant in the room will do when the hint of Ottoman weakness wafts over the Vindhya range.

Then again I could have missed the whole barn.
 
The Ottomans haven't had any serious succession crisis. They don't have the deepset legalistic mindset that marks a monarchy as modern. Given the penchant for Muslim Sultans to have harems with shitton of children...
 
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I agree with the sentiment that there will be a massive civil war once Iksander kicks the bucket. Surely his sons and subordinates are building up power bases in all those recently won territories.
 
HanEmpire: The Dowager Queen of Hungary will show up in the next update. As for Andreas-Elizabeth, cousin marriages were quite common amongst European royalty IOTL. Charles II was the result of several uncle-niece marriages in a row. That’s not going to happen.

No, it’s Akoimetoi. They are the newest guard tagma, just formed and commanded by Leo Neokastrites. The name comes from an order of monks, the Sleepless Ones, because they keep up a constant prayer. But I like the name and it’s appropriate for a military unit.

ImperatorAlexander: Would I do such a thing? “Looks innocent”

RogueTraderEnthusiast: It is a good bit of propaganda, especially since anyone descended from Theodora boasts a bloodline significantly closer to Andreas Niketas himself.

Also Andreas doesn’t need to make a marriage in regards to Italy; it’s already been done. His mother is Helena the Younger, daughter of Demetrios II, Emperor of the Romans. His father is Alexios I, Despot of Sicily.

Dominic: I wanted a more balanced world. Too often it seems in TLs that either Europe dominates as IOTL or it’s a minor backwater. I don’t care for either. I might do thematic updates. I also might, if a year is ‘quiet’, have a certain development take place in a field and then take some time describing what has been going on in said field for some time. I do that with astronomy in an upcoming update.

Bmao: Iskandar hasn’t tried to make any contact to open up an anti-Roman alliance. It’d be a difficult task since he’s got a Russia-Georgia-Rhomania-Egypt wall cutting him off from the west. It is possible though and it was a Milanese-Ottoman alliance that caused the Romans such havoc in the Time of Troubles.

Attitudes toward Islam haven’t changed much compared to OTL. There is a pragmatic willingness to ally with Muslim states if interests coincide, but that occurred IOTL (Franco-Ottoman, Anglo-Moroccan). They’re still ‘infidel scum’. Do note that one of Demetrios Sideros’ criticisms of the Hungarians was that they were acting as de facto allies of Iskandar.

Donald Reaver: One advantage Iskandar has over Alexander is that he can rotate soldiers between home and the front, whereas Alexander just had the one army continually marching. Plus the loot amassed from ransacking North India does a really good job of keeping soldiers excited.

JohnSmith: Hungary is now down to Hungary proper, Croatia (starting to act like Hungary in the Dual Monarchy), Austria (filled with Bavarian garrisons), and Presporok/Slovakia (vassal state). Vlachia could play a bigger role now but it’s still greatly overshadowed by its larger neighbors (although Vlachia can now look on Poland as more of an equal than before).

In both Vlachia and Serbia Demetrios II is absolutely adored. There will be more on this later and there will be significant results because of this down the road.

Sir Omega: Yesterday I finished making a map using the same template as the 1600 map with the year 1625. There’ll be some more border adjustments between now and the early 1620s before the lines stabilize.

Arrix85: Anna does have an heir. Some new additions for the family tree who’ll get introductions in 1620.
1) Leo Drakos-son of Anna Drakina, Duchess of Dalmatia and Istria, born 1604.
2) Demetrios Asen-Palaiologos, grandson of Ioanna Drakina and great-grandson of Princess Alexeia, born 1604.
3) Nikephoros Laskaris, son of Anna Drakina, grandson of Princess Theodora, great-grandson of Ioannes VI, last of the Second Komnenid dynasty who was a grandson of Andreas Niketas by legitimate male descent, born 1602.

Duke of Nova Scotia: I think one problem the Ottomans have vis-à-vis the Romans is that they’re less organized and professionalized, so the success of their Empire is more dependent on the skill of the sovereign. A good Emperor is always a boon for the Romans, but even if he’s just mediocre they have a well-organized, fairly meritocratic civil service and army established which can typically at least keep things plugging along provided there aren’t massive disasters and/or the Emperor isn’t a complete imbecile. Iskandar has done some administrative and tax reform to finance the Qizilbash which help a lot but it’s not the same as the Roman civil service and its well-established traditions.

Babyrage: I will point out though that Iskandar is still only in his late 40s (he took the throne in around 1588 but was only twenty at the time). He could quite reasonably stick around for another 20-30 years.
 
I find in most instances with situation's like the Ottomans, that the ugliest trouble tend to come from.within. That is a lot of proud peoples to be under the rule of a Greek descended, Persian acting Turk.
 

Arrix85

Donor
Sorry to bother (the tree taketh, the tree giveth), but I have a question about Theodoros Laskaris. Anna Komnena Laskarina,daughter of Theodora, was born in 1558, and in 1584 (among the children of the triumvirate) was listed as having two children: Micheal and Theodoros. Wouldn't be more likely if this family member born in 1602 was a child of one of this two? if he was a Grandchild of Anna he would be more plausible (in 1602 she would be 44...)?

The "Retcon" would be easy 'cause he could be the son of Michael, which named his son after his late (and beloved) brother.

the Updated tree (as usual you have to download it, the changes from the previous version are relatively minor):

https://db.tt/K4dwXuk7
 
HanEmpire: The Dowager Queen of Hungary will show up in the next update. As for Andreas-Elizabeth, cousin marriages were quite common amongst European royalty IOTL. Charles II was the result of several uncle-niece marriages in a row. That’s not going to happen.

No, it’s Akoimetoi. They are the newest guard tagma, just formed and commanded by Leo Neokastrites. The name comes from an order of monks, the Sleepless Ones, because they keep up a constant prayer. But I like the name and it’s appropriate for a military unit.
Obviously I'm 560 pages late but by the way Akritoi is somewhat problematic. It's Akritas in singular and Akritai or Akrites in the plural form. Akritoi exists as a word but translates to unjudged/not well judged as it derives from a different word.
 
Duke of Nova Scotia: But then everybody can find something to like in him...right...right? Fine then.

Sorry to bother (the tree taketh, the tree giveth), but I have a question about Theodoros Laskaris. Anna Komnena Laskarina,daughter of Theodora, was born in 1558, and in 1584 (among the children of the triumvirate) was listed as having two children: Micheal and Theodoros. Wouldn't be more likely if this family member born in 1602 was a child of one of this two? if he was a Grandchild of Anna he would be more plausible (in 1602 she would be 44...)?

The "Retcon" would be easy 'cause he could be the son of Michael, which named his son after his late (and beloved) brother.

the Updated tree (as usual you have to download it, the changes from the previous version are relatively minor):

https://db.tt/K4dwXuk7
Decided to change things up. The cousin in question is now Alexandros Drakos, grandson of Alexandros, the youngest son of Theodora. Alexandros the Elder, married to Sophia Komnena of Arles, had one son Ioannes, who married Sophia Komnena of Alexandria, who is a younger sister of Despot Demetrios III. Their son is Alexandros the Younger, born 1602.
 
Lol That I do not doubt, it is his questionable sons or relations to follow. Personally I don't mind him, he seems like a real Renaissance Man.

I thought about this while reading notes on Leonardo Devinci and his design for a bridge over the Golden Horn. Outside of the White Palace, what sort of grand buildings have been done around the Empire? Would they have contracted an engineer to build a bridge? I know the Strategon was the heart of the Navy in post classical times, but would it get in the way of ships from the arsenal? Could they build a draw bridge? This is an unbroken line of engineering acumen of the Romans so it makes me think they would have had the know how to.do a project like London Bridge-ish over the horn.

Maybe not though, they used a lot of steel for that, the most the Rhomani would have is stone, brick, wood, and concrete. Really good concrete however, maybe prefab brick/concrete components, and built up. The amateur engineer in my head is thinking of how you could preindustrial build a bridge like that.
 
Any bridge would have to be able to allow capital ships to pass beneath it, which probably means suspension. I don't know if such engineering feat is possible in this era.
 
Lol That I do not doubt, it is his questionable sons or relations to follow. Personally I don't mind him, he seems like a real Renaissance Man.

I thought about this while reading notes on Leonardo Devinci and his design for a bridge over the Golden Horn. Outside of the White Palace, what sort of grand buildings have been done around the Empire?
If I may steal from my far older and smaller Philosopher Emperor back in 2003, some cathedral of Saint Theodore the Stratelate rivaling Hagia Sophia and OTL St Peters in size seems all too logical to find its way to Constantinople for the obviously same reasons. ;) As would several smaller ones all over the empire. Add at least a couple Saint Demetrios, one in Constantinople and one in Smyrna, Saint Andrews. And probably a notable Saint Mamas somewhere in east Asia Minor given the connections of his cult with the Akritai...
 
I feel a Golden Horn bridge is doable, with it being conceptualized in the early 16th C. OTL and the engineering acumen of the Rhomans of TTL, plus they still knew how to make Roman concrete.

I should have mentioned the construction of churches and cathedrals would go without saying, with the ecclesiastical background of the empire, they were always building new churchs and rebuilding old, even in their late years.

I guess I meant more infrastructure, we are now in the mid 17th century. Would there be a proper Canal at the isthmus of Corinth? Grand bridges connecting all the islands of Venezia? Maybe even grand plans for say a Suez Canal? The latter maybe reaching it a bit far, but grand infrastructure investments would be likely. I am just trying to think of any interior Anatolia irrigation programs, or land reclamation that would be monumental in it's effect on food production and quality of life.

Don't get me wrong a beautiful Cathedral is beautiful.
 
I feel a Golden Horn bridge is doable, with it being conceptualized in the early 16th C. OTL and the engineering acumen of the Rhomans of TTL, plus they still knew how to make Roman concrete.

I should have mentioned the construction of churches and cathedrals would go without saying, with the ecclesiastical background of the empire, they were always building new churchs and rebuilding old, even in their late years.

I guess I meant more infrastructure, we are now in the mid 17th century. Would there be a proper Canal at the isthmus of Corinth? Grand bridges connecting all the islands of Venezia? Maybe even grand plans for say a Suez Canal? The latter maybe reaching it a bit far, but grand infrastructure investments would be likely. I am just trying to think of any interior Anatolia irrigation programs, or land reclamation that would be monumental in it's effect on food production and quality of life.

Don't get me wrong a beautiful Cathedral is beautiful.
A Corinth canal is technically feasible but its cost in the early 19th century was estimated at about 40 million gold franks. The hyperpyron stands at 3.8 grams of gold in the ATL (20.5 out of 24 pure gold in a 4.45gr coin) or 13.1 gold franks (and incidentally 0.52 pounds sterling). So a ballpark estimate for the cost of the canal is around 3.05 million hyperpyra. Not back breaking for the empire but neither trivial either.

A Galata bridge... Da Vinci's design doesn't look all that feasible to me. The floating bridges that were the first to fourth bridges in the 19th century seem to me more practical... if they don't affect sailing ship movement.
 
1616
Duke of Nova Scotia: Only specific major construction projects I can think of are the White Palace, the Herakleian Walls, the Smyrna palace built by Demetrios Megas, and the Muses’ Theater of Smyrna. New Constantinople and Pyrgos are created pretty much from scratch in the east. But there definitely have been lots of churches, monasteries, nunneries, along with secular buildings, in the background. All of the universities had to come from somewhere. The Emperors have been the major patrons but building is always a good way for the dynatoi to show off.

A bridge over the Golden Horn would have to be tall enough for a three-decker ship of the line to pass underneath. That’s a pretty tall order (yes, the pun was intentional, leave me alone:p). Plus they would probably be security issues since it’d be a way to bypass the land walls.

A Corinth canal would be a good idea. There’s the Pharaoh’s Canal in Egypt from Suez to Cairo that’s passable by flat-bottomed barges. A full-blown Suez Canal I don’t think is technically feasible yet and won’t appear until steamships are a running theme. According to my research the Red Sea’s winds and currents apparently are not kind at all to sailing ships which is why Aden was such a major port. Ocean sailing ships would transfer their goods to oared vessels for the Red Sea leg in Aden. So building a canal from Med to Red big enough for an ocean-going vessel doesn’t make sense until you can guarantee it can get all the way through the Red Sea safely.

Do you have any ideas for specific land reclamation projects in Greece/Anatolia? Any suggestions would be helpful. One thing arguing against agricultural innovation though is that the Empire can get cheap grain from Egypt and Scythia, plus Vlachia is making a pretty penny supplying Constantinople with foodstuffs and animal products.

Lascaris: Those are lots of good ideas. Church and monastery building is still going strong. Thanks too for the hyperpyron-gold francs-pound sterling info too.




'Our quivering lances shaking in the air
And bullets like Jove's dreadful thunderbolts
Enrolled in flames and fiery smoldering mists
Shall threat the gods more than Cyclopian wars;
And with our sun-bright armor, as we march,
We'll chase the stars from heaven and dim their eyes
That stand and muse at our admired arms'
-Timur the Great in the eponymous play*​

1616: So at last the Empire is at peace…mostly. The border war with the Ottomans continues, albeit at a relatively lighter tempo. The largest pitched battle has four thousand total participants, compared to the record 13,500 three years earlier. With the widespread devastation of the frontier districts, there is little more to wreck. Despite the multiple Roman/Anizzah successes in battle in the category of stuff-to-loot the Ottomans have had a generally better time. Some morbid satisfaction though is derived in Constantinople from the fact that most of those suffering from Ottoman raiders are Syrian Muslim villagers.

As hard as this fighting is on the border provinces, the conflict is barely more than a pinprick for either Empire. Despite the occasional pitched battle numbering in the thousands, the vast majority of warfare is done by flying columns of light cavalry/mounted infantry. At most a couple of hundred, maintaining them is no hardness.

A larger dispatch of Roman troops goes, of all places, to Vlachia. The new King Roman I Musat is facing a serious rebellion led by Mircea cel Mare, the leader of that famous family. One branch of the family emigrated to the Empire in the early 1400s but the bulk stayed in Vlachia where they are extremely prominent landowners. There is a small but powerful stratum of mega-landowners in Vlachia that have grown rich by feeding Constantinople’s gargantuan and continuous appetite for grain, mutton, and leather. At this stage Mircea is the unofficial leader.

However there are some serious allegations circulating in Targoviste that Mircea was in treasonous correspondence with the King of Poland during the Hungarian war. When summoned to the capital to explain himself, Mircea refuses, instead raising an army to march on the capital. Many of his fellow great landowners join him, spying an opportunity to curb Roman and his centralizing desires. Mircea believes that with a cousin on the throne of Rhomania he has a very good chance.

There are two things wrong with his hypothesis. Firstly Roman is also related to the Roman Imperial family; he is a grandson of Theodora Komnena Drakina via her eldest daughter Anastasia. More importantly, given Demetrios II’s willingness to disregard family ties when they are politically inconvenient, is the parallel Mircea’s revolt makes in Roman society.

Those in the Roman government cannot help but view this as a Vlach version of the dynatoi rising up and attempting to overthrow the legitimate monarch. Demetrios has no interest in that. Leo Neokastrites thus leads the Akoimetoi and the Thracian tagma into Vlachia in support of the King. In the one battle the rebels are crushed despite the valor of Mircea, who is described by Demetrios Sideros as “brave as a bull and with about as many brains”. Captured three days later, on the advice of Demetrios II he is executed along with his father, two brothers, and two adult sons. All of the property of his family is confiscated, the surviving members reduced to beggary. Mircea’s sister tries to move to Constantinople to get a pension from one of the Drakoi but Demetrios II has her arrested and expelled.

Leo returns to the capital after the brief campaign, taking a detour to escort Elisabeth, granddaughter of Emperor Friedrich IV, on the last stage of her journey to the White Palace. Eleven years old when she arrives, per the contract she is to spend the next three years learning the language and customs of Rhomania. When both her and her betrothed, Kaisar Andreas, turn fourteen, they will wed. One gift she brings, well calculated to soothe Roman nerves, is the reliquary of Limburg looted from Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade.

Another prominent woman crossing the Roman European frontier is Theodora, the hapless Dowager Queen of Hungary. She pointedly stays away from the capital, refusing to speak with her family that has pretended she hasn’t existed for the past several years. Retiring to a small estate on Lesbos, living on rents that total about as much as Demetrios Sideros’ salary as Kephale of Skammandros, the last daughter of Helena the Elder dies in such obscurity that historians are unsure of what year that happens.

Demetrios Sideros, grandson of the Empress Helena, is in contrast moving up. Much to his annoyance he is promoted to Kephale of Smyrna, one of the most prominent provincial governorships in the entire Empire. In order of precedence he ranks as #3 after the Kephales of Antiocheia and Thessaloniki. It is quite an impressive achievement for a man who turns 31 just after his promotion. It is a promotion he could do without in his opinion. Although it comes with a substantial pay raise it is also a more difficult job.

Smyrna, now at 110,000 inhabitants, is the fourth-largest metropolis in the Empire and in terms of port volume and revenue comparable only to Alexandria and the capital itself. Its civic government can be rightly styled as a commune, the city enjoying substantial self-rule. The Kephalate of Smyrna is larger than the city itself and beyond the walls the commune has no jurisdiction, but nevertheless the Kephale has a significant local power with which to deal. The Kephale ranks as senior and the Imperial government is practically guaranteed to back its appointee in the event of a serious quarrel but the political situation is nevertheless much more complicated than the Skammandros.

As a member of the Imperial family, Demetrios is allowed to live in and work from the Jade Palace, the palace originally erected by Demetrios Megas himself and a favored residence throughout the Second Komnenid dynasty. The young Andreas and his mother and sister were staying there when the Venetians attacked.

Somewhat of a scene though is caused when Jahzara insists on giving birth in the Purple Room of the palace, the room in which Demetrios Sideros himself was born. If Jahzara had been a granddaughter by blood of the Empress she might’ve been allowed but she is only one by marriage. Thus she gives birth to a daughter, named Athena due to her father’s eccentric classical tastes, in the Tea Room instead, a new pavilion modeled on Japanese architecture.

Much to Demetrios’ relief, along with that of future historians, the promotion comes just after he finishes a brief history of the Laskarid dynasty, which begins being published in installments shortly after Athena’s birth. It is surprisingly popular, earning him a respectable supplement to his income. He is helped there by a recently passed copyright law, whereby authors are to receive a percentage of all profits from sale of their works for the first fifteen years after initial publication. It is a frequently flouted law, poorly enforced, Demetrios’ family name and governmental rank serving as better protection in this instance.

One advantage of his work is that rather than a capital-centered narrative the piece has a provincial perspective as his source material is drawn overwhelmingly from the Opsikian and Thrakesian theme archives. Like many histories, the Muslims are presented as typically honorable foes with the Turks particularly based for the valor and steadfastness. Osman, the founder of the Ottoman state, is praised as “brilliant in war, magnanimous in peace, the humbler of the proud, the champion of the poor, few are the monarchs who have equaled him in the annals of empires, and only one has surpassed him”. In contrast the Latins are, almost without exception, portrayed as vicious brutes, incredibly brave but with no other virtues.

This is nothing out of the ordinary. Roman histories will sometimes speak well of Latin kings of earlier times such as Charlemagne and Frederick Barbarossa (the latter inspired by the works of Choniates) but Latins after 1204 are almost irredeemably stained by the crime of the Fourth Crusade.

What is more unusual is the praise for Timur the Great and the criticism of Theodoros III Laskaris, who repudiated his father’s tribute to Timur. Theodoros had been criticized for provoking Timur and losing; Demetrios criticizes Theodoros for provoking Timur at all. It was “stupid vainglory, worthy of an empty-headed Frank, for while great things would be lost in such a conflict, all victory would bestow would be empty accolades and the weeping of widows”.

It is quite possibly a subtle criticism of Demetrios II’s foreign policy vis-à-vis the Ottomans. Even if the Romans seized Mesopotamia, given the extreme difficulties of keeping Syria quiet, keeping it would be impossible. Even Hadrian did not believe it possible. Wrecking Mecca, whilst emotionally satisfying, earned the Empire nothing but Muslim hatred.

One exception to the perceived pointlessness of the conflict is the question of the trans-Aras lands seized from Georgia. In correspondence with his sister the Duchess of Dalmatia and Istria he points out that Iskandar might have written off those lands to focus on his Indian desires. (The counterargument that Iskandar with fifteen extra years to establish dominion in northern India would be a vastly more dangerous foe is left unmentioned.)

Demetrios is apparently not the only one feeling that way. In this year in the Muses’ Theater of Smyrna the play Timur the Great is performed for the first time. Aside from the criticism of Theodoros III (who is the chief villain of the piece) there is also a whiff of atheism about the play. Timur usurps the role of Ares, makes Zeus fear for the safety of his throne, and even threatens to topple Mohammed if he dares to stand in the way of his glory.

Roman culture is certainly thriving at this time. Dmitri Romanov, the great Russian playwright, already famous for his plays on Mikhail Shuisky, first King of Novgorod, and Queen Thamar the Great of Georgia, moves to Constantinople. Here his most renowned works, including David, Lord of Mexico, are writ.

He is not the only immigrant to Rhomania this year as the Lombards move on Genoa in alliance with the Kingdom of the Isles. It is a rather easy conquest given the substantial fifth column in the city itself but many of the Ligurian nobility prefer to make sail, the bulk making their way to Egypt where both the Kephale of Alexandria and the Despot are desirous of new subjects. Thus it comes to pass that Napoleone di Buonaparte is born on the docks of Alexandria.

*Quotation taken from Christopher Marlowe's play
 
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