Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

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Trying to get back into making wikiboxes and made this.

The only issue I see is that the House would have decide between Roosevelt, Clark and Taft, and the Republican establishment (larger than progressives at the time, were firmly behind Taft, not Roosevelt.
 
The only issue I see is that the House would have decide between Roosevelt, Clark and Taft, and the Republican establishment (larger than progressives at the time, were firmly behind Taft, not Roosevelt.
Not to mention Clark was the House Speaker at the time
 
1912 election

Theodore Roosevelt had long been mulling a bid for a third term as president in 1912 since the 1910 midterm. In January 1912 however, Roosevelt would suffer a bad heart attack. It didn't kill him, but he was weakened enough to rule out running in that years election. With this said, other than a convention challenge from Wisconsin senator Robert M. LaFollette, President Taft would be renominated with ease.

However, Roosevelt, LaFollette, and much of the progressive wing of the GOP refused to endorse Taft for a second term, causing low turnout among that sect of the party. With how low the turnout was, Democratic nominee Judson Harmon was able to squeak out a majority of the electoral college and a plurality of the popular vote, becoming the first Democrat president since Grover Cleveland left office in 1897.

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The only issue I see is that the House would have decide between Roosevelt, Clark and Taft, and the Republican establishment (larger than progressives at the time, were firmly behind Taft, not Roosevelt.
Tangentially related, it would be interesting to see a contingent election in the which the second-place and third-place candidates in terms of the popular vote are the only ones realistically under consideration; e.g. Perot somehow wins the popular vote in 1992, but wins no or very few (1-2) delegations in the entirely Democratic and Republican House.
 
Tangentially related, it would be interesting to see a contingent election in the which the second-place and third-place candidates in terms of the popular vote are the only ones realistically under consideration; e.g. Perot somehow wins the popular vote in 1992, but wins no or very few (1-2) delegations in the entirely Democratic and Republican House.

I thought about going this route in my 1912 hung box from a few days ago with Roosevelt getting abandoned/punished for his mutiny by GOP delegations, but ultimately didn't go with it.

This would be very interesting. Especially if the first place candidate also led in the popular vote!
 
I mean... that's usually what first place means, right?

I mean, you win by electoral votes not popular votes, so first place to me always meant the person with the most electoral votes. Which, admittedly, tends to be the person with the most popular votes, too. But not always.

Take for instance a hung scenario where all three candidates were very competitive - the likelihood of electoral leaders and popular vote leaders not matching rises.
 
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I mean, you win by electoral votes not popular votes, so first place to me always meant the person with the most electoral votes. Which, admittedly, tends to be the person with the most popular votes, too. But not always.
Well yes, but that's why I specified "in the which the second-place and third-place candidates in terms of the popular vote." :p
 
Remember Me: A Coco infobox series
Ernesto de la Cruz (you are here)

Ernesto de la Cruz
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Ernesto de la Cruz (4 February 1896 - 2 November 1942) was a Mexican singer and actor. Alongside the likes of Pedro Infante, Jorge Negrete and Javier Solís, he was one of the best known idols of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema and was often considered one of the best singers in Mexican history though would posthumously become infamous about revelations about his career.

Bio
Ernesto de la Cruz was born on 4 February 1896 in the town of Santa Cecilia, Oaxaca, Mexico.

In 1921, both he and his childhood best friend Hector Rivera (1900-1921) would enter entered the music industry and would tour all across Mexico for several months. Rivera would write the songs will de la Cruz would perform them. In the December of that same year, Hector Rivera would die unexpectedly and de la Cruz would continue to perform solo. He had told authorities that his friend had died of food poisoning caused by tainted chorizo, but they had never bothered to tell his wife Imelda (1899-1972) or his young daughter Socorro "Coco" (1918-2018), resulting in Imelda thinking her husband abandoned her and causing her to ban music from her families life and start a new shoe business.

Ernesto de la Cruz would continue his musical career and would make his name well known across Mexico in his two decade career with songs such as "The World is mi Familia", "Un Poco Loco", "Everyone Knows Juanita" and most famously "Remember Me". He would also take on the role of an actor, starring in various films such as "The Flying Priest" and "El Camino a Casa". Reportedly, he did all his own stunts.

Death and Burial
On 2 November (Dias de Muertos) 1942, Ernesto de la Cruz performing in Mexico City on stage finishing a performance of his most famous hit "Remember Me" when a backstage hand was distracted and accidently pulled the lever for the stage's giant church bell; Ernesto, being right under the bell at the moment, was crushed by it and killed instantly.

His body was laid to rest in a large tomb at the Panteon Santa Cecilia Cemetery back in his hometown of Santa Cecilia.

Legacy and Controversy
Following his death, Ernesto de la Cruz would be widely remembered and celebrate across Mexico, especially in his hometown of Santa Cecilia, where a statue of him would be erected in the area of what is now Mariachi Plaza. On every Dias de Muertos, many offerings such as food and guitars would left to him as gifts for the afterlife.

Beginning in late 2017, some infamous revelations about his career would come into light. It was revealed that most, if not all of his songs that he played were not in fact written by de la Cruz as he claimed, but had previously been written by his 1921 touring partner and childhood best friend Hector Rivera. Rivera's daughter Socorro "Coco" shortly before her death would reveal to her family that she kept all her father's letters he wrote to he as a young girl while on the road. An analysis of de la Cruz's songbooks would shortly afterwards prove these revelations to be true.

Coco and her family would also state that de la Cruz's famous skull guitar also belonged to Hector Rivera, haven been bought as a present by her mother Imelda. A picture taken in 1921 of a young Coco and her parents with the famous guitar would be provided as proof.

Further investigation showed that de la Cruz was likely responsible for the death of Hector Rivera, after his remains were unearthed from an unmarked grave in Mexico City and examined in the winter of 2018, where analysis revealed evidence of arsenic poisoning, possibly from tequila spiked with poison. De La Cruz had claimed to authorities in late 1921 that Rivera had died from food poisoning from eating tainted chorizo.

Following these revelations, Ernesto de la Cruz's reputation across Mexico would plummet significantly. Even in his home town of Santa Cecilia, his tomb has been allowed to fall into neglect and a large wooden sign reading "FORGET YOU" was placed on the bust of his head. Hector Rivera has now become the town's new hero and the shoe maker business his family started has his songs from his daughters letters as well as his guitar on display for the public to see.

Photos
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A painting of Ernesto de la Cruz done sometime in his life. It currently hangs inside his mausoleum in the Panteon Santa Cecilia Cemetery in Santa Cecilia.

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Ernesto de la Cruz singing "The World is Mi Familia" in one of his movies.

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Ernesto de la Cruz in the film "El Camino a Casa", which supposedly this scene pictured above is a hint to him murdering Hector Rivera. In the film, Don Hidalgo would spike de la Cruz's drink. However, he would spit it out realizing it's been spiked with poison and proceeds to beat up Dom Hidalgo.

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A still from Ernesto de la Cruz's final performance on 2 November 1942 just as when the giant church bell fell on top of him and crushed him but before the dancers or background musicians reacted.

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A photo of Ernesto de la Cruz's mausoleum in the Panteon Santa Cecilia Cemetery in Santa Cecilia taken on Dias de Muertos in 2017.

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Following a series of revelations about his career coming about in late 2017-early 2018, the bust of Ernesto de la Cruz's head on his mausoleum would have a sign put on it reading "FORGET YOU". The mausoleum would also begin to fall into disrepair.

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A photo of Hector River, his wife Imelda and their daughter Socorro "Coco" taken in 1921 showing that indeed the guitar Ernesto de la Cruz used originally belonged to the Rivera's.

Here is the infobox on Ernesto de la Cruz on Thread V made by Accurateworldwar that inspired me (and I also used the birth and death dates his infobox provided since the movie Coco doesn't give those dates, only the years) to make this one for anyone who wants to look at it: https://www.alternatehistory.com/fo...t-politics-here.430177/page-203#post-17835806

Note: I had to use an image of Pedro Infante on the infobox since I don't know how to add non-Wikipedia images onto an infobox on Windows. Infante already looks like de la Cruz, so I don't think that really matters that much. Also, the snip it tool cut the top of the infobox containing the name because it wouldn't allow me to scroll down and I didn't just want to add a teeny tiny bit of an infobox as a second image with just his name.
 
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Ernesto de la Cruz
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Ernesto de la Cruz (4 February 1896 - 2 November 1942) was a Mexican singer and actor. Alongside the likes of Pedro Infante, Jorge Negrete and Javier Solís, he was one of the best known idols of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema and was often considered one of the best singers in Mexican history.

Bio
Ernesto de la Cruz was born on 4 February 1896 in the town of Santa Cecilia, Oaxaca, Mexico.

In 1921, both he and his childhood best friend Hector Rivera (1900-1921) would enter entered the music industry and would tour all across Mexico for several months. Rivera would write the songs will de la Cruz would perform them. In the December of that same year, Hector Rivera would die unexpectedly and de la Cruz would continue to perform solo. He had told authorities that his friend had died of food poisoning, but they had never bothered to tell his wife Imelda (1899-1972) or his young daughter Coco (1918-2018), resulting in Imelda thinking her husband abandoned her and causing her to ban music from her families life and start a new shoe business.

Ernesto de la Cruz would continue his musical career and would make his name well known across Mexico in his two decade career with songs such as "The World is mi Familia", "Un Poco Loco", "Everyone Knows Juanita" and most famously "Remember Me". He would also take on the role of an actor, starring in various films such as "The Flying Priest" and "El Camino a Casa". Reportedly, he did all his own stunts.

Death and Burial
On 2 November (Dias de Muertos) 1942, Ernesto de la Cruz performing in Mexico City on stage finishing a performance of his most famous hit "Remember Me" when a backstage hand was distracted and accidently pulled the lever for the stage's giant church bell; Ernesto, being right under the bell at the moment, was crushed by it and killed instantly.

His body was laid to rest in a large tomb at the Panteon Santa Cecilia Cemetery back in his hometown of Santa Cecilia.

I will add some images and the remaining info about his legacy and events in recent years tomorrow.
"You are just un poco loco!"
 
I don't know what the hell happened here but it seems cursed.
excuse me what
 
This was my immediate thought, it was a really neat idea. All we need now is one for the Swastika Cycle and we'll have a nice duo
 
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Trying to get back into making wikiboxes and made this.

It's been a while since I read about TR, but I'm fairly certain he hated Bryan. Just, utterly despised the man. I doubt he'd pick the anti-Imperialist Democrat as his pick, or that WJB would go with it.
 
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A Nightmare on Elm Street is a 1984 American slasher film written and directed by Wes Craven, and produced by Robert Shaye. It is the first installment in the A Nightmare on Elm Street film series and stars Jennifer Gray, John Saxon, Ronee Blakley, David Warner as Freddy Krueger, and Charlie Sheen in his film debut. The plot concerns four teenagers living on one street in the fictitious town of Springwood, Ohio, who are invaded and killed in their dreams, and thus killed in reality, by a burnt killer with a bladed leather glove.
 
It's been a while since I read about TR, but I'm fairly certain he hated Bryan. Just, utterly despised the man. I doubt he'd pick the anti-Imperialist Democrat as his pick, or that WJB would go with it.
In 1912 Teddy appealed to Bryan to join the Progressive Party, and Bryan threatened to bolt if Wilson wasnt the nominee, there is an old NYT article on it I will have to link it when I get home.
 
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Timothy William George Collins is a British Conservative Party politician, who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom since 2016. He also served in the shadow cabinets of Iain Duncan-Smith, Michael Howard and David Cameron, and as Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport from 2010 to 2013 and Home Secretary from 2013 to 2016.

Collins was first elected to the House of Commons for Westmorland & Lonsdale in Cumbria in the 1997 election, and has served as MP for the constituency ever since; while he won his seat by only a margin of only 532 votes in 2005, targeted by a ‘decapitation strategy’ by the Liberal Democrats that successfully unseated his Shadow Cabinet colleagues David Davis and Theresa May, in every other election he has been re-elected by a fairly safe margin.

When the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition came to power in 2010, new Prime Minister David Cameron made Collins Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media & Sport (or Culture Secretary, as the post is generally known) in part due to his status as a vocal fan of British television, particularly Doctor Who. While this decision was mocked by some (Simon Hoggart, parliamentary sketch columnist for the Guardian, joked that Cameron had made his government liable to fall if any crucial votes were held on Saturdays at 6:45), it proved canny, as Collins’ vocal respect for British television allayed the fears of some voters who were concerned Cameron was about to start cutting the BBC’s budgets to the bone.

Indeed, in February 2011 Collins hosted a well-publicized dinner in his constituency to which he invited alumni from recent international British television successes, namely Sherlock, Downton Abbey and the newest iteration of Doctor Who. The guest list included actors Matt Smith, Benedict Cumberbatch, Hugh Bonneville and Dame Maggie Smith, and showrunners Steven Moffat, Mark Gatiss and the recently elevated to the peerage Baron Fellowes. While some fans of these series criticized the attendees of supporting the Tories by doing so, almost all of them (aside from Baron Fellowes, of course) stressed that they would just as happily have attended such an event if organized by a Labour Cabinet member; while this passed with relatively little controversy, it was a premonition of things to come.

Collins was also praised for his department’s handling of the 2012 Olympics, particularly the opening ceremony featuring guest spots from Smith and Cumberbatch as the Doctor and Sherlock Holmes and for the memorable short featuring the Queen and James Bond skydiving. Consequently, with his star rising, in the September 2012 reshuffle he was promoted to Home Secretary, a position he occupied for the following 3 years, retaining it after the Tories won the 2015 election with a small overall majority.

When the EU membership referendum was held in 2016, Collins, like most of Cameron’s cabinet, supported a Remain vote, but after the country voted Leave, he asserted his support for a ‘soft’ Brexit and put himself forward for the party leadership. Faced by largely controversial challengers such as Boris Johnson, Michael Gove and Andrea Leadsom, Collins managed to gather a decent amount of support and ultimately won the leadership, mostly due to his challengers dropping out during the contest.

His ‘coronation’ became a point of contention from the start, but more contentious was a row that took place in August 2016, shortly after becoming Prime Minister. In his first press conference, he joked about being ‘the most senior Whovian in history’, a remark which did not go down well with certain people involved with the series. One such person was former Doctor Peter Davison, who had recently tweeted his distaste for Boris Johnson, Collins’ new Foreign Secretary; when Davison condemned Collins as ‘a little hypocrite and a disgrace to everyone associated with Doctor Who’, Collins responded by criticizing Davison’s ‘blatant partisanship’. In response, numerous figures associated with the series stated their opposition to Collins and the values his government stood for, and he found himself compared to Donald Trump for being drawn into an embarrassing spat on social media.

Unlike Trump, Collins learned from the incident and stopped responding to people associated with the series (though it is alleged he simply had his PR team take to using Twitter instead of him). Consequently, he stuck to trying to secure support for things like ‘the end of austerity’ (though the maths didn’t really point to this in the long run, it turned heads for ending one of the most unpopular parts of Cameron’s government), taking a middle ground on Brexit and, above all, portraying Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn as a dangerous radical and the Scottish National Party as supporting the breakup of the UK.

By the spring of 2017, his poll numbers had recovered, and after a promising victory in the Copeland by-election, he chose to call a snap general election for the 4th May, concurrently with the local elections, to increase his government’s majority. While most of the British public clashed over support for or opposition to Brexit, a similar clash happened in Doctor Who fandom; many popular figures involved with the show urged fans not to support Collins, including six Doctors (in addition to Davison, Tom Baker, Colin Baker, Christopher Eccleston, David Tennant and the then-incumbent Peter Capaldi ), and many others, including showrunners Russell T Davies and Steven Moffat, admitted they would not vote for Collins’ party even if they did not tell fans not to.

Regardless of the controversy, and press interest over the ‘Whovian election’, it had little effect on the result; Collins won a landslide majority of 104, unseating many Labour MPs in seats thought safe thanks to the ‘Brexit effect’ and picking up seats from the SNP due to fears of Scottish independence coming true. Much to the disappointment of the Labour left, Corbyn was forced to resign and replaced with the more moderate (and less appealing to the party base) Keir Starmer.

Since the 2017 election, Collins’ government has sought to negotiate a Brexit deal with the EU and ultimately settled on the ‘Norway option’, a largely continuity-focused plan which secures a similar trade standard to pre-Brexit but allows the UK slightly more autonomy. Critics have pointed out that since the European Economic Area is still in effect and trade deals still require a sizeable amount of compromise over trade allowances and immigration, Brexit has ultimately created a situation where the UK has basically the same restrictions but no longer has the right to the opt-outs or votes it had while part of the EU.

The deal has consequently done little to sate either advocates of remaining in the EU or the far right, with Nigel Farage’s new Sovereignty Party eating into the Tories’ vote in the 2018 and 2019 local elections even as UKIP has died a death without its original raison d’être and the party also bleeding votes to Vince Cable’s ardently pro-EU Liberal Democrats (notably losing a by-election in Brecon & Radnorshire to them in 2019) and Starmer’s Labour, which has started to advocate for seeking full membership again. Despite this, the Tories retain a strong grip on Parliament, and Collins re-ingratiated himself with Doctor Who fandom by welcoming the announcement of the casting of Jodie Whittaker just after his re-election with open arms when many figures in fandom and associated with the programme (including, ironically enough, Peter Davison) did not.

While his party’s situation seemed to be improving until 2020, Collins’ fortunes started to falter again with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. His government’s response to it proved confused and ineffective, to the point that in April, after falling seriously ill with the virus, Boris Johnson died of it, and in a huge upset, the Tories lost the subsequent Uxbridge & West Ruislip by-election to Labour. In response, Collins implemented a strict lockdown and compensatory measures to those furloughed who were unemployed, as part of a campaign jokingly nicknamed ‘Exterminate the virus’ which resulted in cases falling, though once these measures started to be relaxed in June, cases rose significantly again.

Much like the series he is so closely associated with, as of late 2020, the future of the Collins government looks greatly uncertain. Public opinion on his government’s handling of the coronavirus has been generally negative, with 61% of those surveyed calling the government’s response ‘poor’ or ‘very poor’. He has adamantly opposed the renewed support for Scottish independence, but for the first time since 2014, his party is consistently trailing Labour in the polls and Starmer and SNP leadership figures like Nichola Sturgeon have spoken of an anti-Tory tactical voting alliance for the next election when it comes that has started to gain traction. Whether anything will come of this is hard to say at this point, but in any case, it seems entirely possible the Tories may not win a fourth term in government. Of course, two years is a long time in politics, and by 2022 it is entirely possible his government will recover.
 
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